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STATEMENTS ON FEDERAL AID 
TO TELEVISION 


by 


THE TWO PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 
* * * 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 


COPY 


U, S. Senator . . . JOHN F. KENNEDY 


October 14, 1960 


Mr. William G. Harley, President 
National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
Dupont Circle Building 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Harley: 

It is a pleasure to extend greetings and good wishes to the 3 6th Convention 
of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. 

You are meeting at a time when American leadership is challenged as never 
before in its history; at a time when our well-being as a nation is in jeopardy. If 
we are to defend ourselves effectively in a world of international tension and move 
ahead, we must rely nc less upon the strength of our educational system than upon 
the strength of our military establishment. Jefferson attached the utmost importance 
to **the diffusion of knowledge among the people. No other sure foundation can be 
devised.** he said, #, fcr the preservation of freedom and happiness.** The issue 
of education is clearly bound up with our national stature; one cannot and has not 
through American history been achieved without the other. 









- 2 - 


Today our schools and colleges face a crisis of appalling proportions in terms 
of deficits in dollars, teachers, classrooms and services. American progress and 
even our national survival is directly dependent on what we as a nation do now 
about the shameful weaknesses and deficiencies of our educational system. 

We must seize all means at hand to help education cope with these dire 
shortages and improve both the quality and quantity of educational opportunities 
available to our citizens at all levels, both in and out of school. 

Television, a device which has the potential to teach more things to more 
people in less time than anything yet devised, seems a providential instrument to 
come to education’s aid. Educational television has already proved that it can be 
a valuable supplement to formal education and a direct medium for non-formal 
education. 

Despite the heroic efforts of people such as yourselves to establish educational 
television stations across the country, only a small part of the total potential has 
been achieved. To date, only 50 of the 256 channels reserved for education have 
been activated and two-thirds of the population still has no access to educational 
television service. This is not for lack of zeal or interest on the part of educators 
or state or local officials, but, primarily, for lack of funds for the initial capital 
investment required for construction of stations • 

Since education is a matter of national concern, the Federal Government should 
assist in expediting and accelerating the use of television, as a tested aid to educa¬ 
tion in the schools and colleges of the nation and as a means of meeting the needs 
of adult education. A useful start has already been made in this direction by the 
Government through the National Defense Education Act; more should be done to 
assist the development of educational television for the benefit of all our people. 

I pledge you that I will back actively suitable legislation aimed at this objective 
in the next session of the Congress and will urge its support by my Democratic 
colleagues. 

Finally, I should like to congratulate the National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters, for its distinguished accomplishments to date and wish it continued 
success in seeking to project the electronic media into the full usefulness of which 
they are capable in the service of American education and the welfare of our country. 

Sincerely, 

(signed) 


John F. Kennedy 


- 3 - 


COPY 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT October 10, 1960 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 


It is a great pleasure to extend greetings to the National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters upon the occasion of its 36th convention and to wish 
you a fruitful outcome in your deliberations. Those of you who are actively working 
in the field of educational radio and television bear a grave responsibility. This 
Nation must improve and make the fullest use of all educational means at its 
disposal in order to adjust the institutions and methods of democracy to the demands 
of a speeding world. In this regard, the leaders in educational broadcasting have 
a great opportunity as well as an obligation. 

The headlines almost daily remind us of the challenges which our children 
and our children's children face in the years ahead. To meet these challenges 
the continued strengthening of our educational system is of crucial importance. 

We now have in this country the resources and the technical means of granting to 
every citizen of our country his birthright — the right to adequate education. All 
tested means of aiding and improving instruction must be given support and encourage 
ment. We must also be ingenious in using radio and television. They are proved 
instructional tools which have an immense potential for the benefit of American 
education and the welfare of our country. 

In the program of education that I recently announced, I stressed the fact that 
education is a matter of vital public concern, and that the Federal Government has 
an obligation to encourage and assist public and private efforts to improve the quality 
and scope of education at all levels. 

The importance of radio and television as educational tools has been recognized 
in a variety of ways. These include the assignment of FM and TV frequencies for 
educational use, the inclusion in the Office of Education’s Cooperative Research 
Program of projects related to television instruction and the research program in 
new educational media authorized by Title VII of the National Defense Education Act. 

In this latter respect, as you well know, the U.S. Office of Education has 
developed a program designed to assist and foster needed research to provide a 
sound basis for the orderly and effective development of television as a tool of 
education. 

I pledge my cooperation in the development of a national educational television 
policy to help realize the goal of the fullest possible educational opportunity for ever; 
American. This policy should have set forth the basic objectives of the Nation in 
the field of educational television and it should define respective roles of the 
Federal and other levels of government, broadcasters, educational institutions and 



- 4 - 


others concerned. Within its assigned role Federal assistance in the stimulation 
of the use of television as an aid to education will have my sympathy and support. 

Also, as I have indicated in my Education Program, I have pledged my support 
to a continuing program of Federal assistance in strengthening education at all 
levels without interfering with private and local control of our educational system. 

And now, may I congratulate the National Association of Educational Broadcaster 
on its 35 years of service to American Education and wish it success both in its 
convention and in its continuing work of promoting educational, cultural and 
public service broadcasting. 


Sincerely, 
(signed) 
Richard Nixon 


Mr. William G. Harley 
Chairman of the Board 
National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, 
Washington, D.C. 


The National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 

Washington 6, D.C. 


Phone: NOrth 7-6000 


m SS'^ s 


87th CONGRESS 
1st Session 


H. R. 965 


IN THE HOUSE OE REPRESENTATIVES 

January 3,1961 

Mr. Harris introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Com¬ 
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce 


A BILL 

To expedite the utilization of television transmission facilities in 
our public schools and colleges, and in adult training pro¬ 
grams. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 

3 That there is hereby authorized to be appropriated such 

4 amounts as may be necessary to assist the States and certain 

5 organizations therein to establish or improve television broad- 

6 casting for educational purposes, in accordance with the pro- 

7 visions of this Act, by providing for the establishment and 

8 improvement of television broadcasting facilities. 

9 Sec. 2. Any agency or officer, or organization in a State, 
10 described in clause (b) (2) of this section, which is establish- 


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13 

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15 

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17 

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19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 


ing or improving television broadcasting facilities, may re¬ 
ceive a grant as authorized in this Act to cover the cost of 
such establishment or improvements by— 

(a) making application therefor in such form as is 
prescribed by the United States Commissioner of Edu¬ 
cation; and 

(b) providing assurance satisfactory to the Com¬ 
missioner of Education— 

(1) that the necessary funds to operate and 
maintain such facilities will be available; 

(2) that the operation of such facilities will be 
under the control of (a) the agency or officer 
primarily responsible for the State supervision of 
public elementary and secondary schools, (b) a 
nonprofit foundation, corporation, or association or¬ 
ganized primarily to engage in or encourage educa¬ 
tional television broadcasting, (c) a duly consti¬ 
tuted State educational television commission, or 
(d) a State controlled college or university; and 

(3) that such facilities will be used only for 
educational purposes. 

Sec. 3. Upon determining that an agency or officer or 
an organization has satisfied the requirements of section 2 of 
this Act, the Commissioner of Education is authorized to 
make a grant to such agency, officer, or organization in such 


3 


1 amount as is determined by the Commissioner to be reason- 

2 able and necessary to cover the cost of such establishment or 

3 improvement of facilities. An agency or officer or an organi- 

4 zation may receive one or more grants under the provisions 

5 of this Act, but the total amount of such grants for television 

6 broadcasting facilities in any State shall not exceed 

7 $1,000,000. Such grants shall be made out of funds appro- 

8 priated for the purposes of this Act, and may be made in 

9 such installments as the Commissioner deems appropriate. 

10 Sec. 4. As used in this Act the term “establishing or im- 

11 proving television broadcasting facilities” means the acqui- 

12 sition and installation of transmission apparatus necessary for 

13 television (including closed-circuit television) broadcasting, 

14 and does not include the construction or repair of structures 

1 5 to house such apparatus, and the term “State” means the 
10 several States and the District of Columbia. 

17 Sec. 5. The Federal Communications Commission is au- 

18 thorized to provide such assistance in carrying out the pro- 

19 visions of this Act as may be requested by the Commissioner 

20 of Education. 

21 Sec. 6. Nothing in this Act shall be deemed (a) to give 

22 the Commissioner of Education any control over television 

23 broadcasting, or (b) to amend any provision of, or require- 

24 ment under, the Federal Communications Act. 

Sec. 7. No application for any grant under this Act 


25 


4 


1 may be accepted by the Commissioner of Education after the 

2 day which is five years after the date of enactment of this 

3 Act. 


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NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

1346 CONNECTICUT ML, N. W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 


87th CONGRESS If O f* A ^ 

1st Session fl, 1\ # 


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

January 3,1961 

Mr. Boggs introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Com¬ 
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce 


A BILL 

To amend the Communications Act of 1934 to assist in the 
establishment and improvement of certain television broad¬ 
casting facilities. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 

3 That title III of the Communications Act of 1934 is amended 

4 by adding at the end thereof the following new part: 

5 “Part III— Establishment and Improvement of 

6 Television Broadcasting Facilities 

7 “Sec. 381. Any State agency or officer, or organization 

8 in a State, described in clause (b) (2) of this section, which 

9 is establishing or improving television broadcasting facilities, 


I—O 




2 

1 may receive a grant as authorized in this part to cover the 

2 cost of such establishment or improvement by— 

3 “ (a) making application therefor in such form as 

4 is prescribed by the Commissioner; and 

5 “ (b) providing assurance satisfactory to the Com- 

6 missioner— 

7 “(1) that the necessary funds to operate and 

8 maintain such facilities will be available; 

9 “ (2) that the operation of such facilities will 

10 be imder the control of (a) the State agency or 

11 officer primarily responsible for the State super- 

12 vision of public elementary and secondary schools, 

13 (b) a non-profit foundation, corporation, or associ- 

14 ation organized primarily to engage in or encourage 

15 educational television broadcasting, (c) a duly con- 

16 stituted State educational television commission, or 

17 (d) a State controlled college or university; and 

18 “ (3) that such facilities will be used only for 

19 educational purposes. 

20 “Sec. 382. Upon determining that a State agency or 

21 officer or an organization has satisfied the requirements of 

22 section 381 of this part, the Commissioner is authorized to 

23 make a grant to such agency, officer, or organization in such 


s 


1 amount as is determined by the Commissioner to be reason- 

2 able arid necessary to cover the cost of such establishment 

3 or improvement of facilities. A State agency or officer or 

4 an organization may receive one or more grants under the 

5 provisions of this part, but the total amount of such grants 

6 for television broadcasting facilities in any State shall not 

7 exceed $ 1 , 000 , 000 . Such grants shall be made out of funds 
g appropriated for the purposes of this part, and may be made 
9 in such installments as the Commissioner deems appropriate. 

40 “Sec. 388. As used in this part the term ‘establishing 
44 or improving television broadcasting facilities’ means the 

42 acquisition and installation of apparatus necessary for tele- 

43 vision (including closed circuit television) broadcasting or 

14 the improvement of television broadcasting, and does not in- 

15 elude the construction or repair of structures to house such 

16 apparatus, the term ‘Commissioner’ means the Commissioner 

17 of Education of the United States, and the term ‘State’ 

18 means the several States, the District of Columbia, and the 

19 Territories of Alaska and Hawaii. 

20 “Sec. 384. The Commission is authorized to provide 

21 such assistance in carrying out the provisions of this part 

22 as may be requested by the Commissioner. 

23 “Sec. 385. Nothing in this part shall be deemed to give 


4 

1 the Commissioner any control over television broadcasting. 

2 “Sec. 386. There are hereby authorized to be appro- 

3 priated such amounts as may be necessary to assist the 

4 States and certain organizations therein as provided in this 

5 part.” 






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The Greater Washington Educational Television Association, Inc. 


RALEIGH HOTEL 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 

February 17, 1961 


District 7-5271-2 


Mr. William G. Harley 

Suite 1119, DuPont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

My dear Mr. Harley: 

Thank you for sending me a copy of the 
Magnuson bill and for suggesting that we might like 
to present a statement from the Greater Washington 
Educational Television Association in support of 
S.205• We have been requested to appear on March 2 
to express again the interest of our organization 
in this legislation. If you have any suggestions 
as to points which should be included in our testi¬ 
mony we would be happy to receive them. 


Yours very sincerely, 



(Mrs/ Edmund ,D. Campbell) 
President, GWETA, Inc. 




American 


COTTON MANUFACTURERS INSTITUTE, Inc. 



Mr. William G. Harley 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
Suite 1119 

DuPont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Harley: 

I wish to acknowledge receipt of your letter of February 13, 
and to let you know that this afternoon the Board of Education took 
formal action recommending to the Commissioners of the District 
of Columbia support of S. 205. 

It has not been indicated yet whether or not the Board of 
Education will make a formal appearance at the hearings on March 1 and 2. 

I am not aware of the Board having been invited by the Committee 
to express itself, and unless there is such a request, it would be my 
impression that the Board will take no further action beyond that which 
it did this afternoon. 

I wish to thank you for sending me a copy of the bill. 



Rowland F. Kirks 
General Counsel 





February 27, 1081 


Mr. Nicholas Zapple 

Senate Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee 
New Senate Office Building 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Dear Nick: 

Here is the tentative lineup of witnesses who will testify 
at the hearings on S205, March 1 and 2, 

Wednesday, March 1 

!• Se na tor bee Metcalf 

2. John Schwarsswalder, Manager, KTCA-TV, St. Paul- 
Minneapolls 

J Q A frJs&'- 

3. Thomas Aubrey, President of CBS-Televislon 

^ Charles Boehm, State Superintendent of Schools, 
Pennsylvania 



»#' Hr ling Jorgenson, Director, Montana ETV Project 


6. Mrs. Robert Hornung, President Greater Cleveland 
Television Education Association 

7. George Brain, Superintendent, Baltimore City Schools 

8. Loren Stone, Manager, KCTS-TV, Seattle, Washington 
Thursday, March 2 

0. John Burns, President, RCA 

10. Mrs. Edmund Campbell, President, Greater Washington 
Educational Television Association 

11. Frederick Ford, Chairman, Federal Communications 
Commission 





Mr. Nicholas Sapple 


*2- 


Feforuary 27, 1961 


12. Barnard Evaratt, Assistant Superintendent of 

Schools, Newton, Mass. 

13. Joe Baud!no. Vice President, Wastiaghouse Broadcasting 
Co., Inc. 

14. Alice Bell, legislative Liason, American Association 
of University Women 

15. kort Zimmerman, President, Electron Corporation 

Sincerely yours. 


William G. Harley 



2/28/61 


RE: Magnuson Bill Hearings 

Location: Senate Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee 
Hearing Room 

5110 New Senate Office Building 

Time: March 1 - 10:00 am 
March 2 - 10:00 am 

Members of Sub-committee on Power and Communications 

Pastore: Chairman Rhode Island 

Monroney - Oklahoma 

Thurman - South Carolina 

Yarborough - Texas 

McGee . Wyoming 

Hartke - Michigan 

Case 9 New Jersey 

Cotton - New Hampshire 

Scott # Pennsylvania 



Bill Harley, Pres* 

HASS 

Washington, B. C, 

Bear Bill* 

With reference to my trip to Washington to 
testify before the Hagnuson Committee on the 
ETV bill, Haroh 1 and 2, would you ask Harold 
Hill to provide me with an advance of funds? 

Jet coach fare is $288.60, so with hotel, 
meals and ground transportation I can use 
so ©where in the neighborhood of $350# 

Incidentally I have made hotel reservations 
at the Dupont Plaaa. 


Let me know where and at what hour I am sched¬ 
uled to appear before the committee. I will 
arrive raid-evening March 1. 

I* 11 send a copy of this to Hill, since you 1 11 
be enroute to alt Laics and I *11 need the funds 
by Monday the 27th to pick up my ticket on ray 
return from Salt Lake. 



cct Harold Hill, Urbana 














February 20, 1961 


Mr. George Brain 
Superintendent 
Balitmore^ty Schools 
Towson, Maryland 

Dear Mr. Brain: 

As I indicated in our phone conversation, we have 
been asked to suggest witnesses to appear in connect 
ion with hearings on March 1 and 2 before the Senate 
Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee on Bill 
S205, introduced by Senator Magnuson 

As one who can testify from personal experience as 
the di~£fergnC-e~„he:fcweeH~-eommtmit;dw ^ 

n ot_ha va ^Jaa^anaX^ts.^ television, vou o - r 

canjiake^a uniqueand important contribution to these Jr r 

hearings.. Y J / 

It is my understanding that you will be available to ^ 
testify the afternoon of March 1. The hearings will 
be held in the Interstate and Foreign Commerce Comm¬ 
ittee Hearing Room in Room 5110, New Senate Office / 

Rnilriinff JF 



Building. 

n enclose a copy of the bill for your reference. 
If you have questions or we can help in any way. 
please feel free to call. 

Sincerely yours, 



William G. Harley 







WGH ;mem 
Enclosure 

Xhr&r^lt you wish^to file written testimony, the 
Committee requires the submission of 50 copies. 


c 


W. G. H. 







21 February 1961 


Mrs. Robert Homung, 

2240 Elandon Drive, 

Cleveland Heights, 6, 

Ohio. 

Dear Mrs. Homungi 

As I indicated in our phone conversation, we have been asked 
to suggest witnesses to appear in connection with hearings on 
March 1 and 2 before the Senate Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
Committee on Bill S205, introduced by Senator Magnuson. 

As one who can testify from personal experience as to the efforts 
your community has made to activate a channel ** efforts which 
have been unavailing for lack of funds but not for lack of zeal - 
you can make an important contribution to these hearings. 

It is my understanding that you will be available to testify the 
afternoon of March 1. Hie hearings will be held in the Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce Committee Hearing Room in Room 5110, New 
Senate Office Building. 

If you wish, in addition to your oral presentation, to file written 
testimony, the Committee requires the submission of 50 copies. 

I enclose a copy of the bill for your reference. If you have 
questions or we can help in any way, please feel free to call. 

Sincerely yours, 


William G. Harley 

WGH:jph 

Enclosure 
























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2/28/61 


RE: Magnuson Bill Hearings 

Location: Senate Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee 

Hearing Room 

5110 New Senate Office Building 

Time: March 1 - 10:00 am 
March 2 - 10:00 am 

Members of Sub-committee on Power and Communications 

Pastore: Chairman Rhode Island 

Monroney - Oklahoma 

Thurman - South Carolina 

Yarborough - Texas 

McGee - Wyoming 

Hartke - Michigan 

Case , New Jersey 

Cotton - New Hampshire 

Scott , Pennsylvania 


Dear 


7 AWKtfW 


£ mjkhw mthdh rrogrm rrumbxkt ndkiikwx ibn mkmnmxTtik mtnvtlm 

As you know, the~ Subcommittee on Communications and Power of the 
House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee has been conducting 
hearings jsx in connection with the consideration of legislation to 
provide Federal aid to educational television* 


Public testimony has been concluded and thz it is e xpected that the 
committee will be considering this legislation in the near future. 

Mr. (NAME OF CONGRESSMAN) of (NAME OF TOWN AND STATE) is a ''member of 
the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee, and I thought, 
if you ha.ve not already done so, that you might like to convey your views 
regarding this legislation to him. 


Sincerely, 

heh 


Alternate letter 
Dear -* 

COPY FIRST PARAGRAPH OF ABOVE 

COPY FIRST SENTENCE OF SECOND PARAGRAPH ABOVE, THEN: Mr. (NAME OF 
CONGRESSMAN) of (NAME OFT OWN AND STATE - OR COUNTY OF WHATEVER) is 

a member of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee. While 
we don't have any NAEB members in that area, I thought you might have 
a friend there who, if he has ocnt already done so, might like " 
to convey his views regarding this legislation a£ (NAME OF CONGRESSMAN). 
Or, failing that, perhaps you, your self, would like to do so, Anyway 


heh 


Sincerely, 



Af-fe- 


ru & m* sr. 

John Bell Williams, Raymond, Mississippi r 

Includes all of Yazoo County, Western borders of Mississippi River.v 
Counties of Hinds, Copiah, Lincoln and Walthall 

FT*. 


Kenneth A. Roberts, Anniston, Alabama 


Counties: St. Clair, Calhoun, Talladegga, Clay, Coosa, Elmore, Autauga, 
Dallas 

Peter F. Mack, Jr. Carlinville, Illinois s^ c Xo*a 

Central part of State. Counties: Sangamon, Cumberland, Effingham, Edgar, 
Crawford, Jasper, Clark, Christian, Shelby, Macoupin 




‘-'-VC (_ 


Morgan M. Moulder. Camdenton, Mo. - /tea/ 

Center of Missouri between St. Louis and Kansas City 


Harley 0. Staggers. Kyser, W. Va. 

Includes Eastern panhandle. As far west as the Northern Panhandl 

Walter Rogers Pampa, Texas P.Mir*,!U / 

Northernmost panhandle. South almost to Plainview. c TSu/_ 



Samuel N. Friedel Baltimore, Md. o/e CUy^ s ^ Cso v 

One third of Baltimore. Crescent around the city. 

Brit '**t _jZdL t 

John J. Flynt, Jr. Griffin, Georgia 4 , 

Area Southwest of Atlanta and goes to Alabama state line ana stops 
north of Columbus. 15 Counties 


Torbert H. Macdonald Malden, Mass ^Z^***^ A ^ -yr 7 ’J 

8th District. Cities included are:: Everett, Lynnfield, Malden, Medxord, 
Melrose, N. Readihg, Reading, Saugus, Somerville, Stonehan, Wakefield. 
They are in the northeastern part of the state. 


John Jarman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma ^ K ~ Com? *nd. 

Central part of state. Counties: Canadian, Oklahoma, Cleveland, McClain 
and Garvin 









CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

COMMITTEE ON 

INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE 
ROOM 1334, HOUSE OFFICE BUILDING 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 


n/v/ 


Eighty-Sixth Congress 

^ Oren Harris, Ark„, Chairman 

John Bell Williams, Miss. 


t/Peter F. Mack, Jr., Ill/ 

XiCenneth A. Roberts, Ala. 

^Morgan M. Moulder, Mo.* 2 / Ull 


^Harley 0. Staggers, W. 

Va . f-3 3 / 

X Walter Rogers, Tex.* 

110 to 

Xg Samuel N. Friedel, Md. 

tf-l 

(/ John J. Flynt, Jr. f Ga 

* (fsrol 

Xxorbert H. Macdonald, 

Mass. X& 3 

\f George M. Rhodes, Pa. 


i^/john Jarman, Ok la. 

nil 

* Ajq o W. O’Brien, N.Y. 


" John E, Moss, Calif.* 


^John D. Dingell, Mich. 

(ft 11 

^ Joe M. Kilgore, Tex. 

31 

Xpaul G. Rogers, Fla. 

1>ooi 


7 Robert W. Hemphill, S.C. 
iX Dan Rostenkowskl, Ill.* 
/James C. Healey, N.Y. 


John B. Bennett, Mich. 
William L. Springer, Ill. 
Paul F. Schenck, Ohio 
J. Arthur Younger, Calif.* 
William H. Avery, Kans.* 
Harold R. Collier, Ill. 
Milton W. Glenn,NJ. 

Samuel L. Devine, Ohio 
'/Ancher Nelaen, Minn. 
''Hastings Keith, Mass. 
Dillard S. Curtin, Pa. 
t/Abner W. Sibal, Conn.* 
Vernon W. Thomson, Wise. 


W. E. Williamson, Clerk 


* Subcommittee on Communications and Power 
1/Chairman of Subcommittee 





VL _77— 








INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE 
ROOM 1334, HOUSE OFFICE BUILDING 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 


/ 

Oren Harris, Ark. 
John Bell Williams, Miss. 


Eighty-Sixth Congress 

Chairm 


irm^n 

^<fohn B. Bennett, Mich 


Peter F. Mack, Jr., Ill. 
Kenneth A. Roberts, Ala. 
Morgan M. Moulder, Mo,* 2/ 
Harley 0. Staggers, W.Va. 
Walter Rogers, Tex.* 

Samuel N. Friedel, Md. 

John J. Flynt, Jr., Ga.* 
Torbert H. Macdonald, Mass. 
^George M. Rhodes, Pa. t £S^£ 
John Jarman, Okla. 

Leo W. O’Brien, N.Y. / 

/ John E. Moss, Calif,* ZJCt 
\/ John D. Dlngell, Mich, 

>/ Jpe M. Kilgore, Tex. pX 3/ 
'"Paul G. Rogers, Fla. 3 &0l 


William L. Springer, 111.2^7/ 
"^Paul F. Schenck, Ohio 6 

Arthur Younger, Calif. 
'^William H. Avery, Kans. *57 01 
^sirold R. Collier, Ill. </JT£ ( 


y 

Milton W. Glenn,NJ. 5 STi / 


^Samuel L. Devine, Ohio £T3 ST£*“ 
^Ancher Nelsen, Minn. 2 V7 2~ 
^Hastings Keith, Mass. 

11 lard s. Curirin, Pa. 

Abner W. Sibal, Conn.* / 

^ Vernon W. Thomson, Wise. 


vi 


/^Robert W. Hemphill, S.C. g~S6l 
V Dsn Rostenkowskl, Ill.* *40Q / 
l/jam 


-James C. Healey, N.Y. £ 


W. E. Williamson, Clerk 


* Subcommittee on Communications and Power 
1/Chairman of Subcommittee 

















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NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington 6, D. C. 

Memorandum To: ETV Station Managers 

From: W. G. Harley 

Date: March 20, 1961 

In response to questions growing out of the proceedings in connection with 
WHrsr's application for Channel 12, Wilmington, Eelaware, the HAKB Board, at its 
meeting in Milwaukee, March 15, approved this motion: 

The NAKB Board accepts with approval the following statement, 
recommended hy its President, and directs that it he communicated to the 

ETV community: 

1. NAEB hereby reaffirms its position in reference to the importance 
of the new media; its recognition of the Association’s leadership responsibility 
in securing for education access to adequate spectrum space; and its pledge to 
assist with whatever resources it can bring to bear in helping to secure such 
facilities to meet educational needs. 

2. NAEB places itself on record as firmly supporting WHYY in its 
application to secure Channel 12 for educational use and offers, if such 
assistance is deemed useful hy WHTC counsel, to testify as a public witness in 
the instant proceeding. 

3. As a general policy, NAEB takes the position that in any com¬ 
petition for channels between commercial and non-commercial applicants, the 
public interest is better served by awarding the facility to the educational 
interest. To that end, wherever feasible, NAEB will support the educational 
application. In cases where more than one educational interest is involved, 

NAEB will avoid involvement in behalf of one or another of the educational applican 


Memo, to ETV Station Managers, Mar. 20, 1961 


Page 2 


4. In any future case involving an educational applicant in which 

1 ?i' vn 'i of NfEB's general legal counsel might participate in "behalf -f ^ 

commercial client, RAEB will, upon request, retain special counsel to assist 
the counsel of the educational applicant. 

The Board took note of the requests of the ETV managers meeting in 
Milwaukee and in reply stated: 

1 . it will "be pleased to arrange for an annual meeting of the ETV 
managers and the KAE3 TV Board. Arrangements will he made for such a session 
each year in connection with the NAEB convention. In addition, if such a 
meeting is deemed advisable this year in connection with the IERT, such 
arrangements can he made. 


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

1346 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 

Washington 6, D. C* 


Memorandum to: News Directors of all NAEB Radio and Television Stations 
From: NAEB National Office, Washington 

Date: March 21, 19 61 


You recently received, or should have received, an invitation from the State De¬ 
partment regarding a Foreign Policy Briefing Conference for radio and television 
news editors throughout the country. This is to add a few words of detail since 
many of you expressed a desire to know more about it. 

In a conversation with State Department officials this morning we learned the fol¬ 
lowing : 

The Foreign Policy Briefing Conference is a totally new idea. It is an attempt 
to provide an opportunity for news directors throughout the country to hear and be¬ 
come acquainted with and to exchange ideas with the top policy makers in the 
country. The purpose of the Conference is to provide better understanding, in 
both directions, between the Administration and yourselves. 

The Conference host is Secretary of State Dean Rusk. Others who will par¬ 
ticipate include the President, who will, perforce, be there only briefly, top State 
Department officials (only Chester Bowles, as of this writing, has not been able to 
clear the time yet) Allan Dulles, Edward R. Murrow, and a number of other key 
officials in other federal agencies. There will be many opportunities for questions 
and answers. 

This is the first time broadcasters have been recognized in quite this way. 
Invited, besides yourselves, are news editors and some public affairs personnel 
of commercial stations in the nation, and key news and public service people from 
the networks. 

Newspaper and other press editors will be invited to a similar conference April 
24 and 25. It is not without significance that the first conference is for broad¬ 
casters, nor was it in any way a coincidence. The State Department intended for 
this to indicate its recognition of the importance of the broadcast media in presen¬ 
tation of news and information. 

The Conference will be held April 3 and 4 in the New State Department Building 
Auditorium. 

Finally, and most important, the State Department will appreciate your earliest 
answer if you plan to come. They need this information in order to make proper plans 
and in order to send you who are coming further details on the Conference, on hotel 
arrangements and so forth. Please address vour replies soonest, therefore ^jto 
Mr. Roger Tubbv, Department of State. Washington 25, D. C. 




STATEMEN 


BY: 


t&BftS 


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

The Subcommittee on Communications and Power of the House 
of Representatives, March 23, 1961 

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters re-affirms its pre¬ 
vious statements in support of educational television legislation and the testimony 
of its president, William G. Harley, before this Committee of the Eighty-Sixth 
Congress. 

The need for the provisions of this legislation has become more acute 
since it was last considered, and in further support of this proposed legislation 
the Association herewith re-emphasizes certain statements and presents addi¬ 
tional information for the consideration of the Committee. 

The crisis confronting education in this country regarding the lack of 
facilities and teachers to cope with ever mounting enrollments has been too well 
documented to need repeating here. By increasing the productivity of good 
teachers, and making adjustments possible in teacher loads and functions, 
educational television can greatly assist with this problem. 

Educational television also provides a type of general public programming 
service which commercial television so far has not been able to offer in any¬ 
thing like adequate quantity or quality. Educational television makes the best 
minds of America’s great educational institutions available to the whole country. 

It expands the public service potential of state and federal agencies. This 
sort of programming provides eloquent testimony of the social, educational and 
general public service responsibility of educational television as it is emerging 


in the United States. 


- 2 - 


The record of educational television's contributions to education at all 
levels is an impressive one. But it exists in all too few spots to provide the 
national assistance our educational effort requires now . Well over 50% of the 
people in this country live in areas not served by educational television. All 
but some 25 of the great universities of the United States have no television 
stations. All but some 200 of the 40,000 school systems of the nation are years 
away from access to this electronic miracle unless federal assistance is provided. 
Without federal support there may well be considerably fewer than 100 educational 
television stations in the nation for many years, while 150 to 175 other frequencies, 
allocated for education, lie fallow. With few exceptions, potential state, 
regional and national networks will remain unrealized dreams unless and until 
federal funds are made available. It is not necessary to remind this Committee 
how precarious is the position of the channels allocated for educational tele¬ 
vision. Commercial broadcasters, industry, the armed services, and others 
remind the Federal Communications Commission periodically of the ‘unused 
resource* contained in these channels. This pressure is daily increasing as the 
competition for more room in the spectrum intensifies. This legislation, if 
approved, would give great impetus to educational station activation. In many 
states, the use of public funds to develop educational television stations has 
been delayed, or prevented, by the belief that, if state funds are to be used to 
support educational television, the service must be available to the entire state - 
not merely to those fortunate few who are within the service area of the university, 
or school system, or proposed organization seeking to launch it. Funds of the 
order proposed by the bill, though not sufficient to solve this problem fully, 
would break this deadlock, by making state systems . capable of service to 




-3- 


the majority of the population and the schools of the state, a more realizable 
objective. 

In the past year, the educational forces in various localities have made 
progress in developing the use of television for education, and in organizing 
their limited resources and planning for further development. The NAEB has been 
conducting a continuous study of these efforts and of the multiplying needs which 
impel such efforts. 

The NAEB study indicates that the passage of legislation lending assist¬ 
ance to educational television construction would immediately expedite this 
enormous amount of bogged-down development and create an additional surge 
toward complete and effective use of all the reserved channels. 

The schools, colleges and communities in every state are ready and eager 
to make effective use of these resources for formal and informal education as 
soon as they can be financed. In the several states a variety of actions and 
forces have worked together to weigh the value of this medium to education 
generally and to pave the way for its use. Legislative action, administrative 
order, private philanthropy, and community cooperation have all contributed to 
the preparation that now awaits fulfilment through Congressional action. 

Forty-five states have now actively participated in and supported the 
develop*rent of educational television, and twenty-five of them have formed 
State ETV Commissions by direction of their respective legislatures. In all of 
these states, in some degree or other, the public schools, the institutions of 
higher learning, and the communities have all been involved. 


-4- 


The roll call of the states follows: 

Alabama - In 1953 Alabama established an ETV commission and appro¬ 
priated a total of $ 772 , 000 for a state network. It now has three ETV stations on 
the air and has spent approximately $3, 000, 000 to date on this development. It 
has proven need of at least three more stations at the present time to provide for 
its basic service. 

Arizona - This state has two ETV stations now on the air. The first 
station went on the air in 1959 at the University of Arizona, Tucson; and the 
second station went on the air in February of this year under the auspices of 
Arizona State College at Tempe. The transmitter is actually located in Phoenix 
and serves the entire surrounding community. 

Arkansas - This state has been investigating possibilities of providing 
ETV to its people since 1958; the activities of the state committee established 
by the legislature in 195/ have been recently revived. 

California - In 1952 the Governor appointed an advisory committee on 
ETV, and twice since then the legislature has taken action to encourage its 
development. This state now has ETV broadcasting stations at San Francisco 
and Sacramento, and two more planned at San Bernardino and San Diego. It also 
has several well-developed closed-circuit operations. But the demonstrated need 
for more broadcast stations grows every day. Its largest metropolitan areas are 
not being served. 

Colorado - In 1956 the public school system of Denver put an ETV station 
on the air as a part of its general and adult education program. In 1960 the 
legislature passed an act to allow various school districts to operate television 
translator facilities. At least three more stations are needed now. 







-5- 


Connecticut - In 1958 the Legislative Council, acting on previous 
instructions of the legislature, recommended funds for experiment in ETV. 
Previously the General Assembly had appropriated $150,000 for ETV programming. 

Florida - The legislature first appropriated money for the investigation 
of ETV in 1953 and four years later established a permanent ETV commission and 
initially appropriated $600, 000 for the development and construction of a state 
network. In the meantime, the three large metropolitan areas of the state and 
the two state universities planned and constructed stations on the five available 
ETV channels. The costs of the university stations were derived from state 
sources, and the funds for the stations in Miami, Tampa, St. Petersburg, and 
Jacksonville came from cooperative public school funds, private philanthropy, 
public donations and special state grants • Three more much-needed stations are 
now being planned for the immediate future, but capital outlay financing is still 
a serious problem. 

Georgia - ETV has been encouraged in Georgia since 1953, when funds 
were appropriated for a Continuing Education Center at the University of Georgia. 
In 1958 the Atlanta public schools put a station on the air and developed a pro¬ 
gram service for the schools that is now being widely shared. In 1960 the 
University of Georgia at Athens went on the air with a comprehensive ETV service. 
The State Board of Education has construction permits on channels at Way cross 
and Savannah, and one is being planned in the western part of the state at 
Columbus. If sufficient state funds had been available all of these stations 
would now be in operation; but even so this only touches the need for ETV in 


Georgia 





- 6 - 


Illlnols - The state legislature in 1955 authorized school boards to par¬ 
ticipate in ETV. In 1955 the State University at Urbana went on the air with its 
own ETV station, after winning a long court fight to use general funds. Southern 
Illinois University now has a construction permit for a station at Carbondale. 
Chicago has been operating a cooperative community ETV station since 1955, and 
now the program schedule demands the use of additional channels. 

Iowa - The State University at Ames pioneered in the use of television 
for education, and in 1959 the Des Moines school system went on the air with 
its own station. The University, at Iowa City, has extensive plans, but is 
handicapped by the lack of funds. 

Indiana - This state has constructed no ETV facilities yet, but in 1959 
the legislature authorized public schools to use funds for the production of ^TV 
programming. Production centers have been established at Purdue and Indiana 
Universities, and several public school systems are using ETV programs broad¬ 
cast from commercial stations or coming across state lines from ETV stations 
in Louisville and Chicago. 

Kansas - In 1959 the legislature appropriated $25,000 for the study of 
a state ETV network plan. The study was made over a two-year period and a 
state plan has been recommended to the current legislature. It calls for the con¬ 
struction of six transmitters and three major production centers. The legislature 
is now trying to find funds to make a start on this urgently needed program. In 
the meantime the cities of Wichita, Topeka, and Kansas City have been experi¬ 
menting with ETV in the classroom, with uniformly encouraging results. 






-7- 


Kentuckv - The only station in the state is in Louisville where the public 
school system, with help from a foundation grant and commercial stations, 
operates a modest facility. This year the legislature directed its Research Com*? 
mittee to make a survey of the potential of ETV for Kentucky and the State 
Advisory Committee, appointed by the Lieutenant Governor, is currently develop¬ 
ing a plan for a state ETV network. 

Louisiana - This state has encouraged the development of ETV since 
1952. In 1954 it created the Louisiana ETV Commission, and appropriated $150,000 
for facilities. The state has two ETV stations now operating, but definitely 
needs help for further development. 

Maine - Originally established a state committee on ETV in 1955 
and re-activated it by legislative act in 1957, Much study and planning have 
been accomplished, and now two ETV stations are planned for the near future 
and two additional reservations have been requested for later use. The 
only thing lacking here is sufficient capital funds. 

Massachusetts - The legislature established a commission on ETV in 
1952 and enlarged it in 1953 and provided funds for its work. Legislation 
was enacted to permit public schools to participate financially in ETV pro¬ 
gramming. In 1955 a cooperatively financed ETV station went on the air in 
Boston. 

Michigan - This state is now conducting a study to devise a plan for 
a state-wide ETV service. The study is expected to be completed this year. 

At present ETV stations are on the air in Detroit and East Lansing, and 
stations are being planned in Mount Pleasant and Kalamazoo. 







- 8 - 


Minnesota - Minneapolis and St. Paul put a cooperative community 
ETV station on the air in 1957, and in 1959 the state approved $100,000 toward 
constructing new and better facilities. 

Montana - Received a grant of $25,000 for a detailed study of a 
state plan for ETV. The study has just been completed and plans approved for 
a state network of transmitters and translators which will serve most of the 
people of Montana at a very economical cost. Funds are not now available 
to proceed, but the whole plan could be achieved with Federal assistance. 

Nebraska - ETV has been encouraged here since 1953. The State 
University put its station on the air in 1954, and has since participated in 
extensive planning for the rest of the state. A state plan has been devised 
which will provide basic ETV service to most of the people in Nebraska, and 
an assignment of five more channels strategically located has been requested 
of the FCC. 

New Hampshire - Here the legislature established an ETV Commission 
in 1953. Through its efforts a non-profit corporation was formed to provide 
financial support for the construction of a station. As a result, an ETV channel 
was activated at Durham in 1959. At present facilities are limited and further 
capital outlay needed. 

New lersev - This state did some fine pioneering in using television 
for education. In 1953 the legislature established a Commission for ETV and 
appropriated $75,000 for experimental work. It has several closed-circuit 
operations, but has been unable to get on the air with a broadcast station. 

New Mexico - This state has a very successful cooperative ETV 








operation at Albuquerque which went on the air in 1958, It has a state plan 
for three more stations which will serve m ost of the people ox New Mexico, 
but financing the original construction remains a problem. 

New York - Since 1952 this state has made an effort to establish 
state-wide ETV, but has encountered great difficulty with finances. In 1954 
the Board of Regents was empowered to charter non-profit groups to build and 
operate ETV stations. Three such regional groups have now been chartered 
in the state. There has been a great deal of planning and activity. One 
station is on the air at Buffalo and another is being planned; and two stations 
are being planned in the Schenectady -Albany-Troy area. In addition to this 
there are several large closed-circuit operations and production centers. 

Since 1955 the state has appropriated at various times a total of some 
$1,375,000 for ETV programming in the schools. 

North Carolina - The legislature established an ETV Commission in 
1953 and in the ensuing two years appropriated some $23,000 for its use in 
planning. In 1955 the ETV station at Chapel Hill went on the air with 
variously donated funds, and the legislature appropriated $215,200 for operating 
expenses. The station now receives cooperative support from the state 
system of higher education and from public school participation. 

North Dakota - This state has limited resources but has done some 
planning on ETV and is a member of the planned six-state network. 

Ohio - Every legislature in Ohio since 1953 has given encouragement 
and support to ETV. It is now completing a state plan for extensive use of 
ETV„ Ohio has activated educational channels at Columbus, Cincinnati, 

Sinuons ere now being planned at Dayton, Athens and 


Toledo, and Oxford. 





- 10 " 


Cleveland, 

Oklahoma - Established a state ETV commission in 1953 and went on 
the air with its first station in Oklahoma City in 1956 and its second station 
in Tulsa in 1959, The Oklahoma City schools put a second station on the 
air in Oklahoma City the same year to serve the increasing school needs. 

With these three stations the state still needs more facilities. 

Oregon - ETV has been encouraged and supported by the legislature 
since 1953. The state’s system of higher education established an ETV station 
at Corvallis in 1957. The legislature appropriated funds for programming. 

In 1961 when Portland went on the air with a cooperative station, the legislature 
allocated funds for its programming. Both stations are now part of a state 
system, which needs to expand. 

Pennsylvania - In 1953 the legislature made it possible for public 
schools to participate in the operation of ETV stations. There are now two 
stations in Pittsburgh and one in Philadelphia, and another planned at State 
College. 

Rhode Island - In 1955 the legislature authorized the construction 
of an ETV station under the direction of the State Board of Education. 

$150,000 was appropriated at the time. 

South Carolina - Through various legislative actions since 1953, 
the state has developed an extensive state-wide closed-circuit ETV system, 
and also uses time on commercial stations to broadcast to schools not 


reached by phone lines 







- 11 - 


South Dako ta - The legislature has encouraged ETV since 1954 and in 

1955 appropriated funds for a closed-circuit installation at the State University 
at. Vermillion, The support of this operation led to the planning of a broadcast 
station and tills year another ETV channel will be activated there. 

Tenn e ssee - In 1955 the state established an ETV Commission and 
appropriated funds for matching contribution toward ETV station operation. In 

1956 the cooperative community ETV station went on the air in Memphis. Plans 
are now under way for stations at Nashville* Knoxville and Chattanooga. 

Texas - There have been many approaches to ETV in Texas. The State 
University has a fine production center and is the hub of an institutional 
closed-circuit network. There are now ETV broadcast stations on the air at 
Houston, Dallas and Richardson, and another is on the way in the Austin - 
San Antonio area. Support is here but this large state needs many more station 

Utah - This state has two ETV stations on the air at Salt Lake City 
and at Ogden, Another one is planned at Ogden, and one at Logan. The 
University at Provo has also put in its bid for a station. The State Legislature 
supports the operation of the University station. 

Vermont - This state has had a special Commission on ETV since 1954 
and it is still trying to find ways and means to activate a station. 

Virgini a - The legislature passed a bill authorizing state support for 
ETV in 1959, but the act was vetoed. Local groups are still working to 
establish stations. ETV is being used in Norfolk and surrounding school 
districts and in Richmond. These communities are ready for their own stations 








12 - 


Washlnqton - Has had state support and encouragement In the 
development of ETV since 1954, The first ETV channel was activated at the 
University of Washington in Seattle in 1954, and six years later the second 
station went on the air in Tacoma. Since then Tacoma School District #10 
has received a construction permit to establish a third station. Extensive 
planning and experimentation has continued at Pullman and Spokane in the 
Eastern part of the state. But much remains to be done. 

Wisconsin - This state, through its long-established Radio Council, 
has a comprehensive state plan, but has been unable to appropriate funds for 
activation. The ETV station at the University of Wisconsin went on the air 
in 1954, and the legislature has regularly appropriated operational funds for 
it. Milwaukee put Wisconsin’s second station on the air with public school 
funds in 1957, and now the program schedule is so heavy a second channel 
has been requested to handle the school broadcasts. 

Surely this brief survey of the interest and activities in the several 
states indicates a readiness for the proposed legislation. On the other hand, 
there is ample evidence that any prolonged delay in ETV legislation would have 
serious adverse consequences. 

Most of the states and many of the localities throughout the country 
have done a great deal of preliminary planning for ETV looking toward the 
time when Federal assistance would be made available. In many areas local 
effort has been kept alive for the past two years by the promise of ETV 
legislation. Much preliminary legislative support in the states, and 
promises of ETV operating support, have been based upon the hopes of Federal 




-13- 


assistance. If congressional action fails again at this time, or were to be 
postponed through another Congress, much of the work and planning of the 
past two years would be lost. The educational and community interests 
w orking for ETV would lose much of their legislative support to other programs 
This would be especially difficult to overcome in the states which have 
biennial legislatures. The time, energy and local money lost to the develop¬ 
ment of ETV would be incalculable if there were to be any great delay in 
Federal assistance. 

There are 28 states where substantial investments have already been 
made in ETV. These include 7 western states, 8 mid-western states, 4 
eastern states, and 9 southern states. But in all of these states further 
development is new largely dependent on Federal assistance and in many 
instances a prolonged delay would seriously retard program development and 
cooperative schooljutllization. 

There are 21 localities which have applied for ETV station Construction 
Permits or which have asked for specific channels to be reserved preliminary 
to applying, and in most instances the action was based upon the hopes of 
the proposed legislature. Postponement at this point would seriously 
jeopardize these developments. Tnere are 26 states which have either 
state or local planning for new ETV development which is contingent upon 
Federal assistance. In many of these, planning has advanced to a critical 
stage, and prolonged delay would be disastrous, and in any event would 
retard beginning development through another biennium. A listing of some 


of those states will better illustrate the situation: 


-14- 


Kansas - this state has a state plan to provide much-needed ETV 
facilities to 85% of its population. The legislature can see its way clear 
to provide only 1/6 of the development money needed in the hope that Federal 
assistance will add enough to make an encouraging start. Delay now will 
jeopardize two years* work* and may cause the loss of several of the proposed 
channels to commercial interests • One such channel is already slipping away 
from the State schools. 

Kentucky - this state is currently developing a plan for an ETV 
network. However, a favorable frequency, basic to the state plan, is already 
slipping away, and a group of frequencies upon which this network plan 
depends will be in jeopardy if applications for the channels are long delayed. 

Nebraska - this state has a plan similar to the Kansas plan, but it 
is entirely dependent upon taking immediate advantage of specific unassigned 
VHF channels. The state's claim is now being contested, and lack cf funds 
or delay in development will undoubtedly cause the loss of these channels. 
Here, as in Kansas, the loss of one or two channels would wreck the whole 
State Plan. 

New Mexico — this state has built one ETV station and has plans 
developed to furnish service to all the schools in the state, but it cannot 
build the other two stations without assistance, and again delay endangers 
the necessary channels. 

Maine - this state has a plan, but has been unable to build 
stations to meet its needs. It is having difficulties defending its proposed 
use of good channels. Delay at this time weakens Maine's chances of 
effective ETV development. 








-15- 


Montana - this state, with a foundation grant, has developed a 
very economical and effective state plan. Its development depends on out¬ 
side assistance, and the key channel could be lost by delay. 

Tennessee - has two channel 2*s which are being eyed by commercial 
interests - these are part of a state plan which must have Federal assistance 
to get off the ground. 

Florida . Georgia . Alabama - all have advanced State Plans and large 
developments, but all need assistance to preserve their gains and meet their 
increasing needs. 

Mississippi. Arkansas. Wyoming & Idaho - all are just beginning tp 
get organized for ETV. Their only hope is outside assistance, and inordinate 
delay will set them back considerably. 

New York . Michigan. Wisconsin & Texas - have all made good 
starts, but are now, for diverse reasons, at a critical point where no effective 
progress can be made without some help. These are comparatively rich 
states, but at this point seed money is essential; and delay in all of these 
areas puts serious pressure on the reserved channels. 

Nineteen states now have more or less elaborate State Plans for ETV, 
or are in the planning stage. In every instance some phase of the planning 
hinges upon immediate Federal assistance. 

There are several states, such as West Virginia and Idaho, where 
interest has been kindled only because of the hope of the proposed legislation „ 
These states cannot possibly have any development through local resources 
unless and until outside assistance is available. Postponement now would 
probably destroy the possibility for years. 















- 16 - 


The sum of this recital is that all over the country work and plans 
for ETV development have been sparked by the hope and promise of Federal 
legislation, A large proportion of the plans have been guided by this 
promise. The time is crucial, as the description of the situation in the 
several states and many localities indicates. Another postponement, or 
serious delay, at this time would seriously handicap this development for 
years - in some cases, many years. In addition to this, there is always 
the threat of losing the reserved channels, or of being too late to drop-in 
a necessary channel. 

The need is now, and a dollar now would be worth several in the 
future. There is a time for all progressive developments to move. ETV 
has reached that critical moment - it moves now, or endangers its total 


progress 



March 31, 1961 


Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 
DuPont Circle Office Building 
13^6 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Harold: 

Thanks for your March 28th note. Last week arrangements 
were made for Senator Bricker to contact the two Ohio 
members of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign 
Commerce expressing his views on the legislation which 
he originally sponsored. 

Senator Bricker, as you may know, is on the University 
Board of Trustees. 


Si neere 1y, 



Richard B. Hull 


RBH/mh 


Teaching Aids Laboratory • Office of Seminars and Workshops • Ohio School of the Air • Video Recording • WOSU — WOSU-TM — WOSU-TV • Closed Circuit TV 




O Vvy, & ^ "E cA * 

4^ 




w*-** c^ ^ < 

^ jh/h*~ /fo Awt^w»Xf 

W* £jl$ZZ~™ s 


William G. Harley Remarks for Hearings on S205 


March 1, 1961 




I am William G. Harley, president of the National Association 


$Wv Vfav**- 


e National Association 


of Educational Broadcasters, I ask permission to have inserted 


in the record o f - t he s e -heayirags two letters and a statement 
from our organization. 


ua^JXL-*^w X-y * Vv ' rw 

The letters are addressefl ~ tirW from thepresent president 

to, 

of the United States, and a former vice president and candidate j'- ^ / v ' V4 ' wfc ^ 


for t he o ffLi.ee a£ president. 

In preparation for our national convention last October, 
i Jukikli i4a comments from both candidates concerning their 


views on federal aid to educational television development. 

jV^UM^wU^IVW 

Both sent affirmative statements which were- read- t o our co a- 

-tu,v /ly*. jLl* CaaTv- tWv X<v4 Kvw /tsc*\ 5 \ 

vont Iron. i * 


WItb^-r-efe r en c e ~ to~-th i s he a ring , I should like to read 
pertinent portions from both replies. 


^ L KENNEDY 5 LETTER 

’’Today our schools and colleges face a crisis of appalling 
proportions in terms of deficits in dollars, teachers, class¬ 
rooms and services. American progress and even our national 
survival is directly dependent on what we as a nation do now 
about the shameful weaknesses and deficiencies of our educational 
system. 


”We must seize all means at hand to help education cope 
with these /Lire shortages and improve both the quality and 
quantity of educational opportunities available to our citizens 
at all i&vels, both in and out of school. 












- 2 - 


"Television, a device which has the potential to teach more 
things to more people in less time than anything yet devised, 
seems a providential instrument to come to educations aid. 
Educational television has already proved that it can be a 
valuable supplement to formal education and a direct medium for 
non-formal education. 

"Despite the heroic efforts of people such as yourselves 
to establish educational television stations across the United 
States, only a small part of the total potential has been 
achieved. To date, only 50 of the 267 channels reserved for 
education have been activated and 2/3 of the population still 
has no access to educational television service. This is not 
for lack of zeal or interest on the part of educators or state 
or local officials, but, primarily, for lack of funds for the 
initial capital investment required for construction of stations. 

"Since education is a matter of national concern, the 
Federal Government should assist in expediting and accelerating 
the use of television, as a tested aid to education in the 
schools and colleges of the nation and as a means of meeting 
the needs of adult education. I pledge you that I will back"— 
actively suitable legislation aimed at this objective in the 
next session of the Congress and will urge its support by my 
Democratic colleagues." J F t 

Here is a portion of the letter from the~the» ^vice—pr^si- 

*)w-v » V\Ax"^ f ‘ V “\ t 

4ent~. 

NIXON LETTER 

"The headlines almost daily remind us of the challenges 
which our children and our children*s children face in the 



years ahead. To meet these challenges the continued strengthen¬ 
ing of our educational system is of crucial importance. We-now 
have in thiscountry the resources and the technical means of 
granting to every citizen of our country his birthright —• the 
right to adequate education. All tested means of aiding and 
improving instruction must be given support and encouragement. 

We must also be ingenious in using radio and television. They 
are proved instructional tools which have an immense potential 
for the benefit of American education and the welfare of our 
country. 

”1 pledge my cooperation in the development of a national 
education television policy to help realize the goal of the 
fullest possible educational opportunity for every American. 

This policy should set forth the basic objectives of the Nation in 
the field of educational television and it should define respective 
roles of the Federal and other levels of government, broad¬ 
casters, educational institutions and others concerned. Within 
its assigned role Federal assistance in the stimulation of 
the use of television as an aid to education will have my 
sympathy and support.” V 

I submit, gentlemen, that as statements from the spokesman 
of both the major political parties, these letters indicate 
strong bi-partisan support for federal assistance in fostering 
the full development of an establishment for the public benefit 
which is recognized by leaders of both parties as a vital force 
in the strengthening of American education and the survival of ^ , JL 
our nation. \ T~ 

£^| > »» • 


Testimony on 


A BILL TO EXPEDITE UTILIZATION OF TELEVISION TRANSMISSION 
FACILITIES IN OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES, 

AND IN ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS 

before the 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE 
SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES 

March 1-2, 1961 

By 

John F. White, President 
National Educational Television and Radio Center 

My name is John W'hite. I am the President of the 
National Educational Television and Radio Center. The Center serves 
as program network headquarters and leading spokesman for fifty of the 
fifty-four non-commercial educational television stations across the 
country. W 7 e are an independent non-profit corporation and have been 
in operation since 1952. A list of our Board of Directors--composed 
of leading educators, prominent businessmen, and other distinguished 
persons--is attached to the transcript of this Testimony. We have 
constantly moved forward and our growth continues. Six years ago 
there were four educational television stations on the air. Four years 
ago there were twenty. One year ago there were forty-five. Last 
month in Portland, Oregon, the fifty-fourth station began its first 
telecast. 


One of our major responsibilities to the network of 


educational television stations is that of providing ten hours each week 


2 - 


of filmed and videotaped programming. This programming is derived 
from the finest talents and production facilities available throughout 
the country. On occasion our commercial colleagues have developed 
programs for our use. Also, we have acquired many of the fine programs 
being produced in European countries and Canada. 

In addition to furnishing this program service, we work 
to help stations help themselves and also to assist communities and 
educational agencies in their efforts to activate stations. To this end, 
we frequently provide consultation services, sponsor meetings and 
conferences, and supply literature and training aids, As an extension 
of this service, we established on February 1 a Washington office and 
absorbed the professional staff of the Joint Council on Educational 
Television. This new office is located in the American Council on 
Education building at 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, N. W. , Washington, D. C. 

These various activities have given us intimate knowledge 
of the significant growth of educational television stations; we know 
their successes and potentials; we also know their problems and the 
obstacles they face. It is against such a background that this Testimony 
is submitted. 


V; hile the growth in numbers of educational television 
stations has been dramatic, it should be noted that many of the idle 


- 3 - 


reserved channels demand activation if the schools and colleges, as 
well as children and adults at home, are to benefit from this powerful 
instrument of communication. 

One might say merely that other communities and 
educational institutions should follow the lead of those that have activated 
stations, but a look at the map and the educational television allocations 
suggests strongly that they cannot do so without special aid. As of 
today, every VHF reserved channel in cities of 300, 000 population and 
over has been activated, with the exception of the one in Kanoas^^Girty, 
where an activating group is now hard at work. The remaining assign¬ 
ments in large cities are UHF in VHF markets, ^nd it is extremely 
difficult to obtain local citizen support for a station that the viewer at 
home cannot see unless he spends $50.00 to convert his set to UHF. 

Even here, more often than not, limited operational dollars are obtainable 
from schools for whom direct services would be performed. But the 
participation of individual citizens is negligible because adult education 
and cultural programming would not be readily available to them. Thus, 
in such cities as New York, Washington, Cleveland and Los Angeles 
the schools also are denied full-scale service. 

Beyond this, one finds blank spots on the ETV map-- 
blank spots that represent the smaller communities and sparsely 
settled regions where educational and cultural resources also are 


4 - 


limited. Here too, of course, construction dollars are difficult to 
obtain, but the service that activated ETV stations, sharing the resources 
of educational and cultural centers, could provide for people in these 
areas would be tremendous. And the need for this service will be even 
greater in the years ahead when our schools are crowded and adequate 
teaching staffs are not easy to come by. 

The value of the service rendera>le by such stations has 
already been demonstrated and testified to in these hearings. There is 
no better evidence than the fact that two cities--Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma--are now served by two educational 
stations each because their schools required even more help than one 
could provide. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Dade County, Florida, and the 
Florida State Educational Television Commission also have recently 
applied for additional educational channels, and other communities will 
be following in their steps. 

Interconnections among the stations in a state or region 
will be necessary too if the smaller communities to which I referred 
earlier are to receive the rich service available from schools, universi¬ 
ties, colleges, libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions 
of the larger state and regional population centers. The advantages of 
such an arrangement already are being realized in the State of Alabama, 
whose three educational television stations are interconnected. In 


- 5 - 


addition, the ETV stations in Boston, Massachusetts, and Durham, 

New Hampshire, those in Jacksonville and Gainesville, Florida, 
and those in Sacramento and San Francisco, California, share their 
resources through live interconnection. 

As you gentlemen know, the early stimulation of ETV 
was aided immeasurably by large grants from The Fund for Adult 
Education, which gave money for station activation on a matching 
basis to communities and institutions. The Ford Foundation, through 
its various funds, has contributed nearly fifty million dollars to the 
ETV movement. It made these grants because it believed that television 
could make an immense contribution to American education at all levels 
and that this new educational tool had to be developed. The Fund for 
Adult Education is now being dissolved and The Ford Foundation is 
turning to other areas of interest in the honest belief that its task of 
launching the movement and proving its effectiveness has been completed. 
The Foundation cannot, it should not, undertake the total task itself, 
for financing as well as utilization must be shared if ultimate success 
is to be achieved. 

Therefore, the total job can be completed only if the 
f ederal government in the public interest assumes some responsibility 
for the stimulation of ETV, and accepts a share of the financing of its 
development. Of the fifty-four stations on the air, approximately 


6 


40 per cent are integral parts of universities and derive their 
operational dollars from university budgets. Approximately 20 per 
cent are controlled by and receive operating dollars from public 
school systems. The remaining 40 per cent, located for the most 
part in larger cities--such as Boston, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Minneapolis - 
St. Paul, New Orleans, St. Louis, San Francisco--are independently 
organized, non-profit corporations that receive capital and operating 
funds in return for services performed for educational institutions , 
as well as through voluntary contributions from independent citizens 
and industry. Thus, the total picture is one of diversified control 
and support. This, in our opinion, is to be desired, for just as public 
and private educational institutions in America have served to bolster, 
challenge, and lead one another, so, too, do these stations. This 
diversity must be preserved, but in the spirit of its G. I. bills, its 
research grants to universities, and its Morrill Acts, the federal 
government should make money available without federal control to 
bring into full effectiveness this important American educational 
movement. 


The National Educational Television and Radio Center 
congratulates the authors of this Bill and urges its passage. We would 
prefer that the Bill, in its final implementation, provide that state 
plans for use of the dollars be submitted and approved before the 
grants are made. In this way, we believe,the American people can 


7 - 


be assured of the most effective expenditure in terms of the best 
possible state-wide service. Such state plans could include station 
establishment, improvement, and linkage. Furthermore, we would 
prefer that grants be made on a matching basis, for these federal 
dollars can best be used to stimulate, not substitute for, local 
initiative. If state and/or local institutions, or non-profit foundations 
organized for the purpose, are required to match dollars for con¬ 
struction, they are more likely to recognize their responsibility for 
the adequate financing of that station* s later operation. At the same 
time, it is our conviction that there should be no penalty placed upon 
those who already have shown initiative in the activation of stations. 
Hence, we believe that adequate credit in any matching funds formula 
should be given for prior investment and that grant money should be 
available for improved power and equipment for existing stations. 

If Congress fails to pass this legislation, it could well 
mean that many Americans will be deprived, for many years, of the 
educational television service they desire and need--in their elementary 
and secondary schools, in their colleges, and in their homes. We urge 
your support. 

Respectfully submitted 


John F. White 


National Educational Television and Radio Center 
Board of Directors 


Ralph Lowell, Chairman, Board of Directors; Chairman, Boston 
Safe Deposit and Trust Co., Boston, Mass. 

Everett N. Case, President, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York 

Norman Cousins, Editor, The Saturday Review, New York, New York 

Darwin S. Fenner, Vice President, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Smith, Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana 

Leland Hazard, Director-Consultant, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Harold D. Lasswell, Law School, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 

Lloyd S. Michael, Superintendent, Evanston Township High School 
Evanston, Illinois 

George E. Probst, Executive Director, Thomas Alva Edison Foundation, 
Inc., New York, New York 

Glenn T. Seaborg, Chancellor, University of California, Berkeley, 

Calif. 

George N. Shuster, President Emeritus, Hunter College, New York, N. Y. 

Mark Starr, Educational Director, International Ladies' Garment 
Workers' Union (1925-60) 

Herman B Wells, President, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 

John F. White, President, National Educational Television and Radio Center 

Raymond H. Wittcoff, President, Transurban Investment Corporation 



HEARINGS ON 


S. 205, To expedite the utilization of television transmission 
facilities in our public schools and colleges, and in 
adult training programs. 


WITNESS LIST 


Wednesday, March 1, 1961 

Hon. John Sherman Cooper, United States Senator from Kentucky 

Mr. John Schwarzwalder, Manager, KTCA-TV, St. Paul, Minnesota, accompanied 
by Mr. William Harley, President, National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. James Aubrey, President, CBS-Television, 485 Madison Ave., New York, 

N. Y* 

\ Hon. Lee Metcalf, United States Senator from Montana, accompanied by Mr. 
Erling Jorgenson, Director, Montana Educational Project, Montana 
State University, Missoula, Montana 

Dr. Charles H. Boehm, Superintendent of Public Instruction for Pennsylvania, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

✓y^Mrs. Robert Hornung, President, Greater Cleveland Television Education 
Association, Cleveland, Ohio 

Mr. G e org e- B rain, Superintendent, Baltimore City Schools, Baltimore, Md. 

1 y Mr. Loren Stone, Manager, KCTS-TV, Seattle, Washington 

Thursday, March 2, 1961 

/ Mr. John L. Burns, President, Radio Corporation of America, 30 Rockefeller 
Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Mrs. Edmund D. Campbell, The Greater Washington Educational TV Associa¬ 
tion, Inc., Raleigh Hotel, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Bernard Everett, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Newton, Mass. 

j Mr. Joseph Baudino, Vice President, Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., 1625 
K Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 


Mr. Frederick Ford, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission, ac¬ 
companied by Mr. Rosel Hyde, FCC Commissioner, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Alison G. Bell, Legislative Associate, American Association of 
University Women, 2401 Virginia Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C. 


1 


Mr. Mort Zimmerman, President, Electron Corporation, P. 0. Box 5570, 
Dallas, Texas 





1456 


STATEMENT OF NEWTON N. KNOW, CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL 
^ScATIONS COMMISSION .TOTHE COMMITTEE ON 
INTERSTATE AM) FOREIGN COMMERCE, UNITED STATES 
SENATE, ON S. 205, 87TH CONGRESS, A BILL TO 
EXPEDITE THE UTILIZATION OF TELEVISION TRANS¬ 
MISSION FACILITIES IN OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS AM) 
COLLEGES AND IN ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS 


March 7, 1961 

Having assumed office on March 2, 1961, I was unable to connect 
on the above bill at the same time as my colleagues. But because of the 
immense importance I attach to this legislation, I take the liberty of 
transmitting this statement to you in the hope that it may still be 
considered by the Committee. 

I join Conmissioner Hyde in urging the use of Federal funds for 
educational television. I believe, with him, that a widely available 
and adequately financed non-commercial educational television service is 
vitally necessary to improve our educational and conmunications system. 
Through such a service, our nation may have an unparalleled opportunity 
for education, for experimental programming, for real diversification of 
program fare, and for cultural advancement. In view of the present lack 
of funds in many areas to meet station construction costs, I believe that 
Federal aid is needed, particularly to advance the date of construction 
and to permit extensive rather than minimal operation. I recognize, of 
course, that the amount of funds to be allocated this project as against 
other worthwhile legislative programs is a matter for the judgment of the 
Congress. But I do wholeheartedly endorse the use of Federal funds to 
aid in establishing or improving educational television broadcasting 


facilities, 




New Roberts Bill Introduced 


H. R. 132 of the 87th Congress, 1st session is a modified 
bill by Congressman Kenneth A. Roberts (D.-Ala.) and has been 
referred to the Committ# on Interstate & Foreign Commerce. This 
bill retains the provisions of the old Roberts bill as regards the 
amounts of money for survey ($10,000) and purchase of facilities 
($1,000,000), but has some interesting and important changes and 
additions in its other provisions. 

In the present bill all applications for grants must be 
made by and through a "duly constituted State educational tele¬ 
vision agency." Another change is the requirement of matching 
funds for the $10,000 survey grants. 

There is also a new requirement that all projects asking 
for grants must be approved by the duly constituted State ETV 

4 

agency as having been included in the State Plan which must be 
submitted by the State ETV Agency before any State becomes eli¬ 
gible for grants. The State ETV Agency is charged with making 
determination of priorities in case more applications for grants 
are submitted than funds are available. 

Perhaps the most significant change in the new Roberts bill 
is in the formula for matching grants. It is now proposed that 
50% of the approved cost of a project be paid by Federal funds 
plus an additional allowance of 25% of the cost of any ETV facil¬ 
ities owned by the applicant on the date of filing. But in no 
case may the total amount of Federal funds exceed 75% of the 
approved cost of the project. 

In this new bill ETV facilities are more broadly defined to 
include towers, microwave equipment, and video-tape recording 



equipment. But it does not include any construction or repair 
of housing of any kind. 

A broad liberal definition is also established for eligible 
community ETV organizations. Other, than these changes, the bill 
is essentially the same as the Roberts Bill offered in the 86th 
Congress and modified so drastically in Committee. 


STATEMENT 


h: Th& Committee on Bcrteretate and Foreign Commerce, U.S. House of 
Representatives, M^xfcy-seventh Congress, First Session. 

Bf: Ihe National Association of Educational Broadcasters: 

Vernon Bronson, Consultant and Survey Coordinator. 

ON: HR-132, Providing Grants for Educational ^television Broadcast 
Facilities, and Related Bills 

It Has been suggested that the survey now being conducted by the 
NAEB, to determine the needs of education for television spectrum space 
may be offered as a reason to withhold judgment, on the educational tele¬ 
vision bills now before the House and Senate, on the grounds that until 
this survey is completed, no valid relationship can be established between 
Federal aid and the need for such aid. 

Such an atmaaption is entirely without fact. The MSB spectrum 
survey has no direct relationship to the basic development proposed by the 
Magnuson Bill (S3D5), the Roberts Mil (H.R. 132} and the others. Our 
survey is designed to determine: X. What re-armsgement of channel alloca¬ 
tions can be effected to provide the ndnimum basic service for education; 

2. The number of additional channels over and above the basic service which 
will ;be necessary to serve the needs of education in the 10-15 years insaed- 
iately ahead; 3 . tot plan of allocations can be devised to equitably 
provide such channels. 

Our survey is looking to the next decade and beyond. Meanwhile 
there is imperative need to put on the air channels for which allocations 
have already been made. Today, as you know, there are 21% channels assigned 





to education which are still unused. The need for activation of these channels 
as soon as possible and the necessity for financial assistance in the several 
state© to bring this about has already been established. 

Mich has been accomplished throughout the country in the way ofa 
beginning development, and much more toward preliminary plann ing for future 
development and use of the educational television channels; but because of the 
limited resources of the states has became increasingly difficult to finance 
the original capital outlay needed for the construction of facilities. 

In spite of this, however, a great deal has been done. !Sbe schools, 
colleges and coraamities in every state are ready and eager to make effective 
use of these resources for formal and informal education as soon as they can 
be financed. In the several states a variety of actions and a variety of 
forces have worked together to weigh the value of this medium to education 
generally and to pave the way for its use. Legislative action, administra¬ 
tive order, private philanthropy, and cacmmity cooperation have all con¬ 
tributed to the preparation that now awaits fulfilment through Congressional 
action. 

Forty-five states have now actively participated in and supported 
the development of educational television, and. twenty-five of them have formed 
State ETV Commissions by direction of their respective legislatures. In all 
of these states, in some degree or other, the public schools, the institutions 
of higher learning and the communities have all been involved. 

The rail-call of the states follows j 

Alabama - in 1953 Alabama established an ETV Cozsnission and appro¬ 


priated a total of $772,000. for a state network. It new has 3 ETV stations 










on the air and has spent approximately 3 million dollars to date m this 
developaent. It has proven need of at least 3 more stations at the present 
time to provide for its basic service. 

Arizona - WLa state has two ETV stations now os the air. The first 
station went on the air is 1959 at the University of ibrizona, toson; and the 
second static went os the air is Februaiy of this year wider the auspices of 
Arizona State College at tope, to transmitter is actually located in 
Huoenix and serves the entire mirrounding eossmmity. 

A rk a n sas - r JOds state has heea investigating possibilities of 
providing ETV to its people since 195&, the activities of the State Committee 
established by the Legislature in 191? have been recently revived. 

California - In 1952 the Governor appointed an advisory committee 
on ETV, and twice since then the Legislature has taken action to encourage 
its developaent. Hits state now has ETV broadcasting stations at San Francisco 
and Sacramento and 2 scare planned at San Bernardino and San Diego. It also 
has several well-developed closed-circuit operations. But the demonstrated 
need tor more broadcast stations grows every day. Its largest metropolitan 
aims are not being served. 

Colorado • In 1956 the public school system of Denver put an ETV 
on the air as a part of its general and adult education program. In i 960 the 
Legislature passed an act to allow various school districts to operate television 
translator facilities. At least 3 more stations are needed now. 

Connecticut - In 1958 the Legislative Council, acting on previous 
instructions of the Legislature, recommended Asads for experlmerct In ETV* 
Previously the General Assembly had appropriated $150,000. tar ETV programming. 








Florida * Sis first msm& fear toe to- 

wstigattan of BOT to 1953 sad four year® later established a xjervamnt 
OTf CeemdsaioKi and apipro^rtotc^ m initial ,f^00,000. far the dtostoopMS* 
and construction of a State xwtraerfc. to the mmtSjm, the three U&xm 
is^rapoOltan area® off the State and the 2 State l&iwrsitto® planned and 
coosfciiKted stations on the five available .STV ctonaals. She costa of the 
Qhirarsity stations mare derived from state source®, and the toads tor the 
stations to ffimi, Stospt, St* Petersburg, and Ohatofinvllle caase toon coopera¬ 
tive public school toad®, private gMQMtaq^ public delation* and special 
stole grants. E&ra© am Mtc^oaeded stations are new being planned for the 
tffltdtoe Mbxs* but capital out toy financier to still a serious problem. 

Georgia - ISST tom been encouraged to GkKxrgto since 2953, shea 
toads mm tor a Oosstimitog Btocstim Center at toe ^diversity 

of Oeco^to* to 3958 toe Jttoiata jpi f ht jf* gabels put. & gn <» 4 » 

has developed a program msrlm tor toe schools toot to nos beii^ widely 
stored, to 3$60 the University of Georgia at Jttoas vent cm toe. air with 
a coB®retoaeiTC SSV .service, toe Stoto Board of Bhicsbioii has construction 

toe wmtetm port of toe stole at Ooltsabus. If su^etent stole funds tod 
beast available all of these stations would new be ia operation; bat even 
so tots only touches the need for E3Y in Georgia. 

Tii 1 tmgt« w 3m stole legislature in 1955 iwtoerissfl b oa r d s 

t© partoedpoto in MPT. la 1955 toe State l&dtvemity si UAna wat on to© 
air with its ©urn WSf statical, after stoning a long court fight to use general 
fundsfc Southern mined® lifciversity nos has a construction paradt for a 
station at Carbotoale. Chicago has been operating a cooperative comanaity E3V 







statical since 1955, and now the program schedule demands the use of additional 
channels. 


Iowa - Ohe State tfc&versity at i&aes pioneered in the use of tele¬ 
vision for education, and in 1959 the Des Moines school system vent on the 
air with its own staticat. Hie University at Iowa City has extensive plans, 
tut is handicapped by the lack of funds- 

Indtaaa - Ms state has constructed no ETV facilities yet, hut 
in 1959 the Legislature authorized public schools to use funds for the pro¬ 
duction of ET? programming. Production centers have been established at 
Purdue and Indiana Universities, and several public school systems are 
using ET? programs broadcast from commercial stations or coming across state 
lines from ETV stations in Louisville and Chicago. 

Efonsas - In 1959 the legislature appropriated $25,000. for the 
study of a state ETV network plan. The study was made over a 2-year period 
and a state plan has been recommended to the current legislature. It calls 
for the construction of £ transmitters and three major production centers. 
She legislature is now trying to find enough funds to make a start on this 
urgently needed program. In the meantime the cities of Wichita, Topeka, and 
Kfcasaa City have been experimenting with ET? in the classroom, with uni¬ 
formly encouraging results. 

Louisiana - This state has encouraged the development of ST? since 
1952. In 1954 it created the Louisiana ET? Cciaaission, and appropriated 
funds in the amount of $150,000. for facilities. The state has two ETV 
stations lnov operating, but definitely needs help for further development. 









Mhtae - Originally established a state committee on ETV in 1955 


and re-activated it by legislative act in 1957 * Muck study and planning have 
been accomplished, and now two ETV stations are in the making for the near 
future and 2 additional reservations have been requested for later use. The 
only thing lacking here is sufficient capital funds, 

Massachusetts - The legislature established a coctai sslon on ETV 
in 1952 and enlarged it la 1953 and provided funds for its work. Legislation 
was enacted to permit public schools to participate financially in ETV pro¬ 
gramming. Ia 1955 & cooperatively financed ETV station went oa the air in 
Boston. 

Michigan - This state is now conducting a study to devise a plan 
for a state-wide ETV service. The study is expected to be completed this 
year. At present ETV stations are on the air in Detroit and East Iansing, 
and stations are being planned ia Mount Pleasant and Kalamazoo. 

Mjnnesafca - Minneapolis and St. Rwil ^rt cooperative community 
EN station oaa the air ia 1957 , aad ia 1959 the state approved $100,000 toward 
constructing new and better facilities. 

Montana - Received a grant of $25,000. to make a detailed study of 
state plan for ETV. The study has just been completed and plans approved 
for state network of transmitters and translator® which will serve most of 
the people of Montana at a very sconced cal cost. Binds are not now available 
to proceed, but the whole plan could be achieved with some Federal assistance. 

Hehraska - ETV to been encouraged here since 1953* The ftate 
university put its station oa the air ia 195 ^ and has since participated ia 
extensive planning for the rest of the state. 1 A state plan has been devised 












which will provide basic ETV service to most of the people in Nebraska, and 
an assignment of 5 more channels strategically located has been requested of 
the FCC. 


Hew Hampshire - Here the Legislature established an ETV Com¬ 
mission in 1953* Through its efforts a non-profit corporation was formed 
to provide financial support for the construction of a station. As a re¬ 
sult, an ETV channel was activated at Durham in 1959# At present facilities 
are limited and further capital outlay needed. 

Hew Jersey - This state did some ft m pioneering in using tele¬ 
vision for education. In 1953 the Legislature established a Commission 
for ETV and appropriated $75,OCX), for experimental work. It has several 
closed-circuit operations, but has been unable to get on the air with a 
broadcast station. 


Hew Mexico - This state has a very successful cooperative ETV 
operation at Albuquerque which went on the air in 195$ • It has a state plan 
for 3 more stations which will serve most of the people of Hew Mexico, tat 
financing the original construction remains a problem. 

Hew York - Since 1952 this state has made an effort to establish 
state-wide ETV, tat has encountered great difficulty with finances. In 1954 
the Board of Regents was es^xawered to charter non-profit groups to build and 
operate ETV stations. Three such regional groups have now been chartered 
in the state. There has been a great deal of planning and activity. One 
station is on the air at Buffalo and another is being planned; and Z stations 
are being planned in the Sefoenectady-AIbany-Troy area. In addition to this 
there are several large closed-circuit operations and production centers. 










-a- 


Since 1955 the state Ms appropriated at various times a total of some 
$1*375,000* for ETV programming la the schools. 

North Carolina - Hie Legislature established an ETV Cociaissioa la 
1953 dad la the ensuing 2 years appropriated some $ 23 , 000 . for its use in 
planning. In 1955 the ETV station at Chapel Hill went on the air with 
variously donated funds, and the Legislature appropriated $215,200. for 
operating expenses. She station near receives cooperative support from the 
state system of higher education and from public school participation. 

North Sakata - Me state has many handicaps hut has done sense 
planning on ETV and is a member of the planned six-state network. 

Ohio - Every legislature In Ohio since 1953 has given encourage¬ 
ment and support to ETV. It is now completing a state plan for extensive 
use of ETV. Ohio has activated educational channels at Columbus, Cincinnati, 
Toledo, and Oxford. Stations are now being planned at Layton, Athens, and 
Cleveland. 


gOahotaa - Established the state ETV commission in 1953 and went 
on the air with its first station In Oklahoma City in 1956 and Its second 
statical in Tulsa in 1959* Ihe Oklahoma. City schools put a second station on 
the air in Oklahoma City the same year to serve the increasing school needs. 
Htth these 3 stations the state needs more facilities. 

Oregon - ETV has been encouraged and supported by the Legislature 
since 1953* The state*« system of higher education established an ETV statical 
at Corvallis in 1957* The Legislature appropriated funds for prograasaing. 

In 1961 when Bortland went on the air with a cooperative station, the Legis¬ 
lature allocated funds for its prograaming. Both stations are now part of 
a state system, which needs to expand. 












Pennsylvania - In 1953 the legislature raade it possible for public 
schools to participate in the operation of ETV stations. There are now 2 
stations in Pittsburgh and one in miadelphia, and another planned at State 
College. 

Rhode Island - In 1955 the Legislature authorized the construction 
of an station under the direction of the State Board of Education. One 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars were appropriated at the time. 

South Carolina . * through various legislative actions since 1953* 
the state now has developed an extensive state-wide closed-circuit 32PV system, 
and also uses time on ccasBercial stations to broadcast to schools not reached 
by phone lines. 

South Dakota - f ihe Legislature has encouraged ETV since 195^ and in 
1955 appropriated funds for a closed-circuit installation at the State Uaiversity 
at Veraillion. Ttm support of this operation led to the planning of a broad¬ 
cast station and this year another ETV channel will be activated there. 

Itenaeasee - In 1955 the state established an EOT CcEBiission and 
appropriated funds for matching contribution toward ETV station operation. 

In 1956 the cooperative cosammity ETV station went 0 ® the air in Masphis. 

Elans are now under way for stations at Hashvllle, Khoocville and Chattanooga. 

tecas - Ohere have been many approaches to EOT in Texaa. OSie State 
University has a fine production center and is the lab of an institutional 
closed-circuit network. Shere are now EOT broadcast stations an the air at 
Houston, Pallas and Eichards<m, and another is on the way in the Austin - 
San Antonio area. Support is here but this state needs many laore stations. 









- 10 - 


Utah - Ibis state has 2 ETV stations m the air at Salt lake City 
and at Ogden. Another one Is planned at Ogden. Another one la planned at 
Ogden, and am at hogaa. The University at Provo has also put in its bid 
for a station. Tim State legislature supports the operation of the IMiversity 
station. 


VermontZ - nils state has had a special Ceswisslaa on ETV since 
195 ^ and it is still trying to find says and means to activate a station. 

Virginia - She legislature passed a bill authorizing state 
support for ETV in 1959> last the act was vetoed. local groups are still 
working to establish stations. ETV is being used in Norfolk and surrounding 
school districts and in Pdcisaond. These coianunities are ready for their own 
stations. 


Washington - Bas had state support and encouragement in the 
development of ETV since 195^* The first ETV channel was activated at the 
University of Washington in Seattle in 195^, and sir years later the second 
station went on the air in O&ccxaa. Since then Tacoma School District #10 has 
received a construction permit to establish a third station. Extensive 
planning and experimentation has continued at Pullman and Spokane in the 
Eastern part of the state. But much remains to be done. 

Wisconsin - Shis state, through its long-establJj&ed Radio Council, 
has a comprehensive state plan, but has been unable to appropriate funds for 
activation. The ETV station at the Uhivfcesity of Wisconsin went on the air in 
1994, and the legislature has regularly approporiated operational funds for it. 
Milwaukee put l&se«nsin f s second station on the air with public school funds 
in 1957> and now the program schedule is so heavy they are asking for a 
second channel. 











- 11 - 


Surely this brief survey of the interest and activities in the 
several states indicates a readiness for the proposed legislation. On the 
other hand, there is ample evidence that any prolonged delay in ETV legisla¬ 
tion would have serious adverse consequences. 

Most of the states and many of ;tbe localities throughout the 
country have done a great deal of preliminary planning for ET¥ looking 
toward the time when Federal assistance would be made available. In many 
areas local effort has been kept alive fear the past two years by the promise 
of the Magnuson MU. Much preliminary legislative support in the states, and 
premises of ETV operating support, have been based upon the hopes of Eongress- 
ional support. If federal assistance fhils again at this time, or were to 
be postponed through another Congress, saieh of the work and planning at the 
past two years would be lost, i educational and coraounity interests work¬ 
ing for OTT would lose much of their legislative support to other programs. 
IMs would be especially difficult to overcome in the states which have 
biennial legislatures. She time, energy and local money lost to the develop¬ 
ment of OTF would be incalciifchle if there were to be any great delay in 
Federal assistance. 


Haere are 28 states where substantial investments have already been 
made in EEV. Stsese include 7 western states, 8 aid-western states, 4 eastern 
states, and 9 southern states. But in all of ;these states further develop¬ 
ment is now largely dependent on Federal assistance and in many instances a 
prolonged delay would seriously retard program development and cooperative 
school utilization. 

Wm&re are 21 localities which have applied for ETV station Construction 
Permits or which have asked for specific channels to be reserved preliminary to 







applying, and in most instances the action ms 'based upon the hopes of the 
proposed BUI®* Postponement at this point would seriously Jeopardize 
these developments. 'There are 35 states which have either state or local 
planning for new EN development which is ccastingent upon Federal assistance* 
In many of ; these, planning has advanced to a critical stage, and prolonged 
delay would he disastrous, and ia any event would retard beginning develop¬ 
ment thgou&h another biennium. A listing of some cf these states will 
better illustrate the situation: 

KANSAS - this state has a state plan to provide much-needed ETV 
facilities to 85 # of its population. She legislature can see its my clear 
to provide only l/6 of the development money needed in the hope that Federal 
Assistance will add enough to make an encouraging start. Belay now win 
jeopardize two years* work, and may cause the loss of several of the proposed 
channels to coasaercial interests. One such channel is already slipping 
away from the State schools. 

NEBRASKA - this state has a plan similar to the Kfcasas plan, but it 
is entirely dependent upon taking immediate advantage of specific unassigned 
VHF channels. Hie State*# claim is now being contested, and lack of funds 
or delay in development will undoubtedly cause the loss of these channels. 
Here, as la Kansas, the loss of one or two channels would wreck the uhotle 
State Ban. 


NEW MEXICO - this state has built one TSUV station and has plans 
developed to furnish service to all the schools in the state, but it cannot 
build the other 2 stations without assistance, and again delay endangers the 
necessary channels. 












• 13 - 


MAINE - this state has a plan, hut has been unable to build 
stations to meet its needs. It is having difficulties defending its pro¬ 
posed use of good channels. Delay at this time weakens mine’s chances 
of effective ETV development. 

MQfTOHA - this state, with a Foundation Grant, has developed a 
very economical and effective state plan* Its development depends on out¬ 
side assistance, and the key channel could be lost by delay. 

35MESSES - has 2 channel 2's which are being eyed by comaercial 
interests - these are part of a state plan which mis t have Federal assistance 
to get off the ground. 

FUmm, GEORGIA,, ALABAMA - all have advanced State Plan and 
large developments, but each need assistance to preserve their gains and 
meet their increasing needs. 

MISSISSIPPI, ARKANSAS, WOT1ING & IDAHO - all are Just beginning to 
get organized far EIV. Iheir only hope is outside assistance, and inordinate 
delay in getting it will set them back considerably. 

mm YORK, MICHIGAH, WISCONSIN & TEXAS - have all made good starts, 
but are now, for diverse reasons, at a critical point where no effective 
progress can be made without some help. Uhese are comparatively rich states 
but at this point seed money is essential and delay in all of these areas 
puts serious pressure on the reserved channels. 

Nineteen states now have more or less elaborate State Plans for EW, 

or are in the planning stage. In every instance 

;V 

hinges upon immediate Federal assistance. 


phase of the pi 











■14- 


There are several states, such as tibst Virginia and Idaho, where 
interest has been Icindled only because of the hope of the proposed Bills. 

These States cannot possibly have any developiaent through local resources 
unless and until outside assistance is available. Postponetasnt new would 
probably destroy the possibility for years. 

The sum of this recital is that all over the eouutxy work and 
plans for ETV development have been sparked by the hope and promise of 
Federal legislation. A large proportion of the plans have been guided by 
this promise. The time is crucial, as the description of the situation in 
the several states and many localities indicates. Another postponement, 
or serious delay, at this time would seriously handicap this development 
for years - in some cases, many years. In addition to this, there! is 
always the threat of losing the reserved channels, or of being too late to 
drop-in a necessary channel. 

She need stands aloe and separate from other needs. This legisla¬ 
tion will not affect any other legislation. The need is now, and a dollar 
now would be worth several in the future. There is a time for all progressive 
developments to move. STV has reached that critical moment - it moves now, or 
endangers its total progress. 




March IT, imi 


Mr* W* E* Williamson 
Clark 

Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
itoom 1334 

Meuse Office Building 
Washington 25, D. C* 

Bear Mr* Williamson: 

Mere are names of witnesses who plan to testify during the 
hearings on assistance for educational television, 

Tuesday, March 21 

Mr. Raymond Hurlbart, General Manager, Alabama 
MTV OwniSSlon 

Mm* Marine Seoville, President, Kansas State P. T* A. 
Congress 



Mr. T. S. Tyler, Chairman, Arkansas State Committee 
to Study Educational Possibilities of Television 


Or 


Fuller, representing the Joint Council 


Or* Logan Wilson, President, University of Tessas, 
Austin, Terns 

Or. Hilton C. %l#y. Southern Connecticut State 
College, Mew Haven, Connecticut, representing 
American Council on Education* 


Or* Robert Anderson, Executive Fie# President, 

Auburn University, former Director, Southern Kegion 
Education Board 

Dr. Amend Hunter, Director of broadcasting, Michigan 
State University 





te, W. S> WittiSMKNi 


Harch It. 1961 


Sr, John C. Cmbbe, General Manager. KITS, 

SacraiMNsto. California, member California Governor f « 
Advisory OoMBittM on Educational Television 

Thursday, March 23 

Dr, Clifford Eriksea, Dean of In® tract ion, Chicago 
City Junior Collage 

Dr„ Lloyd Elliot, President, Uni varsity of tela®, 
representing American Association of land Grant 
College® and State Universities, and the State 
Universities Association 

tern, Elisabeth Campbell, President, Greater Washington 
Educational Television Association, with Dr, William 
Schmidt, Superintendent, Prime® Georges County Public 
School® 

tea*, tertlrn Gable, Director, Division of Radio-TV 
Education, Philadelphia Public Schools, representing 
the American Association of University W o man , 

Several other witness®® plan to participate and their names 
will be passed along as soon as their appearances are confined. 


William G. Harley 







JOHN B. BENNETT 



COMMITTEES: 

Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
House Administration 


Congress of tfje Untteb States 


SECRETARY: 

MARGARET J. ROBINSON 


Jlotise of &epre$entattoes 

~l iiaafrmaton, 10. C. 


March 21, 1961 


\ 


Mr. William G. Harley, President 
National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters 
13^6 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Harley: 

Thank you for your letter of March IT advising me that 
Dr. Arraand Hunter will testify before the Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce Subcommittee on Communications 
and Power legislation on educational television. This 
is of particular interest to me and I will be interested 
in his comments. I hope I will be able to attend the 
meeting of the Subcommittee but in any event I would 
appreciate receiving a copy of his statement. Thank 
you for writing me. 


Sincerely, 



hdj 



87th CONGRESS 
1st Session 


S. 205 


IN THE HOUSE OE REPRESENTATIVES 

March 22,1961 

Referred to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce 


AN ACT 

To expedite the utilization of television transmission facilities 
in our public schools and colleges, and in adult training 
programs. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bepresenta- 

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 

3 That there is hereby authorized to be appropriated such 

4 amounts as may he necessary to assist the States and certain 

5 organizations therein to establish or improve television broad- 

6 casting for educational purposes, in accordance with the pro- 

7 visions of this Act, by providing for the establishment and 

8 improvement of television broadcasting facilities. 

9 Sec. 2. Any agency or officer, or organization in a 
10 State, described in clause (b) (2) of this section, which is 

I 




2 


1 establishing or improving television broadcasting facilities, 

2 may receive a grant as authorized in this Act to cover the 

3 cost of such establishment or improvement by— 

(a) making application therefor in such form as is 
prescribed by the United States Commissioner of Edu¬ 
cation; and 

(b) providing assurance satisfactory to the Com¬ 
missioner of Education— 

(1) that the necessary funds to operate and 
maintain such facilities will be available; 

(2) that the operation of such facilities will be 
under the control of (a) the agency or officer 
primarily responsible for the State supervision of 
public elementary and secondary schools, (b) a 
duly constituted State educational television com¬ 
mission, or (c) a State controlled college or uni¬ 
versity, except that any such agency, officer, com¬ 
mission, college or university may for the purposes 
of this Act distribute funds received under this Act 
to nonprofit foundations, corporations, or associations 
in the same State which are organized primarily to 
engage in or encourage educational television broad¬ 
casting if the operation of the facilities which such 
funds are used to establish or improve will be under 
the control of such nonprofit organization; and 


4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 


3 


1 (3) that such facilities will be used only for 

2 educational purposes. 

3 Sec. 3. Upon determining that an agency or officer of 

4 an organization has satisfied the requirements of section 2 

5 of this Act, the Commissioner of Education is authorized to 

6 make a grant to such agency, officer, or organization in such 

7 amount as is determined by the Commissioner to be reason- 

8 able and necessary to coyer the cost of such establishment 

9 or improvement of facilities. An agency or officer or an 

10 organization may receive one or more grants under the 

11 provisions of this Act, but the total amount of such grants 

12 for television broadcasting facilities in any State shall not 

13 exceed $1,000,000. Such grants shall be made out of 
11 funds appropriated for the purposes of this Act, and may be 

15 made in such installments as the Commissioner deems 

1 6 appropriate. 

17 Sec. 4. As used in this Act the term “establishing or 
1® improving television broadcasting facilities” means the ac- 

19 quisition and installation of transmission apparatus necessary 

20 for television (including closed-circuit television) broadcast- 

2 1 ing, and does not include the construction or repair of 

22 structures to house such apparatus, and the term “State” 

23 means the several States and the District of Columbia. 

2 ! Sec. 5. The Federal Communications Commission is 
25 authorized to provide such assistance in carrying out the pro- 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 


4 


visions of this Act as may be requested by the Commissioner 
of Education. 

Sec. 6. Nothing in this Act shall be deemed (a) to give 
the Commissioner of Education any control over television 
broadcasting, or (b) to amend any provision of, or require¬ 
ment under, the Federal Communications Act. 

Sec. 7. No application for any grant under this Act may 
be accepted by the Commissioner of Education after the day 
which is five years after the date of enactment of this Act. 

Sec. 8. (a) Each recipient of assistance under section B 
of this Act shall keep such records as the Commissioner shall 
prescribe, including records which fully disclose the amount 
and the disposition by such recipient of the proceeds of such 
assistance, the total cost of the project or undertaking in con¬ 
nection with which such assistance is given or used, and the 
amount and nature of that portion of the cost of the project 
or undertaking supplied by other sources, and such other 
records as will facilitate an effective audit. 

(b) The Commissioner and the Comptroller General 
of the United States, or any of their duly authorized repre¬ 
sentatives, shall have access for the purpose of audit and 


5 


1 examination to any books, documents, papers, and records of 

2 the recipient that are pertinent to assistance received under 

3 section 3 of this Act. 

Passed the Senate March 21, 1961. 

Attest: FELTON M. JOHNSTON, 

Secretary . 







IE a 

W ITJ 

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g g* c* 

Ear 
5 ' l : E 

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= 6 - 


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cn 




SAMUEL N. FRIEDEL 
7th District, Maryland 


COMMITTEES: 


1610 New House Office Bldg. 

TELEPHONE: 

CAPITOL 4-3121, extension 4741 



lioujSe of Eepresentattoes 

Washington, 39. C. 


HOUSE ADMINISTRATION 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN 
COMMERCE 

323 Post Office Bldg. 
Baltimore, Maryland 

TELEPHONE: 

MUlberry 5-8320, extension 451 


Manch 22, 1<j6l 


/Ha. William Q. HaAleg, pAeAident 

National Aaao elation o£ Educational BAoadcaAieAA 

I^Lf-6 ConnccJLicut Avenue, N.W. 

WaAhington 6, D. C- 

Dean /Ha. Hanley: 

Thank you ^oa gouA Aecent letteA adviAing me that 
Da. William Schmidt o^ pAince QeoAgeA County will he 
teAti^ging bejgoAe ike Subcommittee on C ommu -nicationA and 
PoweA cLuiing the heaAingA on legiAlation to pAovide 3ed- 
eAal AuppoAt £oa educational televiAion. 

9- am not a membeA O’p ihiA Subcommittee, howeveA, 

9 will tng to Atop bg the C omm lttee to hean Da. Schmidt f A 
teAtimong i<p mg dutieA will peAmit. OtheAwiAe, 9 will 
Aead Tula Atatement when ihiA meaAUAe Xa conAideAed bg the 
^llII 9nteAAiaie and 3oAeign QommeAce C orrm dttee. 

WanmeAt AegaAdU . 


SinceAeJjg, 

~^amue3 N. 3niedel, TH.Q. 











□ 


Class of Service 

This is a fast message 
unless its deferred char¬ 
acter is indicated by the 
proper symbol. 


TELEGRAM 

W. P. MARSHALL, president 


1 " 0 ^ 'S^^OpC^-GO)^ 


DL = Day Letter 
NL=Night Letter 


i .i t _International 

l ^ LT g.;;;;^jegram / . 


The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt i; LOCAL TIME at point of destination 

RBA213 WA415 

<RB) (K LWA053) PD LAWRENCE KANS 23 359P CST 
BETTY MCILVANE, NATL ASSN 07 EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 
DUPONT CIRCLE OFFICE BLDG 1346 CONNECTICUT SUITE 1119 NORTHWEST 
WASHDC 

MRS MAXINE SCOVILLE MAILING ADDRESS 3009 NORTH 20TH STREET 
KANSAS CITY 4 KANSAS 














Class of Service 

This is a fast message 
unless its deferred char¬ 
acter is indicated by the 
proper symbol. 


TELEGRAM 

W. P. MARSHALL, president 


SF-1201 (4-00) 


1961 iw\A 29 


NL=Night Letter 

International 
w Letter Telegram^ 


The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point ortestination 

RBA059 CTB037 CT 

WJA017 PD MORGANTOWN WVIR 29 1031A EST 
HAROLD E HILL, ADMINISTRATIVE VICE PRES 

NATl. ASSN OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 1346 CONN AVE WASHDC 
HAVE CONTACTED GOVERNORS OFFICE AS YOU ADVISED 
HAROLD J SHAMBERGER. 
















STATEMENT FOR THE HOUSE INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMITTEE 
MARCH 23, 1961 


CLIFFORD G. ERICKSON 
Dean of Television Instruction 
CHICAGO CITY JUNIOR COLLEGE 

This is a statement in support of Federal grants to the several states 
to aid them in initiating and expanding educational service through non-profit 
broadcast television channels. 

Since 19£6 the Chicago Board of Education, through the Chicago City 
Junior College, has been utilizing broadcast television to bring a unique 
educational service to the six million residents of Chicagoland. In a real 
sense, the walls of the institution had been expanded to a circle with a 
radius of over 50 miles. This circle bounds the signal area of WTTW, 

Channel 11, Chicago’s non-profit community owned educational channel. 

In the Spring of 1961, 2^17 adult students are registered for credit in 
nine standard college courses. A TV College Information Folder describing 
these nine courses is supplied to the Committee as Exhibit A. When the 2^17 
part-time enrollments are combined, they become equal to 7U2 full-time 
enrollments. This television college requires no campus except the occasional 
use of classrooms in the Chicago City Junior College. If this group were to 
be taught conventionally, a campus costing several millions of dollars would 
be required. 

Over h0% of Chicago's adult television students are interested in teach¬ 
ing as a new career. Among these are many homemakers who attend college only 
because instruction is brought into their living rooms by television. They 
hope to become practicing teachers after their children are grown and able to 
care for themselves. These mature students will help meet the desperate short¬ 
age of qualified teachers in the coming years. 


- 2 - 


By cooperation with the Chicago Teachers College, two of the current 
courses are open to practicing and prospective teachers. One of these, a 
course in Human Relations, is being taught at the graduate level with the 
express purpose of helping classroom teachers understand and cope with class¬ 
room problems* 

New opportunities are also afforded, to home-bound, hospitalized and 
imprisoned students. These students number between 50 and 100 each term. 

This instruction is provided at a much lower cost than tutorial instruction 
and with greater effectiveness than correspondence instruction. 

The quality of this higher educational experience via television can be 
certified as equal to or better than conventional instruction, Chicago^ 

TV College was.? begun in 1956 under a grant of #500,000 from the Fund for the 
Advancement of Education. In the three years, 1956 to 1959, intensive 
research was carried on in a large number of carefully controlled experiments. 
The achievement of television students has consistently been equal to or 
superior to conventionally taught students. These data are summarized on 
pages 7 through 9 in the printed report entitled Chicago 1 s TV College supplied 
to the Committee as exhibit B. 

The TV College project has been carefully studied to determine unit costs 
of instruction. The Chicago Board of Education makes payment to WTTW for the 
actual costs of broadcasting. Currently these charges are $18,000 per month. 
The unit cost of credit instruction via television is calculated by dividing 
the total of broadcasting charges and all other instructional costs by the 
number of equivalent full-time students served. In Spring 1961, this unit 
cost is estimated to be less than classroom instructional cost by #U0 per full¬ 
time student per year. In other words, quality college television instruction 
cost, after five years of experience, has dropped to a level below classroom 
costs and thus additional students can be added at about one-third the cost of 


classroom instruction. 



- 3 - 


Equally important is the amount of additional educational service given 
free as a unique bonus of the broadcast television medium. At no additional 
cost, £000 not-for-credit enrollees are following one or more of the courses 
with some regularity. Audience surveys and estimates suggest a total 
unduplicated audience of 25>0,000 who watch at least one of the nine TV College 
courses on a reasonably regular basis. 

Worthy of attention by this Committee is the evaluation of the TV College 
project by a panel of distinguished educators representing four fields— 
accreditation of institutions of higher education, communications# research, 
evaluation and testing, and administration of public higher education. The 
panel included the following: 

Norman Burns, Secretary, Commission on Colleges and Universities, 

North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
Henry Chauncey, President, Educational Testing Service 
Frederick L. Hovde, President, Purdue University 
Wilbur Schramm, Director, Institute for Communication Research, 

Stanford University 

A few extracts of the panel T s evaluation dated June I960 are as follows: 

Courses at the junior college level can be taught effectively 
to a home audience by television. The results on this point were 
most impressive and convincing. Indeed, in the few cases where 
there were significant differences between the performance of home 
TV students and classroom face-to-face students, the differences 
were more often in favor of the TV students than the others. 

When junior college work is offered on television, it brings 
into the educational system a new group of students—an older 
group (median age in the 30’s), most of them housewives, who are 
strongly motivated to continue their education but have been kept 
from doing so by home and family duties. These students like and 
are grateful for television courses. Once started on higher 
education by television, they are likely to go on to a junior or 
senior college degree. Many of them are planning to become 
teachers. Obviously this is an important group to bring back into 
education. 


- k - 


The television courses are reaching a group of students 
most of whom would otherwise not take junior college work. It 
is serving a group of handicapped and otherwise restricted 
students. It is reaching a group of non-credit students, which 
averages several times the size of the group studying for credit. 
It is also reaching a group of oasual viewers who are registered 
neither for credit nor without credit—an "eavesdropping" 
audience about which we know very little but which is estimated 
to range from five to twenty-five thousand persons per program. 

In other words, it seems to us that offering junior college 
courses on television is a service to the City of Chicago far 
wider than the service to credit students. 

Evidence of the high motivation of the TV students and the 
welcome given the TV courses is the fact that about 6£ per cent 
of the television students finish their courses and take the 
final examinations. This completion rate is quite remarkable when 
compared with other forms of adult education for credit* 


Federal grants to the States to aid them in establishing educational 
television broadcasting stations and networks can encourage low-cost 
extension of educational opportunities for adults as has been provided by 
Chicago’s TV College since 19E>6. It is doubtful that any other investment in 
broadcasting and education can pay such high dividends for individual 
citizens and for the State. 


28 March 1961 


Mr* Robert Schenkkan 
Director, Radio-Television 
University of Texas 
Austin, Texas 

Dear Bob: 

As you know, the Subcommittee on Communications and Power of the 
House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee has been conducting 
hearings in connection with the consideration of legislation to provide 
Federal aid to educational television. 

Public testimony has been concluded and it is expected that the committee 
will be considering this legislation in the near future. Mr. Joe M. Kilgore, 
of McAllen, Texas, is a member of the House Interstate and Foreign 
Commerce Committee. While we don't have any NAEB members in that area, 
I thought you might have a friend there who, if he has not already done so, 
might like to convey his views regarding this legislation to Congressman 
Kilgore. Or, failing that, perhaps you, yourself, would like to do so. 

Cordially, 


Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 


HEHijph 


National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 

1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 

March 28, 1961 


Mr. Richard S. Burdick 
Station WHYY 
1622 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

As a basis for consideration of legislation to provide federal 
assistance to educational television, Chairman Oren Harris of the 
House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee is contacting today the 
governor of Mb±xxxxsx each state to determine what plans the state 
has for activating educational television if federal support is 
forthcoming. Realizing it is impossible for the governor to be 
tkXHBxkksa thoroughly conversant with ETV planning, and in view of 
the importance of a positive response, it is imperative that you 
contact the governor of Delaware and advise him of the plans for 
his state. Please advise us at earliest opportunity of your 
contact and results. 


Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 
National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters 




NATIONAL ASSOCIATIO N^O F EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 


OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 



DuPont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 



Mr. Raymond D. Hurlbert, 


General Manager 
Alabama ETV Commission 
807 Protective Life Building 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Dear Raymond: 

As you know, the Subcommittee on Communications and Power of the 
House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee has been conducting 
hearings in connection with the consideration of legislation to provide 
Federal aid to educational television. 

Public testimony has been concluded and it is expected that the committee 
will be considering this legislation in the near future . Mr. Kenneth A. 
Roberts, of Anniston, Alabama, is a member of the House Interstate and 
Foreign Commerce Committee . While we don’t have any NAEB members 
in that area, I thought you might have a friend there who, if he has not 
already done so, might like to convey his views regarding this legislation 
to Congressman Roberts. Or, failing that, perhaps you, yourself, would 
like to do so. 


Sincerely, 



Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 


HEH:jph 



s 'A 


i n 









STATE OF NEVADA 


BYRON F. STETLER 
Superintendent of 
Public Instruction 


Carson City 

March 29, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill, Administrative Vice President 
National Association of Education Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hill: 


In reply to your telegram of today's date regarding what plans the 


State of Nevada has for activating educational television if Federal support 
is forthcoming, I must advise you that no detailed plans have been formulated. 


Further comment might be made to the effect that under the present 


status of development of television in the State of Nevada, it is question¬ 
able whether many of the schools could take advantage of it. 


Sincerely yours. 



Byron F. Stetler, 
Superintendent of 
Public Instruction 


BFS: ms 

cc: The Honorable Grant Sawyer 

Governor of the State of Nevada 




National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 

1346 Connecticut Avenue 

March 29, 1961 


Mr. George W. Starcher 
President 

University of North Dakota 
Grandfork, North Dakota 

As a basis for consideration of legislation to provide federal 
assistance to educational television Chairman Oren Harris of the 
House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee is contacting 
today the governor of each state to determine what plans the 
state has for activating educational television if federal support 
is forthcoming. Realizing it is impossible for the governor to be 
thoroughly conversant with ETV planning, and in view of the 
importance of a positive response, it is imperative that you 
contact the governor immediately and advise him of the plans for 
your state. Please advise us at earliest opportunity of your 
contact and results. 


Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 
National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 





Class of Service 

This is a fast message 
unless its deferred char¬ 
acter is indicated by the 
proper symbol. 


WESTERN UNION 


TELEGRAM 

W. P. MARSHALL. pr«siden+ 


The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME i 


SF-1201 (4-60) 

0 AM in o | 

point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at poll 


DL = Day Letter 
NL=Night Letter 


..International 
Letter Telegram^ 


'nt of destination 


RBA035 WA1S3 

<RB) (0 SEAS94). NL PD FAIRBANKS ALASKA MAR 29 
HAROLD E HILL, ADMINISTRATIVE VICE PRES 

NATIONAL ASSN OF EDUCATION BROADCASTERS 134S CONNECTICUT 
AVE NORTHWEST WASHDC 

IN RESPONSE TO YOUR WIRE HAVE DISCUSSED WITH GOVERNOR EGAN 
FWHO HAS NOT YET RECEIVED COMMUNICATION FROM CHAIRMAN ORAN 
HARRIS GOVERNOR EXPRESSED INTEREST AND STATED HE WOULD CONFER 
WITH STATE EDUCATIONAL COMMISSIONER THEO NORBY 
WILLIAM R WOOD PRESIDENT. 















WESTERN UNION WESTERN UNION WESTEI 
TELEGRAM TELEGRAM TEL 



RBB057 AA255 KB 24 3 
K LNA 320 PD LINCOLN NEBR 29 343P CsT 
HAROLD E HILL, DUPONT CIRCLE OFFICE BLDG 


1961 MM m 5 Zt 

■ ■ i-. i ON </.' ■ 


1346 CONN AVE NW WAsHDC NATIONAL ASSOC OF EDUCATIOWLBROADCASTERS 

930 MONDAY APPOINTMENT WITH GOVERNOR BEST COULD DO WILL REPORT 
LATER 

JACK MCBRIDE DIRECTOR OF TELEVISION KUON-TV 


930. 






Class of Service 

This is a fast message 
unless its deferred char¬ 
acter is indicated by the 
proper symbol. 


WESTERN UNION 

TELEGRAM 


SF-1201 (4-GO) 

A 


-v 


DL = Day Letter 
NL=Night Letter 


_ International 
“"Letter Telegram^ 


The filing time shown in the date line 


W. P. MARSHALL. President 

n domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of destination 


LLE054 CTA112 4 

PRA019 PR LLH01? NL PD 
TDPR MISSOULA MONT 50 
HAROLD E HILL 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BRAODCASTERS 1546 CONNECTICUT 
AVE NORTHWEST WASHDC 

STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION HARRIOT MILLER AND 
I MET WITH GOVERNOR NUTTER THIS AFTERNOON. MEETING WAS BRIEF, 
FRIENDLY. GOVENOR SEEMED ENTERESTED BUT NONCOMMITAL. WAS ADVISED 
PRIOR TO MEETING NOT TO USE HARD SELL. BELIVE GOVERNOR WILL 
CONTACT MISS MILLER OR ME FOR FUTURE INFORMATION WHEN HARR 
S CONTACTS HIM. GOVERNOR SAID HE HAD NOT BEEN CONTACTED YET. 

ERLING S. JORGENSEN DIRECTOR MONTANA E*T.V. PROJECT ONTANA 
STATE UNIVERSITY. 














THIS LETTER TO JAMES C. HEALEY ALSO 
MOHAWKHUDOON COUNCIL ON EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION 

RlVKMIOC SCHOOL - PROMT STRMT. SCMINRCTAOY «. NCW YORK 
PRANKUN 4-SSS1 


March 50, mi 


Honorable Lm V. O'Brien 

Committee on Interstate cad Foreign Commerce 
loom 1354, House Office Building 
Washington. B. C. 

Beer Congressmen 0*Brian: 

I hops that tha evidence you have scan adds up to tha aaad for passage 
of tha educational televiaion aid legislation (Msgnaaoo-Sehoeppel 


Our experience lm Hair York State has been that this aid la needed desper¬ 
ately If educational television la going to be able la the foreseeable 
future to begin to make the kind of gains for education la Men York State 
that it has in tha easy other states throughout the country that bane 
brought the ouaber of educational tdl'ovlalon stations on tha air te 
fifty-five in Just eight years. 

r-A ** 

Am President of the New York State Kducetlocal ledlo and Television . 
association and Manager of the Mohavk-Hudson Council on Educational 

To 1 avia ion I have had an Opportunity to a as tha statewide picture as 
veil es know intimately the problems thst have caused educational tele- 
v here in the Cepital Bistrlet. 

There is no question but what teachers, principals, superintendents end 
parents went educetlocal television. The qneetlos le how do you get 
over the first hurdle, that of buying the necessary equipment end hiring 
the necessary personnel la order to gat on the air. It has takas us 
sight years to try to gat over this hurdle in the Oepital District end 
although we have much of oar equipment, unless we can obtain additional 
funds vs will net be able te be an the sir by September 1 to serve dose 
ffe 100, #00 stud ent, s In the pub lic end rsTOchJSl' schoo l^ of »»hi« ar»s T . 

Throughout the State the situation la pretty much tha same as far as 
moving ahead with educational television is concerned. The establishment 
of n station appears to bo so formidable that eddettera end administrators 
tone to sit beck end welt far something to happen. 

Ms would have no interstate highways without Peddml help. Certainly the 
drive toward excellence In education le no lest important.‘ Interstate 
highways cost fl million's nils. An educational television station 
serving in-•choc1 and adult populations throughout s thirty to fifty 
mil# radios car be set* up end oporetbd for e wholo year for half of what 
it coats for e eingle alls of highway. 







Honorable Loo W. 0 # Brien 


HI* * 


Hereh 30, iWl 


It oooao to « that thorn If no guoatloa horo of to tfc* need, Tho 
qoootlon if how long ore wo going to delay taking advantage of thla 
excellent oedlun for the went important Job wo have before ow¬ 
ed neat lem < 


Sincerely yowre 









I 


MOHAWK-HUDSON COUNCIL ON EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION 


nUNKUN 4>INI 


Hatch 50, LMl 


Mia Kxcallency Malaon I* locktfiUtr 
The Govern#r of Sow Toth 
Albany, Sev York 

Boar Governor Kockafeller: 


X have Juat received a phono call from the D a tl e e a l AaaoeUtlon 
of Educational Broadcasters In Heehlagton to the of foot that fallowing 
tha hoarlaga of tha House Xatoratato aad Fareign Caanarca Cowalttee on 

tao —pw «ui, ahoAmoN Aussie haa ’4ho Szzzzzzzs. zl 

fifty a tat aa to attayt to Aiaaovar tha extent of ooa4 fat aid to develep 
educational talaviaionathtlooa. 

Aa Freeident of tha Mow fork ttata Educational Indio and Talaviaion 
Association, I rhonght X aught to tty to give yon a brlof pie tern of 
tho annd fat Federal half if -wa aro to nova ahead la tha vitally la- 
port ant araa of ednaational talaviaion. 

With fifty-five ana Mum ratal, educational talaviaion atatloaa on tho 
air aarooa tho eoontry it la ha*d to hoi lava that Dev Toth ttata cannot 
hoaat of a atagla non-caaaarelal, educational talaviaion atation aa a 
reserved cha nnal : It ia troa that thorn ia a OUF a tat ton in Buffalo, 
hat aa yon nay kaov, thia station ana owned by HBC, oaf aiaoa tho atatloa 
oonld not ceupete with tho othor V*F atatloaa, HBC took it off tho air 
anil offered it aa a gift, to tha Hhatarn loo York ki n aattonal Television 
Association. 

Of tho ton UHF channel a reserved for a in s at tonal talaviaion in Haw York 
ttata not ~a single one has been activated. VOC Csaartijoionar Lea con 
to Albasy during tha recent Laglalatlve aoaaion and copyist nod pnhllcly 
ahont this fact. Coil aa toner Lea ia* nor king toward tha non of all HI 
ohonnala for television. As no neve closer to an all HIV pic tom them 
wche . on i ny a a «A . a»w orntm ieny«o« «— uid»i Sift- ««■■■! n «u4 
ovary likelihood that raaorvod e ducat ional taiovialen chaanala will Aava 
to ha given ep aa they have ia tha pant. . 

Tha Hehank-Bedsee Council on ■dusstloaal Telovia ten hare in the QBpltsl 
Die trier hoe busy grant od e Bogente Charter permitting It to oyerato on 
Ch a nn e l 17, one ef the ten channels. Although noth a gefp oa nt has baton 
j aegeired ajifher throngh purchase or doantloo, tha CawaaAl Mill goods ■ 
eons tier eh la outside help la putting the station an tha air. 

thare am aonaails la Hatortowa and laehaator Hot am in various stages 
of ploaniag for an edncatienal talsvislee station to soma their sms. 
Interact la jgaay other areas of tho ttata la furthering e dna a t ional tala- 
vlaian has haga oh ona by tha naoherahip of enr atatovUo association. 

•tilth none outside help action wou ld he tnkon very gulckly, X an carte la, 
in putting educational television stations on tha air. 


• Bis Excellency Nalson I. lockefallar 


i 


Hli * March 30, mi 




kUtbi Capital District have been doing instructional progrsuing 
far tha past eight j««r« <m the ro— ratal television ataeloaa bar a. 

Oar lo-school ptogxau la Halt ad to oaa half-boar a day siapiy ba- 
caaaa tha caaaareial atat 1 oaa have aat baaa able to grant aora time. 

With only oaa-haIf boar a day available, aebool superintendents ara 
bard pat to apaad nonay for television reeeivere. I baaa aora than 
fifty Lottara fraa aroa aebool adalnlatratara indicating that they wmmt 
aoco odaeatloaal television prog r am s far choir oafroolp oai -thaE 
would oaa tbaaa prograaa if they mere available. than a people are all 
aaaioua to aoo a station go on the air boro. 

I aa convinced that if you wore to poll teachers, principals and 
superintendents throughout the State where educational•television 
programing baa beam offered and ask then if they aoo this aa a valu¬ 
able addition to their aebool program, they would agree that it la. 

I suspect that even in areas where there la no educational television 
service you would gat the sans reply* 

BUt an educational talavis loo station requires equipment and personnel 
and am operating budget that baa never figured into aebool finances in 
tha peat. Ha know that wa can help improve education and help to otaa 
the rising coots of education through the use of television* To do 
thin we uust hove the tool—on educational television station. 

This la tha third yoir that tha Magwisoa.illl has possad tha taMa. • 

«h taw* about tha aa^ bills that mm •«» got a haarlag U tha Boaaa 
U prorlooa yoora. This yo*r adoeatlooal talorlaloo la gattlag a haar- 
lB. la tha haoaa. gp a a fc la g tor both tha ttbaok Sadsao Cnoaall oa Wa- 
ratlaawl TalsalaLoo and tha ha* York State Bdueatloaal Badlo aad Tala¬ 
ris laa Aaaoclatloo, oay I r ao paot tally r.oa—sad that yoa ragooat 


glaooraly yoara 




THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION 


PARKWAY AT TWENTY-FIRST STREET 


ZONB 3 


ALLEN H. WETTER 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 


MARTHA A. GABLE 

DIRECTOR OF RADIO AND TELEVISION EDUCATION 


March 30, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
DuPont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 

Washington (6), D.C, 

Dear Harold: 

I have written to our AAUW Pennsylvania 
State Chairman and asked her to round up the 
members who are constituents of Mr. Curtin 
of Morrisville. I shall write to him also. 

All the best to you. 


Sincerely yours. 



MARTHA A. GABLE 
Director 


H 



KETC- CHAN L 9 

G996 MILLEROOK 

irr. Louis 3o, ... 


.‘torch 30, 1961 


toltoRf Tcjvernor 
Jefferson City, Ueeourl 
!toar Octet 

X in Infante that Open ffcrrls, Chaiimrt of the Boise Interstate te 

Foreign Cowseros Connlttee, has contacted you to find out what piano 
Missouri has for activating educational television If federal financial 
r ep or t lo f orlheonlag* 

k*yrmwy knot*, a bill haa been passed by the Senate which would pro* 
vide up to 13*000,000 for each state for the capital needs (ether than 
buildings) of educational television, both open-oiroult and olosed-elrauli* 
Hearings were hold last week by the Oubooteitee on C n — nnl oftione, of 
which Morgan Moulder la the Chaimsn, on alniler legislation that haa 
been introduced in the House of Reproseuta&ivee* 

Missouri haa four ohannela reserved for non-coBBercial educational tala* 
vlaloni XtPO - Ghatmel 9 In St# Ionia tech want on the air In 5 apt te nr 
19#*, Channel 19 In Kansas City which X understand started broadcasting 
this week, Channel 36 in St* Joseph and Channel 26 In Springfield* 8a 
far aa X know, there are no ata t e te.de plane* Ho we v er, all of us who 
have any Interest in and knowledge of educetional television and Its ted s , 
would agree that federal fends are alnost a necessity if steatlonsl tele¬ 
vision is to develop fully Its poss ibilit ies for service to the state* 

Km, for etwwpls, should be able to Increase its power from 60,000 watts 
te the ******* of 316,000 authorised by the FCC* Vs also have urgent ate 
fur te put a s*Mte sates tee operation, a seete 

videotape recorder, and nasy other lapcrtant pleoes of aqulpewnt# 3iat- 
larly, the Ontersity of Klaeourl needs additional facilities whlofc fsderal 
funds would tea possible for the more effective operation of its olooed* 
circuit lastallstlon* The indie- tions are that fsdnrel funds are about 
the only source we sac turn to if these vary substa nti a l needs are to be 
net* 

iterd Utesrt of the University of Missouri, when yon tew. ap p ea re d be¬ 
fore the Coatettee lest week speaking in favor of the legislation* tel* 

X did not testily si the hearings? W «n point of view is Peru sed te 
the enclosed copy of a letter to Mbrsm Moulder# 

X hope that you will feel it possible for you ts give a definite te posi* 
live response to Chateau Harris's inquiry* Ten ney oonsldnr It dssltels 
to get in tench with Jtr# T «abert and with tees Uaslett, ftoperintandent 



Honorable John R* 
State of Missouri 


Honorable John K» Efeltcn 


-2. 


March 30 $ 1961 


at the Kansu City School tywtm, vhioh operates Chaxmrl 19. If I can 
give yon soy additional inforartlon that will be helpful, please call 
on roe* 

**!th mrm retards. 

Sincerely yours. 


Henry F. Ch&daayae 

^rwmitiee Director 


/>*! 





EXECUTIVE OFFICE 
State of Missouri 
Jefferson City 


John M. Dalton April 3> 1961 

Governor 


Mr. Henry F, Chadeayne 
Executive Director, KETC 
6996 Millbrook Boulevard 
St, Louis 30, Missouri 

Dear Mr. Ch a deayne: 

I have your recent letter about the pending proposals in 
Congress on educational television. I have received an inquiry 
from Congressman Harris and am glad to have the benefit of your 
views and your experience. 

As you suggested, I am asking Doctor Lambert and Mr. Hazlett 
for their ideas and am also making inquiry of the State Department 
of Education. On the basis of the information which I receive, I 
will then give a reply to Congressman Harris*s inquiry. 

Your interest is deeply appreciated. 

Sincerely yours. 


GOVERNOR 


MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY east lansing 


DIVISION OF BROADCASTING SERVICES • RADIO STATIONS • WKAR • WKAR-FM • TELEVISION STATION WMSB 


March 31, 1961 


Honorable John B. Bennett 
Member of Congress 
Washington 25, D. C. 


Dear Mr. Bennett: 

I thought you might be interested in seeing the attached statement 
which I gave recently before the Subcommittee in connection with 
the hearings on Federal aid to educational television. It repre¬ 
sents the great interest which the schools and educational interests 
have in the possibility of developing an educational television ser¬ 
vice for the state of Michigan. As you will see from the report, 
it is the southern part of the state that will receive most of the 
service of this type under the existing and planned conditions. 

Only through a state network system can these special educational 
services be made available to the northern part of the state and 
the upper peninsula. It is in these areas that the greatest need 
exists for additional instructional resources in the fields of science, 
mathematics, language, music and the arts; an it is these special 
resources which television can bring to the schools and the com¬ 
munities most effectively. 


Thanks for your interest in education and its services to our 
people. I know that you will give the question serious consider¬ 
ation and your best judgment. 

Sincerely yours, 


Armand L. Hunter 
Director of Broadcasting 


ALH:jf 

Attachment 


cc: Harold E. Hill-/ 



r 



Memo from the desk of: 

William G. Parley 

V Mlrck 

Olw. ?tCO 1 

u (^U-VV- —' 

/^v|v 

/ ^ ~T\r 

Vhlr ok ^ 

/,„ .1^ J<fU^WVW*-,fi«» 
12. c4- 


/ Cy/'f'W— J‘ei^v\r7i k v ■ * x * f 

d^A l j 

Yk ^tJL^ 


tdliMsr ? T" jjM-^ 




HtiterjatJg xtf Arizona 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 
TUCSON 25, ARIZONA 


March 31, 19& 


Bear Governor Fannin: 

Th» national Association of Motional Broadcasters has advised 
me that Representative Gren Barrie, casalraan of the Bouse 
Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee, indicated a desire 
that tbs Governor of each state submit to that Committee views 
regarding the state's interest in and plans for improving edu¬ 
cational television facilities should federal support legis¬ 
lation be passed in the current session of the Congress. I am 
informed that there is a strong possibility that such legis¬ 
lation will be passed. 

leading by television is becoming more and more established in 
various parte of the country, trough the educational television 
stations excellent instruction is being given. Mid educational 
endeavors of other kinds are being carried out very successfully* 
A bill before the Congress to provide one million dollars in 
each state to improve educational television facilities over the 
next five years, if passed, will result in much progress here in 
Arizona. 

fhe University of Arizona television Station, K0AT, has made a 
place for itself daring the two years of its operation that far 
exceeds the expectation at the time the station was established. 
We have taught a sunfcer of courses by television with very 
satisfactory results* Since the station operates on the open 
circuit basis, people throughout the cosaaunity have enjoyed the 
benefits of these lectures in a variety of fields, including 
chemistry, anthropology, Spanish, government, and art. At 
the same time we have had videotape recordings that give to 
people within the range of KUA.T insights into many areas of 
knowledge. 

Wb received virtually all of the money for the establishment of 
the television station from outside sources, mainly the Ford 
Foundation. In the future as the instructional program by 
television expands, it will be necessary to provide a new and 
more powerful transmitter and additional studio facilities. In 


2 


fact, we will need about one-half million dollars for this 
equipment and additional building facilities. We are moving 
out of the stage in which experimentation was conducted to 
determine the feasibility of instruction by television into 
the stage of established and normal acceptance of television 
as a means of teaching that for certain purposes is superior 
to conventional classroom instruction. 

X hope this information will be helpful to you in connection 
with the inquiry that has come from Representative Harris. 


Respectfully yours, 



The Honorable Paul J. Fannin 
Governor of the State of Arizona 
State House 
Phoenix, Arizona 

RAH: ckc 

be: t/kc. Harold E. Hill 
Dr. Ben C. Markland 
Dr. Robert L. Nugent 
Dr. David L. Patrick 


CHANNEL © 



March 31, 1961 


Mr. Harold Hill 
NAEB 

1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Harold: 

Your wire arrived while I was away working on the survey. 

Governor Brown has been contacted and is prepared to speak 
to the point of California's plans for ETV. 

I hope this information doesn't reach you too late. 

Best regards. 


JCC:drs 




/j John C. Crabbe 
/ General Manager 


CENTRAL CALIFORNIA H3r3XJC-A.TI03ST-A.Xj TEJnL.HJ'VTSIONT, INC. 












WILSON W. WYATT 
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 
CHAIRMAN 

SENATE MEMBERS 
ALVIN KIDWELL 

PRESIDENT PRO TEM 

JAMES C. WARE 

MAJORITY FLOOR LEADER 

DURHAM W. HOWARD 

MINORITY FLOOR LEADER 



COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY 


HOUSE MEMBERS 
HARRY KING LOWMAN 
SPEAKER 

THOMAS L. RAY 

MAJORITY FLOOR LEADER 


BERT COMBS, Governor Leonard hislope 

MINORITY FLOOR LEADER 

LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION 

R. P. MOLONEY 

FRANKFORT majority caucus chairman 


CABELL D. FRANCIS 

MAJORITY CAUCUS CHAIRMAN 


O. O. DUNCAN 

MINORITY CAUCUS CHAIRMAN 


April 3, 1961 


PAUL W. CORNETT 

MINORITY CAUCUS CHAIRMAN 


CHARLES WHEELER 
DIRECTOR 


JAMES T. FLEMING 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 
National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters 

1346 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hill: 


We received your telegram on the morning of March 29. 
Shortly thereafter Mr. Wheeler, Director of the Legislative Research 
Commission, telephoned Governor Combs's office and informed one of 
the Governor's assistants of your message. Mr. Wheeler also informed 
the assistant of the status of our research, as well as of the existence 
of a possible plan for ETV in Kentucky which has been prepared by this 
organization. As of this morning (Monday) we have had no word from 
the Governor's office. Mr. Wheeler told them, however, that we would 
be "standing by" should they desire further information. 

A copy of the possible plan for ETV in Kentucky has been 
mailed to Len Press who is working at your office. Because it is pri¬ 
marily a service agency for the General Assembly, the Legislative 
Research Commission probably will confine itself to advising and con¬ 
sulting about ETV should any further action be taken by the State Government 
in Kentucky. 


Sincerely 




ES/pg 


Edward Schten 
Supervisor of Research 




SOUTHERN FlEOIOlSr^rj EDUCATION BOARD 


ISO SIXTH STREET, N. W. • ATLANTA 13, GEORGIA • TRINITY 5-9211 


April k, 1961 


AIR MAIL 


Dr. Harold E. Hill, Administrative Vice President 
National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
DuPont Circle Office Building 
13^6 Connecticut Avenue, N, W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 


Dear Harold; 


I will have a letter sent to Congressman Flynt re the Roberts Bill as early 
this week as possible. 


Dr. William McFarland, head of the Virginia Council on Higher Education, and 
Dr. H. I. Willett, Superintendent of the Richmond Public Schools, promised 
to discuss Congressman Harris’ letter with Governor Almond. State Superintendent 
Claude Purcell, State Department of Education, Atlanta, Georgia, agreed to take 
similar steps with Governor Vandiver. 


If you have not reached Governor Ellington in Tennessee, I suggest you alert 
Kenneth Wright at the University of Tennessee. Several people on the campus, 
particularly President Holt, would be personally interested in speaking to the 
Governor about Congressman Harris' letter. 


Do you have one or two spare copies of both the Magnuson Bill and Roberts Bill 
that you could send me? I have managed to be too generous with my copies. 


With best personal wishes, I am 


Sincerely yours. 


^// 


William L. Bowden 
Regional Programs Associate 


WLBicm 





THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 
ALBANY I 


OFFICE OF 

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 


April 3, 1961 


Mr. William J. Ronan 
Secretary to the Governor 
Executive Chamber 
State Capitol 
Albany 1, Mew York 

Dear Bills 

Wednesday, March 28, a Mr. Harold 
Hill called from the Washington headquarters 
of the National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters, to advise us that Congressman 
Oren Harris had recently written letters to 
all the Governors of the fifty states urgently 
requesting them to submit promptly a statement 
of their state’s future plans for educational 
television. Mr. Hill was anxious that our 
Department alert the Governor's office to the 
importance of an early reply from Governor 
Rockefeller to Congressman Harris* letter. 

This letter to you will fulfill that 
function and, at the same time, suggest to you 
that if we can be of assistance in formulating 
the Governor's reply we shall be only too glad 
to do so. Please call upon me if that is a 
possibility. 


Faithfully yours 


Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 


Rwald B. 
Harold Hill 
Flick 



Mors 
Almstead 


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 

AUSTIN 12, TEXAS 


SYSTEM OFFICES 
CHANCELLOR 


April 4, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
Suite 1119 

13^6 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hill: 

Unfortunately, Mr. Robert F. Schenkkan is ill and will have to be 
out of the office for a few days. 

Upon receipt of your wire of March 29 concerning the request by 
Chairman Oren Harris for information on state plans for activating 
educational television, we conferred with Governor Price Daniel. 

He had not yet received any such request, but I imagine it will be 
forthcoming within a few days. 

Governor Daniel is a truthful man and will not be inclined to 
go beyond the facts. However, he will tell Congressman Harris that 
the Texas Education Agency (our state department of education) is 
promoting and coordinating the development of educational television 
in the state, that the Legislature now in session is expected to pass 
a resolution authorizing the preparation of a state plan for educa¬ 
tional television, that much coordinated planning has already been 
achieved through voluntary cooperation of the agencies involved, and 
that there is high interest in the state in moving forward vigorously 
with the development of educational television. 

Actually, we have no official state plan and the governor cannot 
say this. However, he can state quite truthfully that his administra¬ 
tion and the State Board of Education are back of the proposed 
legislative action to establish such a plan, and that the chances of 



cc: Mr. R. F. Schenkkan 



April 4, 1961 


Mr. Harold Hill 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Harold: 

I'm sorry this travel became so expensive. I couldn't 
get tourist accommodations on such short notice. I hope 
it was worth the investment. 

Will you send me several travel voucher forms. I have 
travel to Seattle, Portland and the Los Angeles area in 
connection with the survey that I would like to clear up 
fairly soon. 


Thanks, 



Crabbe 

Manager 


JCC/db 

Enclosure 



CENTFl-AJL CALIFORNIA EIDXJC-A.TI03Sr-A.IL TELEVISION, INC. 









April A, 1961 




The Honorable Paul F. Schenck 
The House of Representatives 
Washington 29» D. C. 

Dear Congressman Schenck 

.any times in the past I have been privileged 
to commend you on your services. This time I should 
like to take the liberty of writing a note relative 
to sons specific legislation that I am sure you are 
acquainted with. 

The legislation referred to is on educational 
television. 1 hope you will examine this very care¬ 
fully. I have been working in educational television 
for seven years, and I submit that this is indeed 
worthy of your support. 


Very truly yours 


George Biersack 


GBiMJS 




Class of Service 

This is a fast message 
unless its deferred char¬ 
acter is indicated by the 
proper symbol. 


WESTERN UNION 

TELEGRAM 


W. P. MARSHALL. President 


y SYMBOLS ^ 


DL = Day Letter 


NL= Night Letter 


1 International 

Letter Telegram^ 




The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LQ^AL TIME at point of destination 

LLB246 CT821S 

PRB112 PR MWAOlo NL PO MOSCOW IDA 5 1961 APR 5 

HAROLD E HI LL, ADMIN VICE-PRE B _ 

NATIONAL .ASSN OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 
EDUCATI0NAL3R0ADCASTERS 1346 CONNECTICUT AVE WASHOC 
GOVERNOR INFORMED AND AGREEA BLE TO STATEWID E T-V PLANS. STATE 
FAVORS FEDERAL AID. WILL COOPERATE FULLY 
DR W W SNYDER UNIVERSITY OF IDA. 



/ 


T* 






















PETER MASIKO JR., executive dean 
CLIFFORD G. ERICKSON, dean 
Of Television Instruction 


Chicago City Junior College 

3400 NORTH AUSTIN AVENUE 


Chicago 34, Illinois 


TELEPHONE: SPRING 7-7900 


April 5 f 1961 


Hon. Dan Rostenkowski 
House of Representatives 
Washington 25, D. C. 

My dear Congressman: 

The Subcommittee on Communications and Power of your House 
Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee has been conducting 
hearings in connection with legislation to provide Federal aid 
to educational television. 

It was my privilege to prepare a statement for the Subcommittee 
on March 23, 1961. A copy of this presentation is included for 
your use. 

1 strongly support the position that Federal grants should be 
made available to the States to aid them in initiating and 
expanding educational service through educational television. 
Should you have time, when next you are in Chicago, I would be 
happy to meet with you in person to give you a broader back¬ 
ground in our experience with TV College and with WITW in 
Chicago and to expand on my reasons for supporting this Pederal 
legislation. 

You and your colleagues have the best wishes of your Chicago 
constituency as you continue your work in the present important 
legislative session. 


Cordially yours. 


Clifford 0. Erickson 

CGBsaw Dean of Television Instruction 

£nc. 

CC: Mr. Harold E. Hm 

Administrative Vice President 


BRANCHES OF THE CHICAGO CITY JUNIOR COLLEGE MAINTAINED BY THE CHICAGO BOARD OF EDUCATION 

AMUNDSEN BRANCH BOGAN BRANCH CRANE BRANCH FENGER BRANCH SOUTHEAST BRANCH WILSON BRANCH WRIGHT BRANCH 







STATE 


MICHIGAN 


COPY 


O F 

Executive Office Lansing 


PROCLAMATION 

EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING MONTH 


Michigan has always been in the forefront in education. Our schools, 
colleges and universities educate and train our children and our 
young men and women in the sciences, the arts and the professions. 
Because of our outstanding educational facilities and faculties, 
our people are one of our greatest assets. 

The Constitution of the State of Michigan sets forth that ’’the means 
to education shall forever be encouraged.” This our people have done. 
Our institutions of learning have met the challenges of changing eras 
and have kept pace with world progress. 

Education, like other facets of our society, has adapted itself to 
scientific advances. Michigan has pioneered in the application of 
broadcast media to education since 1922 and today enjoys the advantages 
extended by nine radio and two television education stations. More 
are in the planning stage. 

National recognition has been accorded our largest metropolitan area 
for its classroom use of television from the early grades through 
the college level. In addition, there are outstanding adult programs. 

Michigan»s educational television has shown repeatedly as a useful 
method of making quality instruction available to every school system 
and assuring superior utilization of overburdened instructional 
staffs. Great credit has been reflected on Michigan ! s educational 
system as programs have been loaned to school systems throughout 
the nation. 

THEREFORE, I, John B. Swainson, Governor of the State of Michigan, 
do hereby proclaim April, 1961, as 

EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING MONTH 

in Michigan, and urge all our people to give appropriate recognition 
to this phase of education and to encourage it as a means of providing 
the fullest benefits to all. 


Given under my hand and the Great 
Seal of the State of Michigan 
this Thirteenth Day of March in 
the Year of Our Lord One Thousand 
Nine Hundred Sixty-one and of the 
Commonwealth One Hundred Twenty-five. 

SEAL 


/s/ John B. Swainson 

GOVERNOR 


BY THE GOVERNOR: 


/s/ James M. Hare _ 

SECRETARY OF STATE 




April 5 


1961 




The Honorable Anther Nelsen 
U.S. Representative from Minnesota 
House Office Building 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Representative Nelsen: 

As I am sure you know KTCA-TV, under terms of a 
grant to its Board of Trustees from the Hill 
Foundation, has pioneered in the development of 
a Six-State Educational Television Network. Such 
a network will be of inestimable benefit to the 
children of Minnesota and the entire area but will 
probably be impossible without the provision of 
Federal aid to educational television. 

I enclose a copy of a House Concurrent Resolution 
adopted March 14th by the Minnesota Legislature 
which encourages the establishment of the Six- 
State Network. Similar resolutions have been 
passed in North Dakota and South Dakota. Similar 
legislation is now under consideration by the 
legislatures of Iowa, Nebraska and Wisconsin. 

Under these circumstances may I respectfully urge 
you to support such legislation wfcich, I understand, 
is now before the Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
Committee of the House of Representatives. 

Very truly yours, 



be: Harold Hill 

Chris Donaldson 









April 6, 1961 



Honorable Morgan M. Moulder 
House of Representatives 
Washington 25, B. C* 

Bear Morgan, 

I have been following with interest the work of the subcommittee on 
Communications and Power of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
Committee as you have been conducting hearings in connection with the 
consideration of legislation to provide federal aid to educational 
television. I was especially pleased that you called upon Ed Lambert of 
the University of Missouri to testify as a witness before you. 

May I add my support to this legislation which you are considering. 

We know that television is a powerful medium of communication. We know 
that this medium can be used effectively in education. We know, too, that 
educators will not be able to take full advantage of the medium for educa¬ 
tional purposes unless federal aid is forthcoming. 

Television, as an aid to education, can only be justified if it improves 
education or makes education more readily available to greater numbers of 
our citizens at less cost than other methods. It is difficult for any one 
institution to justify the initial outlay for television equipment. However, 
a federal grant would enable a more unified effort on the part of educators 
in the use of the medium. It is important that educators spend their efforts 
in utilization of the mediua rather than in attempting to obtain equipment. 

I hope that your committee will continue to work closely with the National 
Association of Educational Broadcasters, an organisation which represents, 

I think, the best cross section of thinking today by educators, who are 
aware of the problems associated with educational television broadcasting. 

Best wishes to you. 

Sincerely, 


Heal Balanoff, Chairman 
Television, Radio & Film Department 
and Director, Audio Visual Services 

KBijm 

bcc: Harold E. Hill 



I tk' ^ 


Congress of the United States 
House of Representatives 
, Washington, D. C. 

April 10, 1961 


Neal Balanoff, Chairman 
Television, Radio and Film Department 
Stephens College 
Columbia, Missouri 


RECEIVED 

NAEB - URBANA 

APR 15 1961 

AM 

V,C,t>,W J ||,«i (S|3|4|5i g 

A 




.pril 6, regarding 


Dear Neal: 

I deeply appreciate your ^ 

our hearings on educational television legislation. I am having 
your letter made a part of t^recoVq, of the hearings so that the 
other members of the Sortjnittee wilVjlave the benefit of your 
opinion on this legislation^^// 

With y^rtlesT^>^>^onal\r^gards, 

Sincerely yours. 


/s/t/ MORGAN M. MOULDER 




UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA 


GRAND FORKS 


OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 


April 7, 1961 


Dr. Hardd E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Dr. Hill: 

In reply to your telegram may I say that our Governor has been in 
Washington. He will be advised of your interest. 

I think the most significant activity I could report, and which I 
hope you will be able to use, is the fact that our 1961 state legis¬ 
lature passed an appropriation bill providing $46,350 for the support 
of educational television. This money is made available for the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction to use in contracts with non¬ 
profit corporations willing to provide additional funds for construction 
and other expense incident to the development of educational television 
in our state. 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction in North Dakota is Mr. M. F. 
Peterson, Bismarck, North Dakota. I do not believe concrete steps 
have been formalized for the use of this money. 

I might also point out that a committee called the North Central 
Educational Television Association, Inc. has been formed in this state 
to promote educational television in North Dakota. I am a member of 
that committee, and the chairman is Dr. T. L. Donat, 1702 South 13th St., 
Fargo, North Dakota. 

We at the University of North Dakota are very interested in extending 
our efforts, now confined to closed-circuit television, to the point 
where we can broadcast on channel two reserved for ETV in our area. 


Very truly yours, 



George W. Starcher 
President 


GWS:gj 







Room 112, Knott Building — Telephone: 3-5089 
TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA 


Members 

JUDSON FREEMAN, Chairman 
J. KENNETH BALLINGER 


JAMES ETHERIDGE, JR. 
Executive Secretary 


FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN 
NILES TRAMMELL 
JAMES L. WATTENBARGER 
STAN WITWER 


MYRON R. BLEE 


April 11, 1961 


Mr. Harold Hill, Administrative Vice President 
National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hill: 

As you requested in your telegram, we furnished Governor Bryant 
with further information regarding educational television planning in Florida, 
as well as a copy of the Commission statement which is in the record of the 
House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. 

However, the Governor's office had no record of having received an 
inquiry from Chairman Harris. 

We were most disturbed recently to learn of Vernon Bronson's illness 
and we earnestly hope that he is on the mend and is continuing the excellent 
job he is doing for NAEB and educational television generally. 



JE:mj 



Issued by Florida Educational Television Commission / Room 112, Knott Bldg. / Tallahassee, Florida 


December 2, I960 

FLORIDA IS WAY OUT FRONT ! 


Of the 50 ETV stations on the air in the Nation, Florida has five of them -- more 
than any other state. (See list, addresses, Page 3). 

When Florida's fifth ETV station -- WFSU-TV, Channel 11, Tallahassee -- went 
on the air Sept. 19, I960, it coincidentally became the 50th ETV station in the country. 


STATE NETWORK 


Florida's five stations are linked in a State network by means of the production 
and exchange of video tape-recorded courses and programs. The Commission has found 
that for current purposes the video tape network is not only the most economical method 
of transmission, but also provides flexibility for local curriculum planning and scheduling. 


FROM KINDERGARTEN TO ADULT EDUCATION -- AT HOME 

The range of courses being broadcast runs from programs for pre-school age chil¬ 
dren in their homes, through elementary, secondary and junior college in-classroom 
instruction, to university level, adult education courses and general information and cul¬ 
tural programs. 

An estimated 300, 000 students are receiving some instruction or enrichment pro¬ 
grams via educational television. The total of such "TV students " has approximately 
doubled in each of the last two years, and it appears that this rate of increase will con¬ 
tinue if necessary broadcasting and receiving facilities are made available. 

Universities and junior colleges are working out procedures by which regular col¬ 
lege credits can be earned at home by taking courses by TV . 


WHAT HAS ETV DONE ? WHAT CAN IT DO ? 

1. MAINTAINING QUALITY INSTRUCTION, in spite of mounting enrollment pressures 
and problems, has been -- and is -- the primary aim of the Commission and the many 
classroom teachers and administrators who are so earnestly working with us, but -- 

2. ETV HAS ALSO SAVED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS in terms of doing many essential 
tasks at substantially less than traditional methods cost. 

Supt. Joe Hall of Dade County says that ETV, used with the "extended day" 
schedule, has eliminated the need for approximately $4 million worth of new 
classroom construction. Some school plants are handling up to 30% more 
students than they were constructed for -- because ETV makes fuller use of 
auditoriums, gymnasia, cafetoriums, choral rooms, band rooms and other 
large, high-cost space with limited use heretofore. 

Supt. Hall also says ETV has made possible a more efficient and economical 





















Page 2 
News letter 


re-deployment of teachers according to children's needs and teachers 1 
abilities. Large-class instruction in some subject fields has released other 
teachers to give more time to smaller groups in basic needs, such as remedial 
reading, mathematics, counseling, increasing use of libraries, etc. 


DADE WILL CONSTRUCT ANOTHER STATION 

The Dade County School Board is applying to the Federal Communications Commis¬ 
sion for a permit to build and operate a second ETV station! Just not enough hours in the 
day for its one station -- WTHS, Channel 2 — to meet all the needs. Pittsburgh and 
Oklahoma City Schools already operate two ETV stations in their areas. 


IN SEVEN COUNTIES OF THE PINELLAS-HILLSBOROUGH AREA, Director 
Thomas Rothchild of the in-school instructional program broadcast by ETV station WEDU 
Channel 3, Tampa-St. Petersburg, says that among 27 schools in that area using educa¬ 
tional television, there was a net instructional saving of $180, 000 last year and a class¬ 
room construction saving of $430, 000. 

"With educational television, " he sums up, "we can teach more children more 
effectively -- and save money doing it ! " 

(Of course TV does NOT -- and cannot -- "replace" classroom teachers . It simply 
helps them do an even better job, by providing them with "a transparent blackboard" 
through which they can bring the whole world to their students; by giving them more time 
for small-class or even individual instruction where needed; and by demonstrating that 
the job they do deserves greater prestige and income. School enrollments will continue 
to increase so rapidly that Florida could train and employ teachers at twice the present 
rate -- and still not be able to do the public education job satisfactorily unless effective 
use of TV helps with the task. ) 

OTHER THINGS WHICH ETV IS DOING: 

-- providing small county school systems with good instruction in some fields in 
which the counties cannot find, or cannot afford to pay, the most competent 
instructors; 

-- distributing the skill of the specially gifted teacher to many times as many 
students as she could teach in a single classroom; 

-- enabling classroom presentation of many resources and demonstrations which 
could not otherwise be provided; 

-- giving opportunity for fast learners to move at a pace commensurate with their 
abilities, and providing, at lower cost, the repetition necessary for slower 
learners. 


PLANS FOR THE EXTENSION OF ETV IN FLORIDA 

The ETV Commission and the STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION will soon 
announce plans for submission to the 1961 Legislature for proposed extension of ETV 
service to more county school systems and public institutions of higher learning. 


Among other proposed extensions, the ETV Commission is working with a recently 












Page 3 
Newsletter 


created non-profit educational corporation, Florida Central East Coast ETV, Inc., 
formed by public school officials and civic leaders in Orange, Volusia, Brevard, Seminole 
and other counties in that fast-growing area, to petition the Federal Communications Com¬ 
mission for a drop-in of a Channel 11 frequency near Orlando so that another ETV station 
might be activated with local and State funds -- if the latter are made available. This is 
one of several possible network extensions that the Florida ETV Commission is requesting. 

FOR THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION , State School Superintendent 
Thomas D. Bailey appointed a committee (Chairman: Mr. James L. Graham, Director of 
Administration and Finance, State Department of Education, Capitol, Tallahassee) to rec¬ 
ommend sound plans for assisting county school systems in financing the use of televised 
instruction. This committee has been working for more than three months and is ex¬ 
pected to announce its recommendations soon. 

YOUR SUPERINTENDENT, SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS, PRINCIPALS , 

TEACHERS AND PARENTS may wish to watch for announcement of these proposals 
(comment, suggestions and inquiries welcomed!) and discuss them with your 
Legislators before the session next April. 


FLORIDA ETV STATIONS, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICERS, AND THEIR ADDRESSES: 


Channel 2, WTHS, Miami 
Mr. Clif Mitchell, Director of TV 
Lindsey Hopkins Building 
1410 Northeast Second Avenue 

Channel 3, WEDU, Tampa-St. Petersburg 

Tampa Studio : 

Mr. LeRoy Lastinger, General Manager 
908 South 20th Street 

St. Petersburg Studio : 

Mrs. Aimee Erwin, General Manager 
6605 Fifth Avenue, North 

Channel 5, WUFT, Gainesville 

Dr. Kenneth Christiansen, Director of TV 

West Stadium 

Channel 7, WJCT, Jacksonville 

Mr. Gregory Heimer, General Manager 

Post Office Box 4758 


Channel 11, WFSU-TV, Tallahassee 
Mr. Roy Flynn, Director 

Broadcasting Services 


Owned and operated by Dade County 
Board of Public Instruction 


Owned and operated by Florida West 
Coast Educational Television, Inc., 
a non-profit civic and educational 
corporation on whose Board of 
Directors are representatives of 
seven county school systems. 


Owned and operated by the State Board 
of Control and the University of Florida 


Owned and operated by Educational 
Television, Inc., - a non-profit civic and 
educational corporation; and by Duval 
County School Board. 

Owned jointly by the State Board of Control, 
Florida Educational Television Commission 
and Florida State University which operates 
it. 


They f ll be happy to have you visit them, and we r ll be happy for you to visit the 
Florida ETV Commission Office, Room 112, Knott Building, Tallahassee, too! 













Robert F. Wagner 
Mayor 



Seymour N. Siegel 

Director 


WNYC 


THE CITY OF NEW YORK 


MUNICIPAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM 



MUNICIPAL BUILDING 

NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 
WHHahall 3-3600 


WNYC-FM 


April 13, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 
National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 
DuPont Circle Office Building 
13^6 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 
Washington 6, D.C. 

Dear Harold: 


I have your note of March 28th and I have 


already done what I could to be of help. 


With all best wishes, believe me 


Cordially yours. 


Seymour jm . siege i 
Director 



SNS/cb 


" The Voice Of The 


City 



fiV cw- 



NASHVILLE EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION FOUNDATION 


University of Tennessee Nashville Center 

810 BROADWAY 
NASHVILLE 3. TENN. 


ALPINE 6-4798 


April 13, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative lice President 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Harold: 

Jfy reply to your telegram is delayed because our secretary resigned 
last week because of ill health and my new secretary just started today. 

I took the matter up with the State Department of Education. Immediately 
it ended up with my roughing out a letter from Govenor Ellington 
to Oren Harris and preparing a slight more detailed report to be sent 
by Joe Morgan, Commissioner of Education. 

Passage of the House bill and signing by the President would be a 
great boon to our state. It would mean we in Nashville would 
have Channel 2 on with full powe r. It would mean a step in Knoxville 
very soon, and would certainly hasten the arrangements in Chattoonoga. 

Keep me posted. 



Wegener, General Manager 


yours, 


EW/sm 




THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 
LINCOLN 8, NEBRASKA 


UNIVERSITY TELEVISION 


KUON-TV / CHANNEL. 12 


April 12, 1961 



t' 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 
NAEB 

Dupont Circle Office Building 
134-6 Connecticut Ave. , N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Harold: 

Governor Morrison just yesterday announced receipt 
of Representative Harris’ letter of inquiry. He 
shunted it to the University and to me for reply. 

A draft is on its way back to the Governor's office 
for forwarding. If he says one fourth of the 
things written for him, Nebraska is in good shape. 

We had on April 3 met with the Governor to brief 
him on the entire situation and believe we have 
a friend sitting behind that desk. 

As soon as we receive copies of the actual letter 
of transmittal, we will forward same to your office. 

Cheers. 


r 



Sincerely 


Director of Television 
and KUON-TV 





April 22, 1961 


Mr. William H. Rice 
Governor 1 s Office 
Springfield, Illinois 

Dear Bill* 

For possible assistance to the Governor, and for 
his information, I*m enclosing a suggested draft of a letter 
he might use in replying to the Inquiry from Congressman Oren 
Harris, a copy of Wisconsin’s Governor to a similar Inquiry, 
and an NAEB special report which has some background on the 
pending legislation. 

Bill, the Governor might also wish to consider the 
possibilities of appointing a Statewide Educational Television 
Commission. I’m sure there would be little difficulty in 
securing Legislative approval. One such resolution was intro¬ 
duced last session, but it was ill advised because it didn’t 
get into channels. I know that Mr. Wilkins has a Committee on 
Teaching Aids, but this is not pin-pointed on BTV. Just a 
suggestion. If any help needed at anytime, you know 1*11 be 
happy to aid. 

And, to you, sir, many thanks for your trouble. 

Sincerely, 


Frank E. Schooley 
Director, University 
Broadcasting 




DRAFT 


Congressman Oren Harris, Chairman 
Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
Room 1334, House Office Building 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Congressman Harris: 

This is in reply to your letter of March 28 inquiring about the 
interest of pending federal legislation as it might affect the 
State of Illinois. I wish to express general approval of the 
educational television legislation now being considered by your 
committee, although, obviously, I am making no Judgment on the 
details of the various proposals before you. 

Interest in and action about educational television has already 
been manifested In Illinois. The University of Illinois has had 
an ETV station on the air since 1955# Southern Illinois University 
Is In the process of constructing one, and in Chicago the metro¬ 
politan area Is being served by a community ETV station. Closed- 
circuit use of television for Instructional purposes has been 
going on in some of our schools for some time. For example, 
Evanston Township high school. WTTV in Chicago, in cooperation 
with the Chicago Board of Education, has been presenting 
instruction for the Chicago Teacher Colleges. 

I feel that educational television In Illinois would be further 
developed if federal aid and encouragement were to be given. In 
the long run, television may be one of the important aids in 
meeting the heavy demands of society on our educational institu¬ 
tions at all levels. In Illinois we have six state supported 
universities, and many Junior colleges, in addition to our 
elementary and secondary schools. I foresee the use of television 
by many of them in the years ahead. 

I shall be happy to furnish you with additional information at 
anytime it would be helpful* 

Sincerely yours. 


FESfb 


SITY OF TEXAS 
RADIOAELEVISION 

MEMORANDUM DATE; May 19, 1961 

To: Harold Hill 

From: Bob Schenkkan 



Attached letter from Governor Daniel to Oren Harris for your information. 


i'»’ t;.. i v ?. 

NAEB HtiAOyUARTERS 

MAY 2 2 1961 
71 ? 19 1 10 1 11 1 12 1 1 | 2 } 8 | 4 | 6 |? 

I 



PRICE DANIEL 
OOVCRNO* 


EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 


AUSTIN 11. TEXAS 


May 1. 1961 



MAY 2 2 1961 


c 


Honorable Oren Harris 
House of Representatives 
House Offies Building 
Washington, D. C. 



Dear Congressman Harris: 


I would llks to supplement the information given you in 
my letter of April 14 concerning the development of educational 
television in Texas. 


p 


The Texas Education Agency is authorized to plan and 
coordinate the development of educational television services in 
the State. Its accustomed method of operation is to undertake 
such development by the formation of advisory commissions and 
committees, by conducting studies, and by formulating leadership- 
type proposals which are accepted by local authorities and state¬ 
wide organizations. Just this week it is launching a large 
statewide demonstration projset in the use of new educational 
media in which educational television plays a prominent role. 

Financing, erecting, and operating educational television 
stations is a local responsibility in this State. A ruling of our 
Attorney General makes it clear that local school districts and 
junior college dletrlcte have legal power to use tax funds for the 
purchase of educational television services. A new educational 
television station is soon to go on the air in the San Antonio-Austin 
with a large share of its operating funds coming from such 
support. 

I® briaf, the State of Texas has adequate machinery to 
formulate a statewide plan for educational television and to 
allocate any funds which be corns available for the construction, 
equipment, and operation of non-profit educational broadcasting. 



Honorable Oran Harris 
May U. 1961 

Pip 2 


*“ ,uch development appears to be high. When e 

r“ T -“- E -“«“ *• i— 


KlxuUft personal regards. 


Sincerely yours. 


PD:js 


Copy to Mr. L. D. Haske* 
Mr. Bob Schenkkan 


i'l&V- 


For Release Upon Deli* 





Statement 

by 

Abraham Ribicoff 

Secretary of Healthy Education, and Welfare 
before tbe 

Subcommittee on Communications and Power 
of the 

Committee on,Interstate and Foreign Commerce 
United States House of Representatives 
Wednesday, May 17, 1961, IOiOO a.m., EDT 


Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committeej 

I appreciate this opportunity to appear before you to offer this 
testimony relating to six bills designed to complete a nationwide system 
of educational television. 

I am here to support the general objective of these bills. 

I shall also suggest some modifications through which I believe 
this objective will be more quickly and efficiently achieved. The modifi¬ 
cations would be to meet technical situations in the television field. 

The bills on which I am making this statement are: H.R. 9^5 'by 
Representative Oren Harris of Arkansas $ H.R. 132 sponsored by Representative 
Kenneth A. Roberts of Alabama] H.R. 5099 by Representative Byron 0. Rogers 
of Colorado] H.R. 5536 by Representative Harris McDowell of Delaware] 

H.R. 2910 by Representative Clifford G. Mclntire of Maine] and H.R. 645 by 
Representative Hale Boggs of Louisiana. 

The very fact that these gentlemen come from geographical areas so 
widely scattered over the country is evidence of the general need for this 
legislation. 

F,a^b of these bills would authorize, for the purpose of educational 

% 

television, grants to the States of a total not to exceed $1 million in any 
State. These grants would be used to assist public agencies and nonprofit 
organizations to acquire broadcasting apparatus for educational television. 




2 


, H.R. 932, H.R. 5099, ani H.R. 5336 lacXute two further provisione* 

1. State matching of Federal funds on a 50-50 basis. 

2* State surveys of the needs for educational television and 
State plans for a construction program. 

We recommend the inclusion of Buch provisions in the legislation* 

I do not believe that ETV stations will have enough vitality to survive 
unless the areas they serve show enough interest and put up at least half 
the funds* And I consider the most careful planning absolutely essential 
if the entire country is to be served by educational television. 

For the surveys and plans we recommend the same amount mentioned in 
the three bills, an authorization of $520,000, with not more than $10,000 
to be granted to any State 0 

For construction, we recommend the authorization of $25 million 
which when matched by the States would mean an investment which will average 
about $1 million for each State, which is included in all the bills* 

The total authorization for Federal grants in the 4 years would thus 
be $25,520,000* 

In addition, and for the technical reasons which will be developed 
in this testimony, we recommends 

1 * That provisions be included whereby State plans may be developed 
cooperatively into interstate or regional plans. 

2* That construction grants be made on a project-by-project and not 
& State-by-State basis* 

Any one of the bills now before you could be modified to meet our 


recommendations 


- 3 - 

This Administration Favors ETV 


' • ?. 

This administration strongly favors a nationwide system of 

educational television. Bo domestic challenge which faces us is more crucial 
than education. 

Educational television could help us catch up on our school work, 
in which, X regret to say, we are behind. It could focus sustained 
national attention on music, art, literature and drama.j 

It could help us to make scientific progress. 

And educational television will advance as science advances. 

Already an experiment is underway on an airborne instructional 
program in the Midwest, We look forward to a future in which information 
and instruction may be conveyed from nation to nation through installations 
in outer space. 

President Kennedy in his education message of February 21 this year 
said: "Our twin goals must be a new standard of excellence in education— 
and the availability of such excellence to all who are willing and able to 
pursue it." 

The achievement of those two goals could be hastened by the legislation 
now before you. Television is as great in its possibilities of increasing the 
excellence of education as the invention of printing was in its time. And no 
medium has ever equaled television in availability to all. 

Of course we all understand that television will never do all of 
our education. It will never supplant person-to-person and classroom 
teaching. Television is simply a powerful Instrument to open up many more 
vistas in the lifelong educational process. 



rjJ- 


x 


h° 


' ' - 4 - 

The States Are Ready for ETV 

The chairman of your full committee, Representative Oren Harris, 

recently sent an -Inquiry to the Governors of all the States with‘regard to 

Y 

their readiness to participate in a cooperative Federal-State matching program 
for the establishment of educational television plans and facilities. 

The replies were turned over to our Department for analysis. 

Twenty-five replies from Governors were in the affirmative. These 
came from Alabama, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois,'Maryland, Massachu¬ 
setts, Michigan, Minnesota,’Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, 

New Mexico, North Carolina, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, 

Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington, and the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. 

Eight replies were indefinite. In these cases,-the question was 
pending before State legislatures, or the opinion of another official was 
being sought, or the Governor was not yet ready to deal with the question. 
These replies were from Alaska, Delaware, Kansas, Maine, Nevada, New Hamp¬ 
shire, Ohio, and the District of Columbia, 

Fourteen States have not yet been heard from. From other records, 
however, we know that six of these have one or more operating educational 
television stations within their borders. They are Colorado, Florida, 

It seems reasonable to anticipate that 




later replies from these areas will maintain the high ratio of affirmative 
responses evidenced by those already in hand. 

A Good Foundation Has Been Laid 
Many here remember the dramatic hearings before the Federal 
Communications Commission in 1952 which resulted in the reservation of a 
block of television channels for educational television. 


? J 




- 5 - 


I- 

These hearings made possible the ETV stations now broadcasting 
in this country, which we now seek to add to and also to link together 
in networks for broadcasts important to an entire area. 

The evidence presented to the FGC in 1952 was impressive indeed. 

It had been assembled by trained researchers who sat, hour after hour, day 
after day, in front of television sets in New York, Chicago, and Los 
Angeles, The subject matter on all channels was charted and analyzed 
from sign-on to sign-off—so many minutes devoted to entertainment, to 
crime, and violence, to advertisements, to education and culture. 

Obviously educational television is needed as much now as it was 
in 1952, and we are encouraged by Federal Communications Commission Chairman 
Newton Minow's announcement that he will do all in!hisjpower to promote a 
nationwide educational television system. 

The channels set aside for educational use in 1952 totaled 242. 

These have since been increased to 268, of which 90 are VHF (very high 
frequency) and 178 are UHF (ultra high frequency). 

These are all open-circuit stations and include such important trail- 
blazers as the dommunity-supported stations of Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, 
Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and New Orleans. 

The typical educational television station devotes its schoolday 
hours to programs for the classroom at all levels—elementary, secondary, 
and higher. The late afternoon is usually devoted to programs for women 
and children, whereas the evenings are devoted to adult education as well 
as cultural and educational types of programming. 

Of the stations now on the air, about 40 percent are financed and 
controlled by universities, about 20 percent are part of a public school 
system, and the remaining 40 percent are sponsored by independent community 
agencies. 


- 6 - 


Two cities, Oklahoma City and Pittsburgh, already have started 
their second ETV stations. Miami and Milwaukee have applied for their 
second allocations. 

In contrast, there are great areas still largely unserved by ETV. 
One of them is the vast metropolitan complex starting in New England and 
reaching on down to Washington, D.C., and Virginia. 

In much of this area, which includes about one-fifth of the popu¬ 
lation of the United States, commercial stations had been set up to use 
all existing channels before the FCC set-aside for educational television 
was made. New York State conducts its extensive programs of ln-school 
television over a commercial station. A study is now underway to find out 
if frequency allocations are available to set up a regional educational 
television network in this highly populated area-which, incidentally, 
is exceptionally rich in education resources. 

All the VHP channels reserved by the FCC in areas of more than 
300,000 population have now been assigned. 

The task of the next k years will be stimulating new VHF 
stations in low-population areas and in making use of the UHF channels 
in all areas needing ETV. 

Where it is in use, ultra high frequency television has been well 
accepted. Its adoption has been hampered by the fact that the manufacturers 
have not produced many sets capable of receiving UHF. However, it is 
entirely possible to produce TV sets which receive all frequencies. 

The problem now being faced by this committee is to make it possible 
for the remaining bands to be used in such a fashion as to best serve 
the population which does not yet have access to educational television. 

It is obvious from the situation I have described that the plans and 


- 7 - 

services often should be Interstate or regional and that the allocations 
of funds should be project by project, rather than State by State,, 

Our Proposals 

Our proposals are put Into legal language In my letter to the 
Chairman which I hereby furnish for the record. 

In essence, these proposals provide for: 

Surveys and program development ,-*-We recommend authorization of 
$520,000 t o enable the Commissioner of Education to make grants to the 
States to cover one-half the costs of conducting surveys and developing 
programs for educational television. Hot more than $10,000 would bq 
granted to any State, The legislation should make clear that multistate, 
area, or regional planning and surveys would be encouraged. Modifications 
of the requirements otherwise applicable on a State basis to facilitate 
accomplishment of this objective should be authorized. 

Projects for construction of ETV facilities.—The legislation should 
authorize the Commissioner of Education to make grants on a project basis 
under priorities to be established. The criteria for such priorities 
should be designed to achieve the prompt and effective use of the available 
channels, equitable geographical distribution of the facilities throughout 
the country, and the setting up of the facilities in such a way as to serve 
the greatest number of people and broadest uses possible. We recommend an 
aggregate of $25 million to be authorized over a 4-year period to pay up to 
onerhalf ^the costs of approved projects. This would be matched by the pay¬ 
ment of one-half the costs by the individual sponsoring agency. 

If State plans have been made, the grants would proceed in accordance 
with the State plan. If not, the grants could be made available by the 
Commissioner directly after the State has had a reasonable opportunity to 
prepare such a plan. 





- 8 - 


Our proposals would include a definition in the bill which would 
exclude from Federal grants closed-circuit transmission within a single 
school or occupy!^ a single site. We do not believe Federal funds are 
warranted for this limited type of facilities. 


other pieces of legislation 


Research and Experimentation . —.Two 
recommended by the Kennedy administration could round out Office of Educa- 
tion services to educational television. 


One is the "Educational Assistance Act of 1961 " which provides for 
new demonstration programs to meet special education problems. Such pro¬ 
grams might include the use of a new media such as television. 

The other is currently in progress—the provision under title VII 
of the National Defense Education Act whereby research is being carried on 
to evaluate and aid in the development of television and other audio-visual 
education media. Resident Kennedy has recommended that the National 
Defense Education Act, which expires next July 1, be extended and improved. 

ETV Has Proven Its Worth 

Educational television has proven its worth. More than 50 careful 
studies provide evidence that anything that can be taught by lecture and 
demonstration in the classroom can be taught at least as well by television. 

As one example, a complete junior college curriculum has been on the 
air for 5 years in Chicago. It has been taken by thousands of students. 
Tests have proven that these televised courses have brought students to the 
level of skill attained by classroom practice. 

There have been spectacular demonstrations that television can do 
certain instructional tasks much better than they can be done in the 
classroom. 




- 9 - 

For instance, in test-tube chemistry and other courses requiring 
minute motions, every television student can watch as well as though he 
were in the front row in the classroom. 

A 10-member educational media study panel of the Office of 
Education met in January and,’ on the basis of the 50 studies, compiled 
a list of the areas in which educational television appears to offer 
important advantages. A summary of their findings follows: 

1 . Educational television affords unique opportunities for massive 
and rapid qualitative improvement of education which is now a national 
challenge. 

2 . Educational television provides a means of removing the harriers 
which have kept American teachers from being able to observe their colleagues 
in action. For years teachers never see other teachers in action—it is 

as though actors could never see plays. 

3. Educational television gives parents a chance to get hack into 
the orhit of education. They can look at will into the classroom. 

b. Educational television offers opportunities to focus national 
attention and effort on general cultural improvement. 

5. Educational television, hy strengthening the fiber of our own 
education and culture, will also provide the needed basis for strengthening 
similar efforts elsewhere in the free world. 

Educators Have Accepted TV 

For some years educational leaders were cautious about using tele¬ 
vision in the classroom. There were even fears that TV would replace the 
teachers, that it would make teaching mechanical, and that pupils would 
become mere robots. 


10 


Wine years of experience with educational television stations have 
brought the whole subject into perspective. Educators have learned that 
TV is neither a curse por a cure-all. They have learned that it is simply 
another medium for getting ideas across—and a very powerful one. 

As I see it, the legislation you are considering today has for its 
primary purpose making educational television available to every section 
of the United States where it is needed and can be useful. 

It seems to me that the time is ripe for such action. The adminis¬ 
tration is ready for it. The States are ready for it. The foundation has 
been laid. Experience has proven its worth. And the educators now accept 


it. 




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Mr * JEL F. Sehenkic&ii 
Director, Badio/jtelevisian 
?he University of Jttexas 
Austin 12, Rscas 

Dear Bob: 


SjSl V guess would be that Governor 

iJjfSiTJ - fj* ei ' rea Harris' office too late to be 

at aver to HEW in tine for them to include it in their analysis 

^rS£?Mb?Sr£ '^shington Report was ext^rteTSS 

I «« sure that Governor Daniel's 
now beea mas a jmxt at the cosaaittee records. 

" l * l6hington ^DOTt" night have been 
,^ s t “! h 1 ®f*^ ap r f^ t - Saue ^r I had hoped that w wording^ 
^ t r: , t 1 1 ” M l te evir5ent that 1 was quoting ft?» Ribi^ff's 
estiusoy. Incidentally «e are wry grateful far all the work: 
ttet you have done in this regard. I Just hope that you a^ fLu™, 
better^ and that you will so^ be «L to C SS 22?* 


to try to get President 

r<» ow aMweaUon here this fall. If we are unable to do 
event^ J^Sd if *"**«* In this 

someone here? I would appreciate your SaTs^ra^Sis. 

Cordially, 


Harold S, Sin ,, 

Adiainigtratlve Vice President 


HSEtklp 






ROBERT F. SCHENKKAN, DIRECTOR 



RADIO / TELEVISION 

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 

AUSTIN 12, TEXAS 


May 25, 1961 


RECEIVED 

NAEB HEADQUARTERS 

MAY 2 9 1961 

»* p* 

7l?lP|lPll.l|l,2| l|2]3|4|i>i6 

t 


GREENWOOD 8-669 I 


Mr. Harold Hill 
NAEB Headquarters 

1346 Connecticut Ave. - Suite 1119 
Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Harold: 

I received the Washington Report of June, 1961, 
and in the roll call of affirmative replies 
from the governors, I do not see Texas. 

I enclose with this note copies of Governor 
Daniel’s letter to Chairman Harris. I think 
you will agree this is affirmative. 

Regards, 



RFS:am 
enclosure 





PRICE DANIEL 
GOVERNOR 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

AUSTIN 1 1. TEXAS 

May 1, 1961 


RECEiV o 

NAEE HEADQUARTERS 

MAY 2 9 1961 

AW p 

?I?|»|10[11,12,1,2,3,4! 6,0 


c 

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Y 


Honorable Oran HarrU 
House of Rapresantatires 
House Office Building 
Washington, D. C. 

D*ar Congressman Harris: 

I would like to supplement the information given you in 
my letter of April 14 concerning the development of educational 
television in Texas. | 

The Texas Education Agency is authorized to plan and 
coordinate the development of educational television services in 
the State. Its accustomed method of operation is to undertake 
such development by the formation of advisory commissions and j 

committees, by conducting studies. 1 and by formulating leadership* 
type proposals which ars accepted by local authorities and state¬ 
wide organisations. Just this wssk it is launching a largo ! 

statewide demonstration project ia the use of new educational j 

media la which educational television plays a prominent role. 

Financing, erecting, and operating educational television 
stations is a local responsibility in this State. A ruling of our 
Attorney General makes it clear that local school districts and 
junior college districts have legal power to use tax funde for the 
purchase of educational television services. A new educational 
television station is soon to go on the air in the San Antonio-Austin 
area with a Urge share of its operating funds coming front such 
support. 

In brief, the State of Texas has adequate machinery to 
formulate a statewide pUm for educational television and to 
allocate any funds which become available for toe construction, 
equipment, and operation of non-profit educational broadcasting. 

i 

} 




T' ' ! ' ■ 'V ; . . 








Honorable Oron Harris 
May u, 1961 

Page 2 


Interest in such development appears to be high. When a 
sufficient number of stations can be activated, they can 
^ih the leadership of the Texas education Agency be joined 
In a statewide network. 

Kindest personal regards. 


Sincerely yours, 


PDrjs 


Copy to Mr. L. D. Ha skew 
Mr. Bob Schenkkan 



PRICE DANIEL 
GOVERNOR 


EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

AUSTIN 1 1. TEXAS 

May i, 1961 


c 

o 

p 

Y 


Honorable Oren Harris 
House of Representatives 
House Office Building 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Congressman Harris: 

1 would like to supplement the information given you in 
my letter of April 14 concerning the development of educational 
television in Texas. 

The Texas Education Agency is authorized to plan and 
coordinate the development of educational television services in 
the State. Ite accustomed method of operation Is to undertake 
such development by the formation of advisory commissions and 
committees, by conducting studies, and by formulating leadership- 
type proposals which are accepted by local authorities and state¬ 
wide organisations. Just this week it is launching a large 
statewide demonstration project in the use of new educational 
media in which educational television plays a prominent role. 

Financing, erecting, and operating educational television 
stations Is a local responsibility in this State. A ruling of our 
Attorney General makes it clear that local school districts and 
junior college districts have legal power to use tax funds for the 
purchase of educational television services. A new educational 
television station is soon to go on the air in the San Aatoaio-Austla 
area with a large share of its operating funds coming from such 
support. 

In brief, the State of Texas has adequate machinery to 
formulate a statewide plan for educational television and to 
allocate any funds which become available for the construction, 
equipment, and operation of non-profit educational broadcasting. 



Honorable Oran Harrla 
May 11, 1961 

Pag* 2 


totaroat In *uch development appear* to be high. Whan a 

, °T L °* ' t * ti0n * * *'«vatad. thay can 
with th. laadar.hlp of the Teaaa Education Agency be joln.d 
In a statewide network. J ° 


Kind©tt personal regards. 


Sincerrly yours, 


PD: js 


Copy to Mr. L. D. Basket 
Mr. Bob Bchenkkaa 



Mississippi State University 

State college, Mississippi 



June 7, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
DuPont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hill: 

This will acknowledge your letter of June 5. We are communicating 
with Congressman William Colmer concerning the status of educa¬ 
tional television in Mississippi. 

Our gratitude continues for your leadership in this important 
educational activity. 



Sincerely yours. 


D. W. Colvard 
President 



NAEB HEADQUARTERS 


DWC:lcc 


N S 1961 


7l?l&tiP|ll|12|J|2|8|4|6|P 




Ji mm 9, 1961 


TWwvetn Tjedlrwor ia^lify 

Bouse of Re p re se ntatives 
Washington 25, B* C. 


Bear tud: 


^eortt H.R* 932, 5099, 5336 mad Ribieoft 
May 17 before louse Bubeorawlttee 


Rlblcoff*s Testiaony 


f! fiiawnn4f*arHfiHit mwi PoUNSr 

—- -.■•SSBJJgyjEggg'E- «» 


Ifrrwy note of thanks you get is probably the preface to another request for 
help—Just like this one! I'm en c losing copies of c arr esp oudanoe with the 
nat i o n al Association of Educational Broadcasters headquarters staff In 
W ashi ngton! ay letter of May Sk and Harold mil's latter of June 1. 

Xou will note ay point! that the stations which hare not succeeded la getting 
into operation would receive up to $125,000 in Hatching grants, and those 
now in operation receive nothing—even though their equlpaant is substandard 
and ready tar the scrap heap. 

Ihere are two faulty assumptions operative* 1., that being on broadcast is 
proof of adequate equipment and adequate funds for operation, and 2., that 
not being in operation Is proof at financial inability to get into operation, 
neither assumption is necessarily true. What is true hare in Toledo, how¬ 
ever, Is that we ere in operation with equlpaant that is sub-standard for 
broadcast both because of its age and its make. We don't even hove high 
grade baling wire to hold things together. And the damnable thing about it 
la that we do have the production talent and the trained broadcasters to do 
• bang-up J<*. Xf Harold BUI is right, that "all matching funds would hove 
to be new funds" with "no credit...for aapeadltwes already made"—and he's 


usually right—we are being penalised 


for our iaventii 


end resourceful- 


Since tbs final legislation hasn’t been written, perhaps you would he able 
to re-shape It to our local Interests and to those at the Betlenel Association 
of Educational Broadcasters. The KttB'e Washington office la located in the 
DuPont Circle Office Building, 13**6 Connecticut Avenue, end Harold Bill, 
Administrative Vice-President, or Will Isa Harley, president, would gladly 
fill you la with the background. 


Sincerely, 








SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD 


130 SIXTH STREET, 1ST. W. ■ ATLATTTA 13, OEOROXA. • TRINITY 5-3311 


June 13, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Administrative Vice President 
National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 
DuPont Circle Office Building 
13^6 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 


Dear Harold: 


Thank you for your informative and helpful letter of June 2 
concerning the educational television hills. We will want to 
write to the Southern members of the House Rules Committee. 


With personal regards and best wishes, I am 


Sincerely yours, 

William L. Bowden 
Regional Programs Associate 


WLB:jt 

R 

NA£ -• * 


' vi v - Q 

i_. OQl ARTERS 


1 5 1961 


f * 



i 



, uM'* 

Mississippi State University 


State College, Mississippi 


School of Abts and Sciences 
Office of the Associate Dean 
for Liberal Arts 


June 13, 1961 


The Honorable William Colmer, M C. 

House of Representatives 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Hr, Colmer: 

It has come to our attention that legislation for federal aid to educational tele¬ 
vision is now being drafted by the Department of Health Education and Welfare as 
a result of favorable hearings before the House Subcommittee on Communication and 
Power. Since any proposed measure will be reviewed and acted upon by the House 
Rules Committee, of which you are a member, we have felt that we should bring to 
your attention developments in the ETV area now under way in Mississippi, particu¬ 
larly since we at Mississippi State University have a vital interest In this 
matter. 

At the outset, may 1 point out that the concern of Mississippi State University 
with ETV derives from the fact that we have channel 2, the only educational alloca¬ 
tion on the VHP band In Mississippi, naturally, this channel is much desired by 
commercial broadcasters and to date we have managed successfully to stave off all 
attempts to have the F.C.C. turn the channel over for commercial uses. However, we 
are now in the position of having to do something ourselves toward the activation 
of channel 2 or give up the whole idea. 

In view of our unique situation channel-wise. President D. W. Colvsrd has felt that 
whatever is done with channel 2 should be on a state-wide basis, and should extend 
to the entire educational community, including the public schools. To this end, an 
ETV committee representing the five senior white state-supported institutions was set 
up by the Council of Presidents of the Board of Trustees, Institutions of Higher 
Learning* This committee has been added to by Superintendent J. M Tubb, who has 
appointed representatives from the junior college and public school areas. Thus, our 
planning for educational televlaion in Mississippi has become a cooperative operation 
and we envision a state-wide ETV network growing out of the activation of channel 2. 

It ia felt that ETV will be a great boon to our state in its efforts to meet its 
critical educational needs. Television will supplement the work of the classroom 
teacher and professor. It will particularly make possible the handling of larger 
clasaes, which are an absolute necessity in view of the current teacher shortage, 
which promises to get more severe as time passes. We are under no delusion that ETV 
will be a great money-saving economy. But in a state of modest financial resources 
such as ours is, we shall batter be able to handle our educational needs through the 
efficiency of television. In short, ETV will save us money we don* t have! 



Mr. Coiner 
Page 2 

June 13* 1961 


Naturally# Mississippi will need federal aid la its venture Into ETV, /Ithough the 
state legislature will naturally have to foot a part of the bill# the coat would be 
prohibitive were we left to our own financial resources. We shall need the maximum 
of the proposed matching funds. We urge you to exert your influence both in 
Washington and In Mississippi to see that the appropriate federal and state legls* 
latloa la passed. 

Thanking you for your good offices# 1 m 


Sincerely yours# 



Chairman 

State ETV Committee 


PJP 


ccs Dr. D. W. Colvard 


be: Mr. Harold E. Hill 








COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

BOX 911, HARRISBURG 



June I4 f 1961 


Mr 0 Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 

National Association of Educational Broadcasters 

DuPont Circle Office Building 

1346 Connecticut Avenue, N«W« 

Washington 6 f D. C. 



1 6 1961 

* M pi# 

7|8|9|10|U,12|1|2|3|4|5|? 


L 


Dear Mr. Hills 


You were most thoughtful to write me as you did on June 5» 
with respect to pending Legislation to provide Federal Aid to 
Educational Television. We are extremely interested in the pursuit 
of this matter and welcome the opportunity to assist and cooperate in 
any way we can. Please do not hesitate to be in touch with us regard¬ 
ing our helping in this matter. Our State Superintendent, Dr. Charles 
H. Boehm, shares in these expressions. 


Sincerely 


/ VW 


Neal V. Musmanno 
Deputy Superintendent 









June 16, 1961 


Mr. Harry D. Lamb 
Director, WTDS 
Radio-TV Education Dept. 
Toledo Public Schools 
1901 West Central 
Toledo 6, Ohio 

Dear Harry: 



I can understand your concern about the provisions of the Ribicoff 
approach. The new version of the Magnus on - Roberts bill, which 
has just been reported out by the Sucbommittee, and it ties in fairly 
closely with his recommendations. In particular, it lays special 
emphasis upon the use of these funds for activating the unused channels. 
On the other hand, it does not preclude the use of these funds for ex¬ 
panding or extending existing stations. If the state survey on the “need 
for and utility of additional educational television broadcasting 
facilities" indicates that a part of this development requires the im¬ 
provement of existing educational television facilities, such distri¬ 
bution of funds would be approved by the Commissioner. 

The pertinent language in the bill is as fbllows: “The Commissioner 
shall base his determination as to whether to approve applications for 
grants ... on criteiia set forth in regulations and designed to achieve 
(1) prompt and effective use of all educational television channels re¬ 
maining available, (2) equitable geographical distribution of educational 
television broadcasting facilities throughout the States, and (3) provision 
of educational television broadcasting facilities which will serve the 
greatest number of persons and serve them in as many areas as possible, 
and which are adaptable to the broadest educational uses." 


Mr, Harry D. Lamb 


Page 2 


June 16, 1961 


In our judgement, a serious ommission in the new legislation is 
the failure to provide credit in the matching requirement for pre¬ 
vious expenditures for educational television facilities. As you 
say, this is the kind of thing that rewards the laggards who have 
never done anything up tiU now in ETV and penalizes those who have 
already made a considerable effort and investment. We have hopes 
that this provision can be restored in conference along with an 
increase in the total amount of monies appropriated. 

Sincerely yours. 


William G. Harley 


WGH :rkf 


WTDS 


^ke 'fR.aDio ''Voice of the Toledo (Public Schools 


91.3-FM 



HARRY D. LAMB 


DOROTHY KELLOGG 


MILDRED COWELL 


DOROTHY MATHENY 


May afc, 1961 


RLv 


I-.* 

S 


NAL f-a.. i 


MAY 2 S 1961 


Mr. William Harley 
Mr. Harold ifif-m 



lOtllriSi 1 i«i 8i4| ; ft|6 


i 


The National Association at Educational Broadcasters 
131*6 Connecticut Ave. H.W. 

Washington 6, 3). C. 

Dear Bill and Harolds 

I’ve Just read the June issue of the Special Washington Report and 
I’m curious as to Aether a strict reSin^ bf Ribico^ 1 ©""raaaoendAtlan 
for $25 million was based on an average of $125,000 for each of the 
approximately 200 unactivated reserved channels" wouldn’t deprive all 
activated channels of any aid. 

WGTE is activated, but we certainly need much more than $125,000 to 
bring us up to full power and up to proper broadcast standards. Would 
we be ineligible for a grant! Certainly there are other operating 
stations who face the same problems: equipment sub-standard, insufficient 
in depth, and needing funds beyond local sources. If this formula is 
merely a means for estimating needs and not a pattern for distribution, 

I can accept It. Otherwise, not. It rewards the laggards who can 
afford the cost and penalises those Who with considerable effort have 
just managed to get into broadcast. 


Sincerely, 



HDL/jb 








87th CONGKESS 
1st Session 


S. 2109 




IN THE SENATE 0E THE UNITED STATES 

June 20,1961 

Mr. Magnuson (by request) introduced the following bill; which was read 
twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce 


A BILL 

To amend the Communications Act of 1934 in order to give the 
Eederal Communications Commission certain regulatory au¬ 
thority over television receiving apparatus. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bepresenta- 

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled 

3 That section 303 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 

4 U.S.C. 303) is amended by inserting at the end thereof the 

5 following: 

6 “( S ) Have authority, whenever the objectives of this 

7 Act so require, to prescribe minimum performance capa- 

8 bilities for apparatus designed to receive television pictures 

9 broadcast simultaneously with sound, when such apparatus 
10 is traded or shipped in interstate commerce, or is imported 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 


2 


from any foreign country into the United States, for sale or 
resale to the public.” 

Sec. 2. Part 1 of title III of the Communications Act of 
1934 is amended by inserting at the end thereof a new sec¬ 
tion as follows: 

“Sec. 330. No person shall trade or ship in interstate 
commerce, or import from any foreign country into the 
United States, for sale or resale to the public, apparatus 
described in subsection 303 (s) unless it complies with mini¬ 
mum performance capabilities prescribed by the Commission 
pursuant to section 303 (s) : Provided, That this section shall 
not apply to carriers transporting such apparatus without 
trading in it.” 


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June 27, 1961 


The Honorable Thomas Dodd 
The United States Senate 
Washington 25, D.C. 

Dear Senator Dodd: 

In carrying on your Investigation of the impact of television on juvenile 
delinquency, I wonder if your attention has been directed to an impor¬ 
tant research work entitled "Television and the Child" by Himmelwelt, 
Oppenheim, and Vince. This series of social-psychological studies of 
the influence of television on children is regarded by many as the most 
authoritative and responsible research in this area. 

Although the studies were conducted in England, they have a great per¬ 
tinency to our own country . They show, among other things, the effect 
of television on childrens* outlook and the impact upon them of westerns 
and crime and detective series. 

The entire book is available from the Oxford University Press, but a re¬ 
print of the first four chapters can be obtained from the Television Infor¬ 
mation Office, 665 Fifth Avenue, New York 19, New York. 

You are probably well aware of this publication, but I thought I might 
mention it in case it might have escaped your notice • 

Sincerely yours 9 


William G. Harley 


WGH:rkf 


June 27, 1961 


Mr. Bernarr Cooper 
Department of Speech 
Florida State University 
Tallahassee, Florida 

Dear Bernarr: 

I have written to Senator Dodd regarding Television and the Child . In 
case it has escaped his notice, I trust that his staff will procure a copy 
of the book, or a reprint of it, in case they do not already have it in 
their collection. Senator Dodd seems to be sincere about his investi¬ 
gation, though as you know, these things are oftenput on for show or to 
gain notoriety. I sat in for a while the other afternoon when they were 
giving ABC's Trays a good going over. 

With reference to the speech association convention - I still don’t know 
for certain. However, the next couple of weeks should bring a definite 
decision. 

Cordially, 


William G. Harley 


WGHtrkf 



THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 

TALLAHASSEE 


DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 


June 13, 1961 


This is not meant as a chore, but wondered about wiring Sen. 
Dodd (investigating influence of TV on delinquency.) The 
TELEVISION DIGEST report on his investigation, Schramm*s 
and Garry's testimony is patent nonsense. No reference is 
made to Himmelweit, Vince and Oppenheim's investigation which 
is by far the most significant and contal ns the direct kinds 
of analysis which apparently neither Schramm nor Garry have 
yet given. See "Effect of Television Values and Outlook," 
p. 17 and "The effect of Westerns, and of Crime aid Detective 
Series," p. 20, and subsequent references. These appear in 
TELEVISION AND THE CHILD, long regarded by child, educational 
and general, psychologists as one of the most significant pieces 
of research done to date. The work has long had the blessing 
of Dr. Eleanor Maccoby of Stanford, a recognized international 
authority in the field. I am sure you have the reprint of the 
first four chapters of this work (ava lable from the TIO Office) 
if not the entire work. Will be pleased to loan you either 


or both. The taxpayers could save a whale of a lot of money on 
this investigation if only Sen. Dodd or some member of his staff 
would take the time to consult someone who knows and is willing 
to give him the info contained. (I know it is too much to hope 
that a busy Senator will do his own reading.) 

Whew J 


There are days when I make myself positively obnoxious being a 
crusader and "caring” about ETV. But sinee WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN 
EDUCATION is planning to list me in their next edition, I shppose 
I must make "noises" like an educator. 


Kindest regards, 
Bernarr* Cooj® r 


copy sent to Bernarr Cooper 7/7/61 


ESTES KEFAUVER, TENN. 
OLIN D. JOHNSTON, S.C. 
JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, ARI 
SAM J. ERVIN, JR., N.C. 
JOHN A. CARROLL, COLO. 
THOMAS J. DODD, CONN. 
PHILIP A. HART, MICH. 


JAMES 0. EASTLAND, MISS., CHAIRMAN 

ALEXANDER WILEY, WIS. 

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, ILL. 
ROMAN L. HRUSKA, NEBR. 

KENNETH B. KEATING, N.Y. 


NORRIS COTTON, N.H. 



SUBCOMMITTEE: 

THOMAS J. DODD, CONN., CHAIRMAN 
J. ERVIN, JR., N.C. ALEXANDER WILEY, WIS. 

ESTES KEFAUVER, TENN. ROMAN L. HRUSKA, NEBR. 

NORRIS COTTON, N.H. 


l. CARROLL, COLO. 


CARL L. PERIAN, STAFF DIRECTOR 


QICnMcb Senate 


COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY 
SUBCOMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 
(PURSUANT TO S. RES. 48, 87TH CONGRESS) 


July 3, 1961 


RE 

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HEADQUAR- 


CD 

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Mr. William G. Harley 
National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 
Suite 1119 

DuPont Circle Office Building 
13^6 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 



Dear Mr. Harley: 

Thank you for your letter calling my attention to 
the research work entitled "Television and the Child." 


1961 

P!K 

i ?J ?! 4/ 


Although we knew of this work and the subcommittee 
staff used it in preparing for our recent hearings, I 
appreciate your thoughtfulness in writing to me about 
it. 


With kind regards, I am 


Sincerely yours, 

THOMAS DODD 
Chairman 


TJD:m 


87th CONGRESS 
1st Session 


%> 

/♦ y A %- 




H. R. 8031 


% 


f /& 




*/ 9 , 


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

July 10,1961 

Mr. Harris introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Com¬ 
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce 


A BILL 

To amend the Communications Act of 1984 in order to give 
the Federal Communications Commission certain regula- 
' tory authority over television receiving apparatus. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bepresenta- 

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled , 

3 That section 308 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 

4 U.S.C. 303) is amended by inserting at the end thereof the 

5 following : 

6 “(s) Have authority, whenever the objectives of this 

7 Act so require, to prescribe minimum performance capabili- 

8 ties for apparatus designed to receive television pictures 

9 broadcast simultaneously with sound, when such apparatus 
I® is traded or shipped in interstate commerce, or is imported 

I 




1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 


2 


from any foreign country into the United States, for sale or 
resale to the public.” 

Sec. 2. Part 1 of title III of the Communications Act of 
1934 is amended by inserting at the end thereof a new sec¬ 
tion as follows: 

“tearing in appaeatus desceibed IN SECTION 3 0 3 (S) 

“Sec. 330. No person shall trade or ship in interstate 
commerce, or import from any foreign country into the 
United States, for sale or resale to the public, apparatus de¬ 
scribed in paragraph (s) of section 303 unless it complies 
with minimum performance capabilities prescribed by the 
Commission pursuant to that paragraph: Provided, That this 
section shall not apply to carriers transporting such apparatus 
without trading in it.” 


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A PROPOSED PLAN FOR EDUCATIONAL TV IN KENTUCKY 


1 

I 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION 

of the 

LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION 




i 

V 


Frankfort, Kentucky 
July 14, 1961 


INTRODUCTION 

At the request of the Legislative Research 
Commission's Advisory Committee on Educational 
Television, a possible plan for a statewide educational 
television network was prepared in March, 1961. Some 
work had been done toward developing the basic out¬ 
line such a network might take even before the com¬ 
mittee's request. Since March additional study has 
been carried out to refine further the data in the engi¬ 
neering field. The engineering data concerning ex¬ 
pected coverages and channel location are felt to be 
sound. 


Producing educational television is a com¬ 
plex operation. It partakes of the education, engi¬ 
neering, and administrative worlds. Some idea of 
this complexity can be gained from the outline on the 
following page which lists functions necessary in ed¬ 
ucational television. 


i 






Functions Necessary in ETV 


Operating Capital Outlay 

Production facilities 

A. Studio buildings 

B. Studios 

C. Studio equipment 
Transmitting facilities 

A. Local 

B. Inter-city & inter-institutional 
Recording-reproducing facilities 

Classroom use facilities 


Operating Expense 

Maintenance of facilitie s 

A. Production facilities 

B. Transmitting facilities 

a. Local 

b. Inter-city & inter-institutional 

C. Recording facilities 

D. Storage, scheduling & distribution of recordings 
Planning of TV courses 

Time & travel of classroom teachers involved 

Time of TV instructor & aides 

Time of producers, directors 

Time of engineer and other technicians 

Visual aids, art work, ’'props”, etc. 

Printing of lesson guides, other materials 
Video tape for recording 
Production of TV courses and Programs 

(Same as above- PLUS) 

Cost of operating production facilities 
Cost of operating transmitting facilities 
Cost of operating receiving facilities 
Subscription for ETV & Radio Center recordings 
Administration 

Network & inter-institutional co-ordination 
Registration 

Distribution of lesson guides, other communications 
Time of instructors for on-campus conferences 
Examinations, grading tests, etc. 

Granting of credit 


ii 













I. THE PLAN 


Synopsis of Proposed Network for Kentucky 

This network proposal is based on several assumptions. The 
most significant assumption holds that any state effort in educational tele¬ 
vision should provide service to the greatest possible number of Ken¬ 
tuckians. The second assumption is that flexibility in operation be pro¬ 
vided so that a variety of needs can be served. Also assumed is inter¬ 
connection of the transmitters by microwave radio relay. 

The first assumption is least open to question since general 
tax revenues would be expended on a State-sponsored ETY system. The 
second assumption* raises the cost of the proposed network, since savings 
in buildings and production equipment would be possible were Lexington 
and Louisville made the only programming enters. Also, if single di¬ 
rection transmission along the network of only one program at a time were 
desired, microwave network costs could be significantly reduced. The 
type of microwave interconnection set forth here meets the criterion of 
flexibility and with small additions makes possible significant contribution 
by the system to higher, education in Kentucky. 

The assumption of microwave interconnection is made so that 
descriptions of operations and cost estimates can be made. Other methods 
of interconnection should be studied carefully by qualified persons before 
a final decision is made on the actual system (whether microwave, video¬ 
tape, or other). The system described here, however, should work and 
should be reliable. It is designed to provide service to the University 
centers as well as the public schools. It is suitable for providing dual 
channel open circuit telecasting should this be desired in the future. 

Experience of UHF stations in Lexington shows that a radius 
of 45 miles of good coverage is possible, especially if sufficient tower 
height is provided. Such a radius is assumed for the Madisonville, Somer¬ 
set, and Lexington transmitters. Murray, Bowling Green, Morehead, 
Louisville, Pikeville, and Hazard are assumed to reach 40 miles; Ash¬ 
land and Covington are assumed to reach from 25 to 30 miles. At least 
90 percent of Kentucky’s population would be covered. 




Eastern Kentucky 


No programming facilities are planned for Eastern Kentucky 
during the early years. A two-track microwave system leading East out 
of Lexington would probably branch somewhere around Campton. Channels 
used in Eastern Kentucky are: 

19 near Hazard 

24 near Morehead 

14 at Pikeville 

59 in Ashland 

The twp-track microwave extends all the way into Ashland to 
serve the University Center as well as the transmitter. One track in the 
Southeast terminates at Hazard; the other extends to Cumberland to serve 
the Center. Only a single track extends from Campton to Pikeville. 

Northern Kentucky 

Channel 54, presently assigned to Cincinnati,can almost certain¬ 
ly be moved to Covington., Located there it can serve the Northern Ken¬ 
tucky area. The microwave facilities necessary to carry the signal to the 
channel 54 transmitter can be made two-track at low cost and provide 
service to the Covington Center of the University. 

Central Kentucky 

Productions from Louisville, Bowling Green, Murray, and any 
possible additional studio facilities can be fed into the network for state¬ 
wide distribution. The main network studio,, however, will be located at 
Lexington. The FCC is considering a petition to "drop in" channel 46 in 
Lexington. Apparently the request will be favorably received. 

Lexington will be, during the first years, the programming cen¬ 
ter for the Eastern Kentucky region. The main network control board 
will also be there. Videotaping equipment should also be present. 

Other channels used and their relationship to Lexington would 
be 29 in Somerset and 15 which is presently operating in Louisville. In¬ 
creases in power and tower height would enable effective coverage of a 
much larger area around Louisville than at present. 


- 2 - 






A two-track microwave system leads out of Lexington to the 
East, North, and West; a single track spur leads South to Somerset. Both 
tracks lead outward from Lexington to the North and East; one of the two 
tracks leading to Louisville and West will be reversible in direction. 

The Elizabethtown Center taps off the main microwave route for its pro¬ 
gramming. 

Western Kentucky 

Channel 17 at Bowling Green will be connected to a studio locatefl 
on the Western State campus which will provide local programs and some 
network programs. Channel 26 at Madisonville will provide service to 
Owensboro, Henderson, and Hopkinsville, It will be a non-programming 
location. A studio is to be established at Murray State College; channel 
33 located nearby will cover the Purchase area and some territory im¬ 
mediately to the East. The two-track microwave network will terminate 
at the transmitter for channel 33. 

Capital Construction Costs for a Network 

An effort fyas been made to estimate the cost of the physical 
facilities of a network. The estimate is based on opinions of persons en¬ 
gaged in television operations and analysis of plans and studies for other 
systems having some similarities. Many factors can raise costs for a 
network above the level that engineers or operating personnel might con¬ 
sider "normal," For example, the cost of a transmitter can varyby tens 
of thousands of dollars, depending upon the power output needed for a 
specified coverage. The availability of a good site for a transmitter can 
only be determined "on the spot. " A major cost that might arise is the 
building of roads to transmitter and microwave relay sites where the best 
location for coverage purposes might be the worst from the standpoint of 
accessibility. A hilltop tract might have to be cleared and leveled. 

With these types of problems in mind, estimated costs for a 
system are presented. 

The Basic System 

Transmitters, UHF, 600KW effective ra/diated 
power, 1000 foot tower, necessary related equip¬ 
ment, and structure to house equipment. 3(Lex¬ 
ington, Somerset, Madisonville) @$400, 000 $1,200, 000 


- 3 - 







Transmitters, UHF, 300KW effective radiated 
power, 500 foot tower, necessary related equip¬ 
ment, and structure to house equipment. 


5 (Hazard, Pikeville, Morehead, Murray, 

Bowling Green) @ $300,000 

$1,500,000 

Transmitters, UHF, 100KW effective radiated 
power, 300 foot tower, necessary related equip¬ 
ment, and structure to house equipment. 

2 (Ashland, Covington) @ $150,000 

300,000 


Microwave System 


Towers, 300 foot, guyed, lighted. 

22 @ $13,000 

286,000 

Receiver-transmitters. 50 @$10,000 

500,000 

Necessary additional equipment 

300,000 

Buildings and auxiliary generators 

200,000 


Studio Equipment and Buildings 


Lexington 

Bowling Green 

Murray 

550,000 

200,000 

200,000 

System Test Equipment 

40,000 

Kentuckiana ETV Council (Louisville) for improve¬ 
ment of facilities 

100,000 

Sub Total 

$5, 376,000 


Desirable Additions 


Production center at Richmond with microwave 
link to Lexington 

Production center at Morehead 

Remote field equipment 

Closed circuit systems 4 @ $60, 000 

120,000 

80,000 

75,000 

240,000 

Sub Total 

$ 515,000 

GRAND TOTAL 

$5,891,000 


- 4 - 





Operating Cost 


Rough calculations have been made of operating co sts for the 
network when it is in full operation. These figures are, if anything, more 
tentative than the capital cost estimates. They will serve, however, to 
indicate generally the funds that the General Assembly would be asked to 
provide annually. 


Operation at Murray $ 150,000 

Operation at Bowling Green 150,000 

Operation at Lexington 350, 000 

Operation at Louisville 50, 000 

Operation at remaining transmitters 

7 @ $50,000 350,000 

Operation of microwave system 150, 000 

Network administration 200, 600 


$1,400,000 

Possible Development Schedule 

1961 


Summer 1. Petition FCC for reservation of necessary channels. 

2. Engineering survey to determ|ne precise microwave and 
transmitter sites. 

3. Legal search on titles of likely sites. 

Fall 1. Develop concrete plan and detailed cost estimates for inclu¬ 

sion in Executive Budget and presentation to General Assembly. 

2. Develop final specifications for equipment. 

3. Begin educational campaign. 

1962 

Spring 1. General Assembly considers desirability of ETV network. 

A. Passes organic act. 

B. Appropriates funds. 

2. Appoint commission to direct ETV network. 

3. Employ executive director, chief engineer, and educational 
director along with necessary^ supporting staff. 

4. Obtain construction permits from FCC. 


Summer 1. Begin construction of main studio at Lexington. 

2. Construct Lexington and Eastern Kentucky transmitters and 
microwave links. 

3. Employ necessary studio and engineering people for above units. 


-5 - 






Fall 

1. Construct microwave link between Louisville and Lexington. 

2. Begin construction of remaining transmitters and microwave 
links. 

1963 

Spring 

1. Develop program schedule for fall. Employ director of 

utilization. , 

2. Select television teachers for work out of Lexington. 

3. Begin experimental and testing operation of Lexingtoq studio, 
and first transmitters along with existing microwave links. 

4. Employ basic personnel for Bowling Green and Murray 
studios and for operation of transmitters there. 

5. Purchase equipment and begin closed circuit, experimental 
production at Bowling Green and Murray. 

6. Test reception in Eastern Kentucky and develop methods for 
coverage. 

Summer 

Begin testing of western part of the system. 

Fall 

Begin full network transmission, using only programming 
from Louisville and Lexington. 

1964 

Spring 

1. Complete originating facilities at Bowling Green and Murray. 

2. Develop regional program plans. 

3. Select regional teachers and begin course preparations. 

Fall 

1. All basic facilities in operation. 

2. Develop originating facility at Richmond if need appears. 


Channel Reservation 
- ———, * 

At present the Federal Communications Commission has re- 


served only one channel for educational use in Kentucky. This is channel 15, 
presently in use as WFPK in Louisville ^Jefferson County. As an early 
step toward establishing a statewide ETY network, the FCC should be 
petitioned to reserve channels for educational use among those allotted to 
the state foT commercial use but presently unused. Good channels are avail¬ 
able in most places in Kentucky where transmitters are to be located. Reser 
vation should not be especially difficult. Few or none of the channels to be 
requested are likely to be taken up for commercial use in the near future:. 
Most are located in towns too small to support such relatively expensive 
undertakings. 


- 6 - 



Shifting of channels from the towns to which they are allocated 
is possible., Such shifting can only be accomplished upon the basis of a 
detailed engineering study. Following is a list of channels which should 
be reserved whenever the proper State officials feel that development of 
a statewide ETV network is likely in Kentucky. Only the shift of channel 24 
from Maysville to Morehead requires an FCC order. Channel 54 can be 
used in Covington although it is assigned to Cincinnati. 

Location Channel Number 


Ashland 59 

Bowling Green 17 

Covington 54 

Hazard 19 

Madisonville 26 

Maysville (shift to Morehead) 24 

Murray 33 

Pikeville 14 

Somerset 29 


Except for channels 59 in Ashland and 54 in Covington, the 
channels suggested for reservation have low numbers. A rule of thumb is 
that the lower the number, the better the channel. 

The FCC must be requested, through a ’’Petition for Rule Making,” 
to make the ETV reservations. The request should include an appeal for 
shifting of channel 24. A report by a licensed engineer must be included in¬ 
dicating that the shift is technically feasible and complies with FCG regula¬ 
tions concerning channel spacing. The petition should be made by some 
official (such as the Governor or the Superintendent of Public Instruction) 
or government agency (such as the Legislative Research Commission) or 
combination of the two, and should point out that the General Assembly can 
not proceed to act on ETV unless channels are available. 


- 7 - 



II. (SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS IN PLANNING 
THE NETWORK 


Any large-scale use of educational television in Kentucky will 
operate with the objective of as near state-wide coverage as possible. 
Economy in operation and construction is also necessary. Facilities for 
producing telecasts must have their location dictated by availability of 
teaching talent and other educational resources. Priorities are needed 
because the whole network can not be built at once. 

The following sections are designed to give the reasoning behind 
certain portions of the plan. In addition, some ideas are presented about 
special problems and areas in which policy decisions eventually will 
probably have to be made. 


Location of Originating Facilities 

Originating facilities are places where TV programs can be 
produced. Building one near every transmitter is too expensive, but they 
are not tqoi expensive to make from three to six feasible. Two basic factors 
should determine the placement of originating facilities. These are avail¬ 
able educational resources and area needs. Location in relation to a trans¬ 
mitter is of some importance, but generally if the distance; between, the 
two is twenty miles or less, a link can be provided at relatively low cost. 
Location in the state is important with regapd to ease of access for school 
people. Following are suggested locations for originating facilities. Some 
attention is given to timing of entrance into actual production for network 
or regional consumption. 

Lexington 


The University of Kentucky is located in Lexingtoi>. Within a 
radius of about thirty miles are four major private colleges,' Centre, 
Georgetown, Berea, and Transylvania, The University has the greatest 
diversity of specialised talent, library and equipment resources, and 
course offerings of any state-supported institution in Kentucky. In addi¬ 
tion, Lexington is a hub for major highways. 

The most extensive originating facility probably should be 
located in Lexington, It might be on the University campus, but this is 
not a necessity. The probable need to use students as helpers in the 
studios makes location on or near the campus desirable, however. 


8 




Lexingtoh is not quite central in the State, but it is close enough 
to being so that the central network controls should also be located there. 
Lexington can serve as the regional programming center for Eastern Ken¬ 
tucky as well as for the Bluegrass until such time as secondary originating 
facilities are built at Morehead, Richmond, or both. 

Bowling Green 

Western Kentucky State College is the second-largest state- 
supported higher education institution in the Commonwealth. It is located 
in one of the larger, growing cities of central-western Kentucky, Because 
of its teacher-training emphasis, Western is well suited to be a source of 
in-school programs. 

The originating facility at Bowling Green need not be as exten¬ 
sive as that at Lexington. To assure that a minimum of necessary experi¬ 
ence in ETV programming exists when the studio goes "on the air, " a video 
tape recorder and a closed circuit TV system should be installed on the 
Western State campus at the same time the Lexington facility begins to 
telecast. After a year of practice, during which some productions would 
have been taped for network showing and experience gained over closed 
circuit, the facility should be brought into the network programming. The 
closed circuit installation would continue to serve the needs of the campus 
and allow full use of cameras and other studio equipment. 

Murray 

Murray is located in the Purchase area and can serve far- 
western Kentucky. Although somewhat smaller than Western State, Murray 
State College provides many of the same educational resources that justify 
a production facility in Bowling Green. Murray also should be enabled to 
practice for a year before entering into the network. This could be done by 
means of a closed circuit system developing simultaneously with the similar 
process at Bowling Green. 

Richmond 


Eastern Kentucky State College is located in Richmond, The 
situation is somewhat different than with Murray and Bowling Green, for 
Richmond is within the expected coverage of a station located near 
Lexingtoni, Probably, no extensive programming should-be planned for 
several years at Richmond. Eastern probably will eventually serve as an 
originating facility for programs designed for Eastern Kentucky, Programs 
could be taped in Richmond or a microwave link to the network center in 
Lexington could be provided. Easterns educational resources appear to 
be similar in quality and quantity to those of the other state colleges. 

Closed circuit TV would be useful for the campus. 


- 9 - 





Louisville 


When the first station of the network is ready to begin telecast¬ 
ings, Jefferson County and Louisville public schools will have had at least 
six years of ETV experience. The Louisville metropolitan area is large 
enough and has enough educational resources to continue its relative self- 
sufficiency of ETV production. Both the State network and the Jefferson 
County effort can be aided, however, by bringing the two into some kind 
of close working relationship. 

A relatively modest investment of about one-half of the cost 
of the originating facility and transmitter at Bowling Green or Murray 
should enable WFPK in Louisville to increase its coverage significantly 
and to acquire the equipment and space necessary to upgrade further the 
quality of programming. Jefferson County should be linked into the micro- 
wave system early in the network's development. The network could have 
the benefit of Jefferson County’s experience and resources; Jefferson 
County could be relieved of some of the burden of program effort and cost. 

Mo re he ad 

Technical problems, population shifts, and other factors sug¬ 
gest that an originating facility at Morehead probably should not be built 
sooner than from three to five years after development of the network 
begins. Were adequate means of transportation available, Morehead would 
be a natural place for development of regional programming for Eastern 
KentuckyAt present, however, Richmond or even Lexington can be 
reached more easily from most of Eastern Kentucky than can Morehead, 

The resources of the State College and of the nearby school 
teachers there should be utilized as well as possible, but, outside of the 
Ashland area, the region does not seem to have the growth potential of 
other areas that will have originating facilities earlier. 


The Microwave System 

A microwave system uses radio signals of frequencies that can 
not be received in house radios. It is a series of very specialized trans¬ 
mitters and receivers that send and receive a beam almost like that of a 
flash light. A signal is sent out from the first tower in the system; the 
signal is received on a tower from 20 to 40 miles away. The signal is 
given a boost in power and sent on to the next tower. At the end of the line 
the signal can be changed back into what it was at the other end of the line. 


-10 - 





A microwave system built primarily to interconnect a state ETV 
network might have other valuable uses. The Kentucky State Police have 
recently had completed for them a study of a possible microwave network 
over the state. They envisioned a system whereby government agencies 
other than their own could make use of it for necessary communications. 

. Consideration should be given to building any microwave system 

for ETV in such a fashion that it can be adapted to multiple uses. For a 
small additional cost, the system described here can be extended and its 
equipment designed so that it could link the University campus with the^ 
centers. This possibility depends, however, upon the design of the basic 
system for the regular network. 

Except for the antenna system, the equipment at a microwave 
tower can carry a signal in only one direction at a time. In order to have 
simultaneous two-way transmission, the sending and receiving equipment 
at each microwave installation must be duplicated. Unless all programming 
for the network that is done at Bowling Green, Murray, and Louisville is 
to be put on video tape and shipped to Lexington for showing from there, a 
two-way microwave installation is advisable. At relatively low cost, one 
receiving-^ ending system at each'piicrowave installation-can be equipped 
with a "switcher.' 1 This is a mechanical device that, upoti a signal from the 
central network controls, changes one receiving-sending system so that 
the part that formerly received from the East now transmits to the East and 
the one that formerly transmitted to the West now receives from the West. 
After this switch is made all down the line, transmission of two signals in 
the same direction is possible. 

With the system operating in two directions, «a program for 
sixth-grade geography might be going out along the network from Lexington; 
the studio at Murray could at the same time be transmitting a program to 
Lexington for tape recording. If the set of microwave equipment trans¬ 
mitting into Lexington is later switched, two programs can be sent out from 
Lexington-simultaneously. A course in college physics might thus be 
beamed out to the University centers from Lexington at the same time that 
an elementary school program is going out to the network transmitters. 

A two-way microwave system is suggested ta embrace Louis¬ 
ville, Lexington, and the network West from Lexington. At such time as 
an originating facility is developed at Morehead, a two-way system would 
be necessary between that installation and Lexington. A double track 
(without switching equipment) leading from near Campton toward Hazard 
would not be excessively expensive. 


- 11 - 


This type of network would immediately allow transmission to the Cumber¬ 
land and Ashland centers as well as public school programming. 

All existing University centers probably can be reached from 
proposed end-points of the microwave interconnection without the construc¬ 
tion of any intermediate relay stations. It should be a "one-hop" link from 
Madisonville to Henderson, and from Hazard to Cumberland. 

The interconnecting system for the regular network can be 
modified and extended to take in the centers as described above for an 
additional cost of around $200, 000. The cost of equipping the centers with 
closed circuit systems so that they can use the programs should be quite 
low. 


Special Considerations 

Closed Circuit Systems 

In the schedule of construction and operation Set out above, 
mention is made of installing closed circuit TV systems on the campuses 
of Western and Murray State Colleges. These systems would serve as 
practice systems prior to actual network and local programming at these 
locations. If the state icolleges continue to grow at their present rates, 
they will experience difficulty in acquiring sufficient additional high quality 
faculty. Closed circuit TV is adaptable to a variety of uses on college 
campuses, such as increasing the number of students who can be reached 
by a single instructor. Installation of such systems seems advisable for 
each of the colleges. Accordingly an item is included in the cost esti¬ 
mates to provide for closed circuit systems. The University's unique 
position makes strictly on-campus TV there desirable at present. Due 
to the heavy burden that the network will place upon available personnel, 
as well as the relatively slow growth of the University, closed circuit TV 
would be perhaps more useful as a training device for TV personnel than 
for instructional benefits. Financing of the system has not been provided 
for, however. 

Repeater-transmitters 

The rough terrain of Eastern Kentucky will cause difficulties 
in reception that can be fully overcome only at very high cost. The first 
consideration must be to "cover the ridgetops" with a strong signal. 

Most towns are in valleys there. Many have community antennas. In the 
case of some of the larger population concentrations, small, low power 
transmitters (usually called repeaters) imay provide coverage at low cost. 
Such installations would pick up the signals of the main transmitters at the 
ridgetops and, by means of a directionalized signal, cover the town 
involved. 


- 12 - 






The decision to install these repeaters should not be made 
until the main transmitters are in operation and their actual coverage has 
been closely analyzed. Assuming that the repeater type of equipment will 
turn out to be useful for filling in dead spots, they can be purchased as 
experience shows the need for them. Local funds might well be used to 
provide them. 

Dual Channel Operation 

Because of the normal six-hour length of the school day, a 
maximum of 12 thirty-minute in-school telecasts per day is possible. 

This amounts to one per grade level for the public schools. If ETY is to 
have maximum impact on educational quality, an hour per day probably 
should be available for students in the fourth through twelfth grades. This 
would require nine hours of programming or 50 percent more than are 
available from a single channel. Twenty-minute daily programs for the 
three primary grades would demand another hour per day, making a total 
of ten hours. 

To provide ten hours of telecasting per school day would 
require simultaneous use of two broadcast channels covering a specified 
area. An alternative method would be the use of closed circuit trans¬ 
mission that would allow simultaneous use of several channels. Cable 
is very expensive* however, and its range is limited. Kentucky's school 
population is relatively .widely dispersed. Operation of two channels 
probably would give coverage at a cost lower than closed circuit cable. 

Lack of sufficient ETV experience in Kentucky dictates that 
the two-channel system not begin until several years of operating experi¬ 
ence in the statewide network have been gained. Expansion to dual channel 
operation would be cheaper than setting up the basic system since few new 
cameras, studios, lighting systems, etc. , would be necessary. 

Common Carrier Microwave Facilities 


Although Kentucky would almost certainly have to construct, 
own, and maintain-transmitter facilities, such is not the case with micro- 
wave interconnecting facilities. Lease of common carrier microwave 
facilities is one alternative to owning such facilities. Another alternative 
is to contract with a private company for construction and operation of the 
facilities without being bound by common carrier rates or restrictions. 

At such time as the location of transmitters is decided, bids or estimates 
should be taken from common carrier operating companies that will give 
a basis for deciding whether to own or to lease microwave facilities. 


- 13 - 




III. ADMINISTRATION FOR IMPLEMENTING THE PLAN 


Provision of facilities for ETV, although the most expensive 
part of any ETV system is not necessarily the deciding factor in the quality 
of the product that is sent into the schools. People can not merely be 
"turned loose" with the equipment and expected to do a proper job. 

Because of the amount of State money that would go into such 
a system as outlined in this report, control at the State level of the oper¬ 
ations seems both logical and inevitable. Properly developed, the mech¬ 
anism established for control and operation of the network can maintain 
the political integrity of the network as well as provide for programming 
that meets some of the pressing needs of education in Kentucky. This is 
not the whole story, however. The programs that are telecast are no 
more effective than their use in the classrooms and in the home. Concern 
for proper utilization of telecasts should result in a very high ratio in 
returns in educational value to dollars spent. 


Administrative Organization 


ETV Commission 


A commission-type of governing body at the head of an 
independent state ETV agency seems advisable. An ETV network would 
have uses far broader than the responsibility of any existing state depart¬ 
ment. In-school programming at the elementary and secondary levels, 
adult education for persons not enrolled in schools, uses at and beyond the 
college level, and general cultural programming are all possible with such 
a network. Generally accepted in administration is the fact that a new 
extensive program frequently will require flexibility of operation that it 
might not have if placed within an existing agency to compete there for 
executive attention,, budget, and internal services. The basic reason for 
independence, however, remains the bVeadth of possible uses for ETV. 

Agencies and institutions responsible for the narrower aspects 
of education that are noted above must be brought into the administrative 
process. How this may be done will be pointed out subsequently. The 
commission itself should be an instrument of public policy and should be 
free from domination by persons who make their living as educators but 
should be very receptive to their special knowledge. The commission 
should set forth broad guidelines both as to the utilization and development 
of the physical facilities and as to the needs which should be met through 
programs televisedv The? commission should be able to contract, sue, hire, 
etc., as a body corporate. Its main function would remain that of general 
policy direction. It would be responsible for facilities and for program¬ 
ming but should operate more along the lines of the State Board of Educa¬ 
tion than of an ordinary administering board. 


14 




General Manager 


Boards or commissions are not suitable instruments for day-to- 
day administration. They usually operate through a single executive. A 
general manager or executive director should have the responsibility for 
details of continuing administrations, subject to the over-riding power of 
the commission. The position of general manager requires an adminis¬ 
trator rather than ah expert in either television or education, although he 
must believe deeply in the value of ETV. This person would have to deal 
with experts in television and education as well as with other state agencies 
and his own commission. , He must be a person of considerable ability. An 
acquaintance with educational television and some experience with education 
are quite desirable but may not need to be the determining considerations. 

Chief Engineer 

Working directly under the authority of the general manager 
should be a chief engineer who would provide the basic technical know¬ 
ledge necessary for planning. The chief engineer would be in over-all 
charge of the engineering function at production, transmitting, and inter¬ 
connecting facilities. He would be the expert who would prepare or super¬ 
vise the preparation of technical engineering data for the use of the Kentucky 
ETV commission and of the Federal Communications Commission when 
the Kentucky commission had dealings with it. Although extensive engi¬ 
neering experience in commercial television work would be adequate for 
this man, experience in educational television work might be more valuable 
because rather significant variations may exist in approach to solution of 
engineering problems between educational and commercial television 
systems. i-,iJ 

Educational Director 


An educational expert should be employed who would be respon¬ 
sible for the educational programming of the network. Florida uses a 
"Task Force" made up of prominent educators which travels to the ETV 
production centers in that state, finds out what each of the relatively 
independent stations plans to produce, and then arranges for the video¬ 
taping of courses that appear to meet the most frequently expressed educa¬ 
tional needs of the state. The main weakness of this system is that it 
provides ofr no one person to whom dissatisfied people can look for changes. 
Responsibility is diffused. The task of programming should be a full-time 
job. 


In order to assure that personal or arbitrary considerations do not 
dictate the choice of programs to be telecast, the educational director should 
be required to consult with an advisory body made up of several recognized 
practitioners from each level of education. The Department of Education, 
the University, the State Colleges, elementary teachers, and secondary 
teachers should all be represented here. 


- 15 - 





Director of Utilization 


At an organizational and pay level equal to that of the Educa¬ 
tional Director should b£ employed a Director of Utilization. While the 
Educational Director would be concerned with programming and course 
development conferences, the Director of Utilization would have the respon¬ 
sibility for providing aid to teachers receiving ETV in their classrooms. 

He would also have the responsibility for directing and coordinating research 
concerned with adapting classroom situations to make the best possible use 
of ETV programs. Testing programs to evaluate various programming 
approaches should constitute an area of considerable importance to him. 


Subordinate Staff-General Considerations 

The basic personnel outlined above would constitute the admin¬ 
istrative nucleus of the network. The responsibilities assigned for central 
administration will determine what other professional and technical staff 
will be necessary. Operating upon certain assumptions, the following will 
indicate further requirements in major areas of operation. 

Engineering 


Transmitting facilities require a full-time qualified engineer to 
be on duty at all times during operation. In order to provide time for main¬ 
tenance operations (which are generally money-savers if carried on regu¬ 
larly), each transmitter should have on duty at all times two engineers, one 
chief and an assistant. Two engineers per facility will be sufficient during 
early stages of operation but when broadcasting exceeds eight hours per day, 
a third man probably should be available. Thus, during the first year of 
operation, two will be sufficient, but after that a third might be hired for 
each transmitter. Studios require engineers. Generally one engineer on 
duty is enough except where a video-tape recorder is used simultaneously 
with live programming. One engineer for each function is then necessary. 

If studies are used over a*span of more than eight hours, a second engineer 
becomes necessary. ' 

Microwave facilities require attention of engineers who can do 
regular maintenance and handle problems as they arise. Alabama's micro- 
wave network presently takes the time of one microwave supervisor and two 
journeyman engineers with a third apparently needed. 

Reception facilities may present peculiar difficulties in fringe 
areas. Experience will show the degree of need for engineers to work on 
these problems. As many as five engineers may be necessary to assist 
schools with development of their reception systems. 


- 16 - 








An Assistant Chief Engineer for the network probably will be 
necessary because, during construction and planning phases, these activ¬ 
ities will require the full-time attention of a top-level engineer working for 
the commission. The assistant could supervise and train studio-and trans¬ 
mitter operating engineers and microwave engineers. After the construc¬ 
tion work was complete the assistant should be made responsible for han¬ 
dling reception problems if no reception engineer is employed. 

Other Personnel 

~ "5tudio directors as managers of the individual production facil¬ 
ities should be employed and be ultimately responsible to the General Man¬ 
ager but ordinarily be under the direction of the Educational Director. 

Studio directors will have responsibility for operation of the production 
facilities and will have charge of hiring and directing personnel other than 
engineers at each production center. They would also deal with the Regional 
Program Boards and with the television teachers. 

Producers should be provided in each production center to have 
general control of sets, camera work, rehearsals, etc. At. least one 
Program Director should be provided at each production facility, depending 
upon the amount of live programming originating from the individual facilities. 

Clerical and general production help is necessary. Also, artist 
and research help will be needed for the television teachers. This last will 
need to develop as experience is gained in the necessities of producing visuals 
for television teachers. A rule of thumb that might be followed at the outset? 
is one artist for two*teachers. As teachers and their assistants gain experi¬ 
ence the ratio probably will be changed. 

Evaluation personnel responsible to the Educational Director 
should be stationed at each production facility. Their task would be to work 
with the television and classroom teachers to develop criteria for the assess¬ 
ment of the televised work. They could also be given responsibility 
(depending upon budget) for audience surveys. The latter should be carried 
on to help in measuring the breadth of reception of non-classroom pro¬ 
gramming. Without such Audience evaluation, no rational basis exists for 
deciding upon the type of o*iit-of-school programming to be carried on. The 
need for such surveys is felt both in Alabama and in Florida. 

Central ►office personnel needed in addition to those already 
noted will be a coordinator of scheduling responsible for informational 
materials and classroom guides. This person, working under the Educa¬ 
tional Director, would be responsible for releases of schedules and the 
central production and distribution of all course-related publications such 
as study-guides and examinations (if examinations developed by the TV 
teacher are found to be desirable.) He would also have supervisory respon¬ 
sibility for clearance and general editing of study guides produced for 
regionally-oriented programs. 


- 17 - 














Operating at the same level after more than one programming 
facility is in operation, should be a supervisor of production who would be 
responsible for maintenance of high standards of production,, He would 
have no authority with respect ot content, but would analyze studio presen¬ 
tations with a view to improving production quality and give advice on this 
point. He would also be the person responsible for the review, editing, 
and showing of films. As noted elsewhere, any film making up a complete 
program unit (thus excluding film clips used briefly) should be televised by 
the central program unit. This will prevent the duplication and repetition 
that have occurred on the Alabama network. 

An information or public relations person would probably be 
needed to develop and maintain an informational program to answer inquiries 
and to handle press releases. If originating stations were allowed to control 
their own informational programs, difficulties would arise in uneven cover¬ 
age and maintenance of uniform policies. 


Advisory Program Board 

The choice of programs to be televised is, of course, a critical 
factor in the ability of an ETV network to act as a significant aid to the 
classroom teachers in improving the quality of education. The decisions 
on whether or not to provide televised instruction in individual cases must 
be made by educators. Income ways the ETV network will exhibit some 
organizational aspects similar to those found in a Kentucky school district. 
General policies will be in the hands of citizens in accordance with the 
American democratic theory of placing control of education in the hands of 
the people. However, as in the case of a good school board, non-experts 
should not interfere* in areas that are properly the province of educators. 

For this reason, an Advisory Program Board made up of professional 
educators is suggested. > 

A problem with a board such as the one proposed here is that, 
in order to achieve desirable representation, its size can be made unmanage¬ 
ably large. Keeping this problem in mind, its membership might properly 
include: 


a. Superintendent of Public Instruction 

b. „ President of the University of Kentucky 

c. r , President of one or more of the State Colleges 

d. An independent school district superintendent 

e. A county school district superintendent 

f. Two high school teachers 

g. Two elementary school teachers 

h. A representative of a private college in the state. 


-18 - 




One responsibility of the Educational Director would be to 
survey the school systems of the Commonwealth annually to try to ascertain 
the wishes of local school people about which courses should be presented. 
He would also be expected to develop and maintain a roster of teachers 
interested in and capable of acting as television teachers. These two pieces 
of information would be available to the Advisory Program Board to help 
them in their decisions as to what courses to suggest for televising. 

With a system such as this, the programs presented over 
television for use in the classroom should meet the needs of the widest 
possible segment of the schools of Kentucky. Final decisions about net¬ 
work programs must, as has been stated, remain in the hands of the 
Educational Director. He will, however, have the benefit of the thinking 
of a broad cross-section of Kentucky educators and their interest and 
activity should keep his decisions from being arbitrary or unwise. 

Regional Program Boards 

No network can meet all local needs. Some station time should 
be available for regional programs. Probably one-third of the time during 
the school day should be available for locally-produced and regionally- 
consumed programs that would not be sent out over the network. The choice 
of these programs should be primarily that of local people, although the 
responsibility of the commission for the network means that the local 
decisions should be approved by the Eduational Director. 

A regional prdgram board that might be a small-scale model 
of the Advisory Program Board should be provided at each originating 
facility* The Studio Director at that facility should be an ex officio 
member. The remaining members could be appointed by the Educational 
Director upon the recommendation of local school organizations. The 
board would have the responsibility for deciding upon the programs to be 
shown for regional consumption only. 


Course Preparation 

The key to effective utilization of ETY in the schools is consul¬ 
tation between the classroom teacher and the television teacher. The most 
beautifully presented televised lesson is, of course, worthless unless it is 
used and used properly in’the classroom. 

Television teachers should be chosen for their ability to "get 
across" through words and illustrative visual material the subject content. 
Ordinarily they must have been good classroom teachers themselves. They 
need to have a talent for presentation. Talents vary greatly. The person 


- 19 





who makes a good television instructor might not be an extremely out¬ 
standing classroom teacher, for the teaching job has many aspects. In 
any fairly large group of classroom teachers, these many aspects will 
show up in different degrees among different people. 

One teacher may have a talent for making her children want to 
do things, but is able to accomplish this only with close personal contact 
with these students. Another may understand the emotional needs of 
children very well and be able to make her classroom a place for emotional 
as well as intellectual development. Because humans are varied, the 
possibilities are numerous. No one person can be strong in all. 

Because of its cost, and because'of the fact that it will be 
affecting thousands of children, the televised presentation must have the 
benefit of the special talents and capabilities of many teachers. Relying 
upon the television teacher to develop by herself or in consultation with a 
few college specialists, the whole televised course may mean that many 
important elements will be missed or will be only partly covered. Where- 
ever possible broad participation by all involved teachers in course develop¬ 
ment should be fostered. 

In a network situation as many as a thousand teachers in 
individual classrooms mhy receive and use a particular course presentation. 
Bringing all of them together at once and having each of them assist in the 
development of the course may not be possible. Travel and other problems 
would prevent this. What is probably most important is that any course 
have the benefit of the thinking of a cross-section of the teachers who will 
be using it. With as many as four to six television production centers in 
eventual operation programming both for consumption in their own region 
and some portion of- the state-wide presentations, cross-sections should 
be feasible. 


In a particular year, the studio at Murray might be given the 
responsibility for developing for the network a program on sixth-grade 
geography. A good television teacher should be found three to six months 
before the course is to be presented, whether live or taped. The TV teacher 
should then prepare & basic course outline. With this outline as a starting 
point for discussion, the TV teacher should then engage in a series of 
meetings or work-shops with the sixth grade teachers, supervisors, and 
curriculum specialists in the area to develop the material to be covered, 
approaches to various subjects, the schedule of presentation, types of 
visual aids to be used, methods of evaluation, etc. For a regional presen¬ 
tation, the program should be tailored to what the classroom teachers of 
that region feel are the basic needs there. 


- 20 - 





The preceding statement is crucial to the whole problem of use 
of ETV. The televised portion of a class is a tool for the classroom teacher . 
It is not a show-window for the talents of the teacher who happens to be 
chosen to televise it. Its primary purpose in most cases is to provide for 
the highest quality presentation of the information-distributing part of 
teaching. The classroom teacher is responsible for the weaving of this 
important part of teaching into the whole educational process. 

The classroom teacher can "make or break" the use of ETV. 
Should she be unfavorably disposed toward it, she can so influence her 
students that they will receive little benefit from it. Should she consciously 
try to make the most constructive use of it, it will become an integral, 
dynamic part of the learning in her classroom. 

Two main reasons exist for involving classroom teachers in the 
development of the courses to be televised. The first is to insure that what 
is presented is what is needed in the classrooms. The second is to insure 
that what is televised is used. Participation of classroom teachers is nec¬ 
essary for accomplishing both purposes. 

Other subsidiary purposes may be promoted by an organized 
system of consultation, in developing TV courses. Onens the fact that the 
semester’s plan is developed in detail, in a logical sequence, along with a 
study guide for the'teachers using the TV course. Another is the fact that 
such careful consideration is seldom feasible for the individual teacher in 
elementary school®. Loaded down as they are, teachers frequently do not 
have time to do fori themselves the careful study that should be the basis 
for any course. TV provides a focus for this new effort in many commu¬ 
nities. The individual teacher, under this type of arrangement is also 
exposed to her professional counterparts and is able to benefit from their 
thinking about the teaching of the particular subject. 


Continuing Adjustment of Courses 

Course presentations should be revised from year to year. 
Even the best planned series can benefit from being adjusted to include new 
or additional materials. Less obvious, but equally important, is the fact 
that good teachers.Revise.their lesson plans during the course of the year 
as the nped develops. 

The televised courses should be adjusted as experience shows 
jlthe need. The classroom teacher should be able to point out to the TV 
teacher desirable changes in pacing, content, or approach. Because of the 
variety of school systems and students to be served by even one station, 


- 21 




let alone a network, a method of convenient, rapid communication between 
television and classroom teachers must be provided. This has become known 
as "feedback. " 

In cases where a large city has its own ETV station, classroom 
teachers are able to telephone the TV teacher should there be suggestions 
about, or criticisms of the TV presentation. Without such feedback, the TV 
teacher can go his oton way and not provide lessons that are as useful as they 
should be, 


In a network situation where large areas are involved, telephoning 
is expensive. But comment forms (feedback sheets) may reach the TV 
teacher only several days after the classroom teacher has decided to tell 
the TV teacher that '"the discussion of the Amazon River was too fast, please 
spend some time in review, " or some similar comment. Provision for rapid 
feedback is necessary. At the same time, continuous training for classroom 
teachers in methods of utilizing the TV classes should be carried on. Work¬ 
shops would do this as well as pamphlet material and in-service training 
sessions, possibly over TV. 


Budget Implications 

Consultation with large numbers of teachers, curriculum 
specialists, administrators, etc., costs money* The donation of time on 
weekends, during summers, or at night should not always be expected from 
those involved in T.V course planning. Some provision should be made to 
pay, at a minimum, the travel costs of those involved. Should much summer 
work be involved for classroom teachers, a per diem might be necessary. 

Communication concerning the course as it is being presented can 
also be expensive when large numbers of teachers are involved. Especially 
during the early stages of a network, very extensive consultation should be 
planned. Many meetings will usually be necessary. Study guides, outlines, 
feedback sheets, and other materials will have to be printed. Perhaps a 
large telephone cost item should be budgeted so that classroom teachers can 
call about ETV. 

Because no ETV program is worthwhile unless it is used, a 
large expenditure will be justifiable if it increases the scope and effective- 
ness of ETV utilization in the classroom. Should a network be built and a 
TV set be placed in every classroom, use of the programs would be limited 
in quantity and qualify unless individual teachers felt that the programs were 
"by, for, and of" them as they operate In the classroom. 


- 22 - 




One of the best methods of communicating is to have the TV 
teacher visit classrooms using her lessons. She can talk to the class¬ 
room teacher and to students, thus seeing first hand the actual results of 
her work. Video-taping of some of her lessons would allow her to do this. 


Receiving Educational Television 


Receiving the Signal 

Quality of picture received is even more important for use of 
TV in the schools than for home consumption of commercial TV. Some of 
the most important applications of TV for education include showing small 
objects, as in physics, or pointing out distinctive features or markings, 
as in biology classes. If these things cannot be done, the usefulness of tele¬ 
vision as a teaching tool is greatly reduced. 

Stated most simply, the quality of picture received may be af¬ 
fected by what happens at three different stages of the chain. The signal 
that is transmitted, what happens to the signal between the transmitting and 
receiving ends, and what happens to the signal at the receiving end are the 
thre6 basic components of the chain. 

The Transmitted Signal . This network will use UHF channels rather than 
VHF. UHF is less subject to interference than is VHF. Under good con¬ 
ditions, UHF can provide a better picture to close-in receivers than VHF. 
This plan assumes that only high quality equipment will be used. For 
example, programs that should be sent over the network should be televised 
by image orthicon cameras rather than vidicon. Also, care should be taken 
that industrial-type cameras are not used for local programming. 

Between Transmitter and Receiver . The hilly and mountainous terrain 
found in large ar^as of Kentucky will cause reception problems. In part 
this is related to the use of UHF rather than VHF channels. Transmitting 
and receiving UHF signals for channels 14 through about 35 are more efficient 
than for channels between about 35 and 83. The use of the lowest UHF chan¬ 
nels possible, therefore, is highly desirable and has be«n a guideline in this 
proposal. 

For the microwave system, high quality equipment is necessary 
to prevent loss of quality in the signal as it "hops" throughout the state. 
Reduction in signal quality at one point will lower quality at all subsequent 
points. 


- 23 - 






In some cases, especially in Eastern Kentucky, reception 
problems will exist that can be handled only through the use of more than 
the normal amount of equipment. For example, arrangements may have 
to,be made with a community antenna system to receive the signal. In 
some places, where a town is located in a valley, a "repeater" or low - 
pqwered station may have to be provided that will pick up the signal of the 
main transmitter and beam it down to the selected area. These are engi¬ 
neering problems and justify the inclusion of reception engineers in the 
plan. 

At the Receiver . Due to the types of problems noted above, some areas 
will have difficulty in receiving a signal. In many cases, however, local 
school authorities will be able to rely upon commercial sales and repair¬ 
men in the area to aid in providing a good antenna and distribution system. 
In other instances, especially where a large school is concerned, advice 
of engineers provided by companies selling television receiving equipment 
or engineers working for the state network will be necessary. In a large 
school, a single antenna using coaxial cable and boosters may be advisable. 

The reeeiveris themselves should be good quality (not the 
"leader" or cheaper kind) sets. The need is for clear, unmarred pictures 
with a minimum of distortion. Both the Florida and Alabama networks 
have developed sets of minimum specifications for receivers. These are 
distributed to interested schools. Schools are not required to follow the 
specifications. In Kentucky, should the State aid in the purchase of re¬ 
ceivers, specifications Should be developed and schools required to use 
them in their receiver purchases. If receivers are to be bought completely 
with local funds, the specifications should at least be recommended-- 
unless Minimum foundation money is used. In, the last case, schools 
should be required to follow specifications developed by the network engi¬ 
neers. 

The Receiving Teachers 

Although the point is made in the Legislative Research Com¬ 
mission report* too much can not be made of the fact that the teacher in 
the classroom is the key-to the effective use of ETV programs. Classroom 
teachers should participate in the planning of programs; they should be 
able to suggest changes as the year passes. They also need help in using 
the programs. The least expensive method that provides full coverage is 
the teacher s\ manual or study guide. 

Intensive planning is recognized as a necessary part of all 
teaching. Major elements in planning for ETV classes are noted earlier 
in this section. Elements of thvs planning include a detailed outline of 
material to be covered, objectives in terms of student understanding, and 


- 24 - 




a survey of resources. In most places where TV is used regularly in the 
classroom, these elements are organized into a study guide. In many parts 
of the country study guide's are a standard part of ordinary classroom 
instruction. The problem with them is getting people to use them, as was 
stated by the Assistant Superintendent of Schools in Cincinnati, 

. . . it is as foolish to assume that the produc¬ 
tion of a curriculum guide guarantees success in 
the use of television as it is to assume that the pub¬ 
lication of any bulletin will change automatically the 
instructional program in the classroom. Rather, 
it is as necessary to implement the television guide 
in all the proved ways as it is with any other teach¬ 
ing guide. * 

This observation is important. Receiving teachers must be 
aided in developing techniques for making best use of televised portions of 
lesson . Continuous experimentation should be carried on to explore vari¬ 
ous approaches. Enough is known from studies made in other states to 
set forth at the beginning 1 suggestions as to when and for how long, class¬ 
room activities centered'on using the ETV presentation should be. But 
the best types of uses are not so clearly established. 

At least one teacher from each school that will use ETV should 
have rather intensive instruction and practice in use of ETV so that this 
person then can help other teachers in the same school with their problems. 
As yet there is no "one best way" to use ETV in the classroom. The per¬ 
sonality and preferences of individual teachers will result in a variety of 
types of use and this variety should be encouraged. Whatever approaches 
individual teachers decide to use, they should be aided in developing their 
skill in use of ETV. For this they need knowledge of TV's strengths and 
limitations. An organized program of instruction is necessary for this 
knowledge to be made available. 


Home Consumption of ETV 

At the present time, only two commercial ultra-high frequency- 
television stations operate in Kentucky. These are located in Lexington. 
The educational television station in Louisville, WFPK, is UHF. UHF 
channels are located in cities surrounding the Commonwealth. On the 
whole, however, most television reception in Kentucky is through VHF. 


* Robert P. Curry, "Cincinnati’s Adventure into ETV, " 
American School Board Journal, CXXXVIII (March 1959), p. 27. 
Cincinnati has had several years of experience in use of ETV in the class¬ 
room. 

- 25 - 





Very large numbers of sets in the homes of Kentucky citizens can receive 
only VHF. In order to receive UHF, adapting equipment costing $20 and 
over would be needed on these sets. 

This fact reduces the potential audience at the outset of a state¬ 
wide network. Some persons in the television field believe that a higher 
percentage of VHF-UHF receivers will be purchases in the future, thus 
reducing the degree of this limitation, 

A number of cities in Kentucky are, however, linked to com¬ 
munity antenna systems. In these cases, the ETV station can be received 
on sets after conversion of the signal by the antenna system. 

Short of an actual house-to-house survey, no simple method 
appears to be available to discover the number of TV sets in the Common¬ 
wealth that are presently able to receive a UHF signal. In order to safe¬ 
guard against over-optimism, the assumption should be made that less 
than half of the receivers in Kentucky can receive UHF and that the number 
of such sets will not increase very rapidly under present circumstances. 

On this basis, programming during the early years of a network will of 
necessity be aimed at school classes and organized groups that might 
gather at schools to view special programs in the evening or on weekends. 


Surveying Out-of-School Audiences 

One of, the greatest apparent weaknesses of ETV programming 
for out-of-school audiences has been the lack of accurate knowledge of "who 
is listening? how much? how well do they like it?" A fundamental problem 
exists that affects any decisions in the after-school program. This is to 
decide whether to lead or to follow. The people who will make the decisions 
as to what to show over ETV will do so on the basis of what they consider 
to be needs. Perhaps the prime example of this is with so-called "cultural" 
programs. • 

Most Kentuckians are not presently strongly interested in opera, 
in symphonic production,, in ballet, or in modern art. If programs dealing 
with these types of-subjects are shown, probably only a minority of those 
able to receive these on their home sets will watch them. This, then restates 
the problem. Should televised programs be chosen only for their mass 
appeal? If they are not, can use of a publicly-supported statewide network 
for their showing be justified? 

Assuming that these "cultural" programs are valuable in spite 


- 26 - 



of their limited popular appeal, the answer to the problem may be in trying 
to reach a variety of minorities in addition to providing a core of cultural 
programming. As has been pointed oi*t, ETV can be useful for such things 
as agricultural education, home improvement demonstrations, cooking 
demonstrations, etc'. Only a small minority of the people of the Common¬ 
wealth would watch any one of these. 

After care has been taken to advertise as widely as possible 
the offerings of the ETV stations, surveys should be made-to determine 
how many people actually do watch a given program. Audiences, may be 
built up gradually--and no one would believe that citizens will desert night¬ 
time or week-end commercial TV in droves--but on a long-term basis, 
surveys should determine if the audience for soil conservation programs 
is changing significantly or if more people watch an opera program than 
did two years previously. With these types of indicators, wiser choices 
can be made in program selection. 


- 27 - 


WARREN G. MAGNUSON 
CHAIRMM 


'Skntteb States Senate 


I am happy to send you the 
material requested and hope it 
will be of interest and value 

NAEB HEADQUARTukS 


to you. 


Sincerely, 

ptfc 

Jl|12|l|2|3|4|5|6 










/tc4&. 


July 17, 1961 


The Honorable William L. Dawson, Chairman 
House Government Operations Committee 
House Office Building 
U. S. Capital 
Washington 25, D. G. 

Dear Mr. Dawson: 

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters en¬ 
thusiastically endorses S.2119, a bill to amend the Federal Property 
and Administrative Services Act of 1949 so as to permit donations 
of surplus property to schools for the aeentally retarded, schools 
for the physically handicapped, educational television stations 
and public libraries. 

As the trade association, representing this Nation's 57 tele¬ 
vision stations, we believe that adoption of S.2119 would make 
available to educational television stations across the nation 
certain surplus properties at a cost commensurate with thfeir 
ability to pay. One of the big deterents to a natural growth 
and expansion of educational television in this country has been 
the high cost of equipment. This bill would permit educational 
television stations to purchase certain items of needed equipment 
from surplus government property at a more modest cost, thus en¬ 
couraging the growth and expansion of educational television and 
thereby helping develop a valuable resource In the service of 
education and the national welfare. 

Your considered support of this legislation is urgently requested. 

Sincerely, 


William G. Harley 


WGHskfm 


July 18, 1961 


The Honorable John L. McClellan, Chairman 
Senate Government Operations Committee 
3302 New Senate Office Building 
Washington 25, D, C. 

Dear Mr. McClellan: 

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters enthusiastically 
endorses S.2119, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 1949 so as to permit donations of surplus property to 
schools for the mentally retarded, schools for the physically handi¬ 
capped, educational television stations and public libraries. 

As the trade association, representing this Nation's 57 television 
stations, we believe that adoption of S.2119 would make available to 
educational television stations across the nation certain surplus prop¬ 
erties at a cost commensurate with their ability to pay. One of the 
big deterents to a natural growth and expansion of educational tele¬ 
vision in this country has been the high cost of equipment. This 
bill would permit educational television stations to purchase certain 
items of needed equipment from surplus government property at a 
more modest cost, thus encouraging the growth and expansion of 
educational television and thereby helping develop a valuable re¬ 
source in the service of education and the national welfare. 

Your considered support of this legislation is urgently requested. 

Sincerely, 


William G. Harley 


WGH;kfm 


ROBERT S. KERR 
OKLAHOMA 



COMMITTEES: 

CHAIRMAN, 

AERONAUTICAL AND SPACE 
SCIENCES 


QlCwfeil JS&lcde& Jcbenale 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

July 5 , 1961 


FINANCE 
PUBLIC WORKS 

Chairman, Subcommittee on 
Flood Control, Rivers and 
Harbors 

DEMOCRATIC POLICY 


received 

NAEB HEADQUARTERS 


Mr. Harold Hill 

N. A. E. B. 

13^6 Com. Ave.j N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. 


<iUL 6 - i96.| 

*■ pw 

ll?|?|10|i;|l2 | l | S|?|4|f|f 

i 


Dear Hr. Hills 


At your request Senator Kerr is happy to send you three 
copies of S. 2119, a bill to amend the Federal Property and 
Administrative Services Act of 19U9 so as to permit donations of 
surplus property to schools for the mentally retarded, schools 
for the physically handicapped, educational television stations, 
and public libraries. 


Sincerely, 


Don McBride 

Asst, to Rob*t S. Kerr 



87th CONGRESS 
1st Session 


riolod 


S. 2119 



IN THE SENATE OE THE UNITED STATES 

June 21,1961 

Mr. Kerr (for himself and Mr. Monroney) introduced the following bill; 
which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Government 
Operations 

or 

'• -.-V r,»! iit "£*’> "■•••■jijn- n 

A BILL 

To amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services 
Act of 1949 so as to permit donations of surplus property to 
schools for the mentally retarded, schools for the physically 
handicapped, educational television stations, and public li¬ 
braries. 

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 

2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled , 

3 That the first sentence of paragraph (3) of subsection (j) 

4 of section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative 

5 Services Act of 1949 (40 U.S.C. 484 (j) ) is amended (a) 

6 by striking out in clauses (A) and (B) the words “and 

7 universities” and inserting in lieu thereof, in each such clause, 

8 the phrase “universities, schools for the mentally retarded, 




2 


1 schools for the physically handicapped, and educational tele- 

2 vision stations”, and (b) by striking out the word “and” 

3 before “(B)” and by inserting immediately before the 

4 period at the end of such sentence the following: “, and 

5 (0) public libraries”. 

6 Section 203 (j) of such Act is further amended by in- 

7 serting at the end thereof the following paragraph: 

8 “ (7) The term 'public library’, as used in this sub- 

9 section, means a library that serves free all residents of a 

10 community, district, State, or region, and receives its financial 

11 support in whole or in part from public funds.” 


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to Ray Mhx Hurlbert 7/24/61 


photocopies of this letter and attached sent 

JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, ARK., CHAIRMAN 
IJENRY M. JACKSON, WASH. KARL E. MUNDT, S. DAK. 

SAM J. ERVIN, JR., N.C. CARL T. CURTIS, NEBR. 

HUBERT H. HUMPHREY, MINN. JACOB K. JAV1TZ, N.Y. 

ERNEST GRUENING, ALASKA 
EDMUND S. MUSK1E, MAINE 

WALTER L. REYNOLDS, CHIEF CLERK 


QlCniteb Pieties ^2>c«afc 

COMMITTEE ON 
GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS 



July 19 , 1961 


Mr. William G. Harley 
National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters 

DuPont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 

Washington 6, D.C. 

Dear Mr. Harley: 

This will acknowledge receipt of your letter of 
July 18, 1961, with reference to your interest in the bill, 
S. 2119to amend the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 19^9 so as to permit donations of surplus 
property to schools for the mentally retarded, schools for 
the physically handicapped, educational television stations, 
and public libraries. 

Attached is a copy of a staff memorandum setting 
forth the views of the Bureau of the Budget relative to this 
and similar proposals which are now pending before this 
committee. Extensive hearings were held on bills which in 
some instances were identical to those listed in the staff 
memorandum during the 86th Congress and no action was taken 
at that time. No decision has been made as to whether the 
committee will reconsider these proposals during the pre¬ 
sent Congress, but in the event that it does, your letter 
will be made a part of the record of any hearings that may 
be held on such measures. 


Thanking you for your letter, I am 
'Sincerely yours, 





ohn L. McClellan 
Chairman 


Enclosure 


SENATE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS 


STAFF MEMORANDUM NO. 87-1-48 July 20, I96I 

SUBJECT: To Amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 

1949, so as to permit donations of surplus property to new 
categories of eligible donees. 

There have been a number of bills introduced in the 87th Congress and 
referred to this committee to date, proposing the extension of the Federal donable 
property provisions of the above cited Act to other public organizations and groups 
which are not now eligible. These proposals include S. 53 (Indian tribes); S.648 
(certain educational institutions); S. 688 (New Mexico Boys r Ranch); S. IO69 
(certain welfare agencies); S. II36 (educational extension activities conducted 
through 4-H Club organizations); S. 1687 (educational activities conducted by non¬ 
profit organizations providing educational or occupational training for mentally 
retarded children); S. 1811 (park or recreational and historic-monument purposes); 
S. 2119 (Schools for mentally retarded and physically handicapped, educational TV; 
stations and public libraries); and S. 2173 (Fish and Wildlife management activi¬ 
ties). There are also a number of similar proposals pending before the House 
Committee on Government Operations proposing the extension of the Act to other 
groups. 


The following reports have been submitted to the Chairman of the Committee 
by the Bureau of the Budget, cn S. 648 and S. IO69, two of the bills referred to 
above, which set forth the general views of the present Administration on all such 
proposals. Copies of these letters are being furnished to members of the committee 
and sponsors of the above listed bills, for their information. 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 
BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 
Washington, D.C. 


April 19, 1961 


Honorable John L. McClellan 
Chairman, Committee on Government Operations 
United States Senate 
Washington 25, D. C. 

My dear Mr. Chairman: 

This is in response to your requests for a report on S. 648, a bill "To 
amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 so as to permit 
donations of surplus property to certain educational institutions." 

The principal effect of S. 648 would be to redefine existing authority for 
donations of surplus personal property for educational purposes to permit donations 
to "other educational institutions" which would include public libraries and other 
types of activities which might come to be considered educational institutions. 

At present surplus real property may be transferred to libraries but surplus 
personal property may not be donated to a library unless it is part of a school, 
college, or university. 

We would not object to the inclusion of libraries among eligible recipients 
of surplus personal property but would be opposed to the term "other educational 
institutions" as contained in S. 648. That term is so broad and general that we 
believe difficult questions would arise concerning the eligibility of numerous 
organizations whose programs include some incidental elements of education or 
training, although they exist primarily for recreation, entertainment or other 
purposes concerned with personal or local community interests. Although many such 
organizations serve useful purposes in a community, we question whether Federal 
property should be made available to them on a donation basis. 

If amended to redefine "educational purpose" to include a library, S. 648 
would still be clearly distinguishable from the numerous bills to enlarge the 
donation program by adding new categories of eligible donees, such as volunteer 
fire departments, municipal corporations, mosquito control districts, and various 
local agencies. Donations for educational purposes have been authorized for many 
years and legislation adding libraries to the list of eligible donees would not 
constitute a new type o'r category of purpose for which donations would be 
authorized. 

We wish to reaffirm our opposition to any general or piecemeal expansion of 
t he donation program to include additional categories and purposes. Disposal of 
Federal surplus property is a very difficult administrative task and further 


- 2 - 


expansion of the donation program would unduly delay and increase the cost of 
managing and disposing of surplus property. Furthermore, we believe property which 
has been purchased with funds provided by taxpayers throughout the country should 
be donated only for purposes that are compelling in the national interest and should 
not be diverted for local activities that are primarily the responsibility of local 
communities. 

The Government has had very unsatisfactory experience under statutes in 
effect prior to 19^9 which authorized donations for a wide variety of purposes. 

Since the various eligible donees frequently wanted and claimed the same surplus 
property it was necessary to establish priority systems under which first one and 
then another potential claimant reviewed the lists of available surplus. That 
process delayed the disposal of surplus property for long periods, sometimes for 
years, while the Government continued to incur the cost of custody and storage and 
the losses due to deterioration in stock. In the end, only a very small portion of 
the available surplus property was claimed by any of the eligible donees. These 
conditions led the first Hoover Commission to recommend repeal of the various 
donation statutes and in 19^9> with President Truman*s approval, most of the 
statutes were repealed. Donations for educational purposes were authorized, how¬ 
ever, and later amendments to the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act 
authorized donations for public health and civil defense purposes. 

The volume of surplus property and the administrative problems involved in 
its disposal are still formidable and we believe it would not be in the public 
interest to complicate the problem again by adding new categories of eligible 
donees. 

Sincerely yours, 

/s/ PHILLIP S. HUGHES 

Assistant Director for 
Legislative Reference 


. 0 . 

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 
Bureau of the Budget 
Washington 25,D.C. 


July lb, 1961 


Honorable John L. McClellan 
Chairman, Committee on Government Operations 
United States Senate 
Washington 25. D. C. 

Dear Mr. Chairman: 

This is in reply to your request for a report on S. IO 69 , a bill "To amend 
the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 19^9 to authorize the 
disposal of surplus property to certain welfare agencies." 

To the existing statutory authority for the donation of surplus Federal 
personal property for purposes of education, public health and civil defense, S. 

IO 69 would add certain tax supported or tax exempt welfare or recreation agencies. 

As defined in the bill, the term "welfare or recreation agencies" could include such 
agencies as the Salvation Army, YMCA, YWCA, Travelers Aid, homes for the aged, 
youth centers, adoption centers and other similar organizations. Though we do not 
question the worthiness of these agencies and organizations we would be opposed to 
the enactment of S. IO 69 . 

We wish to reaffirm our opposition to any general or piece-meal expansion 
of the donation program to include additional categories and purposes. Disposal 
of Federal surplus property is a very difficult administrative task and further 
expansion of the donation program would unduly delay and increase the cost of 
managing and disposing of surplus property. Furthermore, we believe property which 
has been purchased with funds provided by taxpayers throughout the country should 
be donated only for purposes that are compelling in the national interest and should 
not be diverted for local activities that are primarily the responsibility of local 
communities. 

The Government has had very unsatisfactory experience under statutes in 
effect prior to 19^9 which authorized donations for a wide variety of purposes. 

Since the various eligible donees frequently wanted and claimed the same surplus 
property, it was necessary to establish priority systems under which first one and 
then another potential claimant reviewed the lists of available surplus. That 
process delayed the disposal of surplus property for long periods, sometimes for 
years, while the Government continued to incur the cost of custody and storage and 



3- 


and the losses due to deterioration in stock. In the end, only a very small 
portion of the available surplus property was claimed by any of the eligible 
donees. These statutes were repealed in 19^9 in order to speed up, simplify and 
make less costly the task of surplus property disposal. 

The volume of surplus property and the administrative problems involved in 
its disposal are still formidable and we believe it would not be in the public 
interest to complicate the problem again by adding new categories of eligible 
donees. 

Sincerely yours, 

/s/ PHILLIP S. HUGHES 

Assistant Director for 
Legislative Reference 


Walter L. Reynolds 
Staff Director 





WAYNE STATE 


UNIVERSITY 

DETROIT 2. MICHIGAN 


July 20, 1961 


The Honorable John D. Dingell 
House of Representatives 
Washington, D. C 

Dear Representative Dingell: 

With the recent news about the general education bill, I am 
quite concerned about the ETV or Roberts Bill - HR-i32. 

I am sure you are familiar with the development of educational 
television in our state, particularly since I remember your 
being in our studios in the past. 

Many of the mounting pressures in education can be resolved 
by this medium. It is not a panacea, but it will be a major 
tool if we get to use it. I hope you can influence some of 
your committee colleagues by informing them of the work 
being done in Detroit at Wayne State, University of Detroit, 
and the Board of Education. 

Please put your skillful energies into the fight and secure the 
passage of this important amendment to the 1934 Communications 
Act. If l can be of any help, you know that you need only to ask. 

Sincerely yours, 


Dr. Lee S Dreyfus 
Assistant Director 
Radio and Television 


LSD:c 

be: W. Harley 







Congressman J. Arthur Younger 
House Office Building 
Washington 25, D. C. 


July 21, 1961 


— JDear Art: 

fp) 

You perhaps do not remember kibitzing on the honeymoon of a young couple nearly 
thirty years ago on a trip from Seattle to San Francisco aboard the SS Enana 

y lexander , but I certainly do, for I was the bridproom. My wife was Elizabeth 
raith, daughter of Helen and Rex Smith, I hope your responsibilities in Congress 
have not dulled your enjoyment of the practical joke — nor that your long 
^residence in California has caused you to completely forget Seattle and the 
r p| University of Washington 

My purpose in writing you is to tell you of a deep interest I have in the bills 
j°r federal aid to educational television which are before the Committee of 
V^yoreign and Interstate Commerce in the House. I am manager of a non-commercial 
educat onal television station operated by the University of Washington as a 

- joint venture with the public school districts of Seattle and King County. 

i-jlecause I happen, at the present time, also to be Chairman of thetelevision 
LJftoard of the National Assn, of Educational Broadcasters, and national chairman 
the c°mmLttee c f educational stations affiliated with the National Educat onal 
Television and Radio Center, my interest in such legislation extends far beyond 
the needs of the University of Washington or the State of Washington. 

I was privileged to be asked to testify on this legislation before the Senate 
yomznerce Committee earlier this year. As you know the Senate bill was ntroduced 
>y Warren Magnuson from Washington. The point of my testimony then, and the thing 
(1 would like to tell you is this: The most important thing whch the educat onal 
television stat ons can do is to help the public schools meet the complex nstruct- 
onal problems they face growing out of rapidly increasing enrollments and the 
nev table shortage of skilled teachers. Many of the 57 existing educational 
television stations would not have come into being had not the schools of their 
respective communities been assisted In acquiring capital equipment funds through 
grants from the Ford Foundation and others. The sources that many of us were able 
to draw on for funds no longer are avallable to the stations which must be created 
n the next few years f the schools of our country are to be able to take advantagi 
of the medium of television to help improve their instruction. The availability of 
Federal funds will make poss ble the development of many stat ons which will not 
otherwise be able to come into being. And it may be that this type of aid to these 
stat ons is a proper function of the Federal government, for the ^*4*-of television 
and particularly these non-commercial educational stations are in a sense, creatures 
of the federal government. 











Page 2 

J. Arthur Younger 


I do not have the competence to tell you how the Federal government should 
spend its money, so I do not urge you to vote for this measure. I can only 
tell you from my knowledge of what educational television facilities are 
enabling schools to do, that such facilities are going to be of tremendous 
importance to helping our schools do the job we need them to do in the years 
ahead of us. Many schools will be unable to acquire the capital funds to 
construct the facilities they need without help from somewhere, and t may be 
that Federal help s what is needed. Operating funds are generally not an 
Insurmountable problem, for many schools are providing the operating funds 
to support these stations, out of fthe savings in Instruct onal costs which 

television broadcasting makes possible. 

£ 


'p^jhir station derives 2/3 its operating support from the public school districts 
of the area which make payment of $1.00 per student per year to the University . 
The $130,000 from these sources is supplemented #by $65,000 from the University 
rof Washington and additional funds from Seattle University, Seattle Pacific 
V^jCollege and the Seattle Public Library. We have been in operation for more 
than 6 years, but had not the Fund for Adult Education given us an initial gift 
of $150,000 to purchase capital equipment items, it is quite possible that even 
/p^this community would not have developed such a station. After the initial seed 
isoney from the Fund for Adult, the community itself provided amother $400,000. 

A small amount of help from the Federal government might stimulate a large 
number of presently un-served areas to develop stations. 




a: 


I would appreciate your taking a good look at the measures when they come 
before your full committee (the legislation has been recommended to the 
ull committee by the sub-committee) to see if you can support them. 


st personal regards. 


Loren B. Stone 
Manager KCTS-TV 













July 24, 1962 


Hr. David Berkman 
1072 X. 18th Street 
Brooklyn 30 , Heir York 


Dear Mr* Berkaant 

I am returning your manuscript which you sent to me cm June 1?. In 
discussing this with other members of the staff, we felt that there is 
certainly a place for an article based on the premise that stations 
should have the guts to stand up for certain things—essentially, to 
editorialize. lou have the beginning for such a piece in your article. 
However, we feel that your field is not wide enough! you are using only 
one example. Surely there are others. (Without some supporting evid¬ 
ence, fear instance, I do not think we can blithely make the statement 
that WMCA Is the on£sr static* in the country which editorially sup¬ 
ported Kennedy.) ^ r 

you will study some of the other stations throughout the country (in¬ 
cluding educational stations! WHA, in Madison. Wisconsin, has a long 
.history of airing the views of "controversial" figures, for example) and 
rewrite your manuscript to make it more of a plea for the idea you have 
in mind and less of a eulogy for WMCA, 1 would certainly like to see it 
again* 


I hope to run your satire soon—perhaps in the November-Dee ember issue. 

Sincerely, 


(Mrs.) Betty McKenzie 

Publications Editor 


bmok/sp 


blcc: Mr. Harold E. Hill 
Mr* Walter B. Emery 










L(^JXt 





ALABAMA EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION COMMISSION 

BIRMINGHAM 3. ALABAMA 


July 24, 1961 


Hon. John J. Flynt, Jr. 

Committee on Interstate and 
Foreign Commerce 
House of Representatives 
House Office Building 
Washington, D. C» 

Dear Representative Flynt: 

This is to reaffirm our feeling in Alabama that the priming of the 
educational television pump in the United States by Congress at 
this time is, in our opinion, not only necessary but imperative. 
Through this means, we feel that we can overcome some of the 
handicap that we suffer in comparison to other world powers in 
the field of education at this time. 

To bolster and bulwark the strength that we already have in edu¬ 
cational television in the United States, we further strenuously 
urge that the provision in the original House bill, providing for 
matching of previously invested capital funds, be re! nstated. 

We know that moving from known strength to new areas is wise 
procedure. The pioneer operations of educational television, 
many of which now need replacement of worn out broadcasting 
equipment, are best bets for carrying forward this great venture. 
Your support of this provision can well mean the strengthening of 
the bill and possibly making for the strongest feature of the bill. 

With kindest regards, I am 


Sincerely yours, 


Raymond D. Hurlbert 
General Manager 


RDH/ml 

enc. 


Come** Of tfce ttntteb SK&tti 

at *fprr*CTtjirtb« 



July 26, 1961 

Mr. Rickard Fleming 
RepohUean State Committee 
• Beacon Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Dear DUk: 

Tkuk you for your thoughtful l.tt.r of th. 24th with r.f.r.nc. to 

HR 132. 


1 will b. parfactly frank with you. I di.cu..od thi. matter today 
with th. Committ.. and wa. inform.d that thi. m.a.ur. i. fading with 
ao actio. .ch.duUd. It wa. iudicat.d to m. that con.id.r»tio« of tk. 
bUl by th. Houa. durUg thi. ....ion i. r.mot., if not impocihU. 

1 r ** r,t *** 1 could “ ot * iv » T®« » mor. optomi.tic raapoao*. 
How.v.r, thoro i. ca.id.rahl. oppo.ltioa to making .uch a Urg. .um 
of moa.y availabl. to .ach Stato ia th. Oaioa. o.pocially at a tim. wh.a 
wo ar. .upped to ha "Ught.nUg our 6.1 to." rurthormoro, th.ro io 
to. little tim. loft ia thi. ao.aioa aad too much bu.iaoa. of aa urgent 
Mt»re to settle. 

Looking forward to teeing you in Washington in August, 


Sineerdly, 


HABTMQB ORTH, M.C. 


tJC 


7V6±s 


SCA4 




I 










ASSISTANT MAJORITY IXADCR 


TORBERT H. MACDONALD 

Sth Oistnict. Massacnusstts 

( 

COMMITTEES: 

INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE 
Subcommittee on transportation 
amo Aeronautics 

MERCHANT MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Congress! of tfje ®mteb States 


CAPITOL J-27SI 


^ 0 U«f of »eprt0entatibt0 

nasfjfngton, 2D. C. 

July 28, 1961 


RECEIVED 

NAE8 hlAP AR’£RS 
AUG u V '961 


*» p« 


i 

Mr. Ralph Lcwell 
Lowell Institute Cooperative 
Broadcasting Council 
84 Massachusetts Avenue 
Cambridge 39, Massachusetts 


Dear Mr. Lowell: 


I received your recent letter expressing your 
interest in H.R. 123, the Educational Television bill. 


I lcnow you will be pleased to learn that the 
Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, of which I 
am privileged to be a member, has scheduled executive 
consideration oi this legislation to start August 8, 1961. 

I appreciate your talcing the time to let me have 
your views on thi 3 subject and I can assure you that I will 
put forth every effort to have the bill favorably considered 
by the Committee and the Congress. 

With kind regards, I am 




Sincerely- your 3 , 


y P 7 — 

/ 0 — 

Torbert H. Macdonald, M.C. 




FmSlSS S C S“ L ™ I ' 5a » ^ 

TO ASSIST MmO^KHT OT ««S" 

U Pro1rU,ioc ol Padtral funds for StMtB , . 

d/cc r&gioo&I eusfT^syu 

~ * “““- ““•• ®* *~l»— « 

—1- <*,, „ nmj p „ !s 

District of Coluabu sod Puerto Rico) 

2. « '"•>*» —• - • «** .»«. «. U-l. «... 

- >«2~1•*»,!«., M 

Deals specified herein should neks __ 

««ia Mir.. sc* *u«n«nce for earSUr insert- 

"“* i. «~u. 

p- »■ «•«,«, « 

Pv^arto aico) 

J. PPMU. « ««1 <*» ttmtlUry «*. _ 

*® rvlc ** e ° *>• «dteial9t:er«rti by the 0 s m ■ ■ « 

y D S CoBgal«^i^. r EteaUcc^ 

®* follow* over a ^yeer period: 

(•) 2. ~~~h. „ 

" ««-. ^ 

*** y~r (based on current rate of ainiUr expendi ture* 

Title ¥11)* 

CD) Tor assistance in the trains „f per^i ia oration «**- 
utilisation of sducatioo* fUeUis.. by ««. , f 

fellowships, eorieshops, institutes, and conference*, etc: 

$275 f 000 p«sr year, 

(e) For assistance in the creetion of regW, national and inter.. 

*“ h — “ d di8telbUti “ f for luatruetiatial 

television Materials: $1,800,000. 


- 2 - 

(d) For bibliographic services and information — publications 
oad ca Colog log to facilitate distribution cad use of educe** 
Clonal television materiel*: $150,000 per year* 

(*) For educational lloloon and consultation service* to make 
available to educational broadcasters the assistance of 
outstanding educators and technical specialists: $300,000 
per year. 

(f) Both the program of auxiliary services and the program of 

survey and construction grants should be generally supervised 
and approved by a statutory Satlo Ml bleary Committee similar 
to that established under tbs ptwisions of Title VII, NDEA„ 

These recommendations would imply Fader a ', budgetary cdnmltmsnts aa 


follows over a five-year period: 

Surveys and pleneo««»oo.... $ 520,000 

Grants for ETV fseiUtl«s».o«.oo«..*«.o.«o»««o 52,000,000 

Auxiliary services (9 $4,525,000 

per ymr).,,,.,..... 22.625.000 

nmi L..$75,145,000 







3 


Y®ar«fey«y**r appropriation* of there tent* wxxld ** ladic * tad *® 
follows: 



oeaOQ $ 380,000 

surreys of 38 States (<3 $10,uooj©*•••©•••••••“• 

equipment grant* (28 St*t«* @ $250,000 and 



$12,905,006 

?ha/t rayri 

surveys of 14 States <@ $10,000)» o .o.a*ooe*«o®« 
equipnent greets (14 States <® $100,000, 

.....$ 140,000 

28 States @ $500,000, md 10 Ststss 





$22,565,000 


3yd Y&gr: 

ociulpaeni: greets (14 State* (* $230,000, 

28 State* @ $230,000, «od 10 Stataa 
4® $500,000)#o6oiM>o**e*»««oo»«o««»«*»» ## 
auxiliary services®® 0 c©«oo©£>.ooo*o*c««*o* 


0 • o s © « « 


$15,500,000 

4-525.00P 

$20,025,000 


Iquipaeafc great# (10 States @ $150,000 

#gni 14 States (® |500,000)o**»i»«**«®*®» oet> 
auxiliary 


0 $ 8,500,000 
• 4.525.000 
$13,025,000 


5 th Year : 

•quipasnt greet# (14 States @ $l50,000).*.o«o. 
auxiliary ..... 


$ 2,100,000 
4^525.000 

$ 6,625,000 


















July 31, 1961 


The Honorable Oren Harris 
Chairman, Committee on Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce 
House of Representatives 
House Office Building 
Washington 25, D.C. 

Dear Chairman Harris: 

We appreciate that members of Congress, and especially those of you who 
hold key leadership positions, are faced with tremendous responsibilities 
in establishing frontiers among the many worthy legislative proposals 
awaiting action. In this respect we commend to your attention H132. 

In terms of its crucial importance in helping education cope with the crisis 
in teacher and facilities deficits; in terms of the importance of serving 
allocations reserved for education before they are lost forever; and in terras 
of developing a social, educational and general public program since for 
the entire nation * H132 would seem to merit early consideration. 

The state-by-state studies which NAEB and JCEB have supplied your com¬ 
mittee testify to the amount of interest and to the effort the states have 
made in organizing their limited resources and planning for further devel¬ 
opment. Much of this development has been sparked by the hope and pro¬ 
mises of Federal legislation, which has now been before Congress three 
times. Mother postponement at this time would seriously handicap this 
development for years, - in some cases, many years. ETV has reached a 
critical moment; it moves now or endangers its total progress • 

We hope that your committee may see fit to report this measure out shortly 
so that it may be brought before the Rules Committee and then, hopefully, 
before the House of Representatives. 


Sincerely ^burs. 


WGH/mm 


William G. Harley 


‘TQCwiteutfi' 


W- 


THE MONTANA EDUCATIONAL 
TELEVISION COMMITTEE 

Chairman: 

Dr. Thomas Moriarty 
Eastern Montana College 
Billings 

Secretary: 

Mr. Hardy Berry 
Montana State College 
Bozeman 

Project Director: 

Dr. Erling S. Jorgensen 
Montana State University 
Missoula 

Engineer: 

Mr. Archer S. Taylor 
Montana State University 
Missoula 

Members: 

Mr. Russell Barthell 
Executive Secretary, 

University of Montana 
Helena 

Mr. Al Blockey 
Bozeman Public Schools 
Bozeman 

Dr. Wesley Caspers 
Western Montana College 
Dillon 

Mr. Robert B. Farnsworth 
Superintendent of Schools 
Great Falls 

Mr. M. C. Gallagher 
Superintendent of Schools 
Billings 

Dr. William Lisenby 
Northern Montana College 
Havre 

Mr. Walter Marshall 
931 Knight Street 
Helena 

Dr. Kenneth M. McLeod 
Montana School of Mines 
Butte 

Miss Harriet Miller 
State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction 
Helena 

Mrs. Laura Jane Taft 
Superintendent of Schools 
Glacier County, Cutbank 
Mr. Peter Vukad 
Superintendent of Schools 
Wibaux 


EDUCATIONAL^|^g(0|^ PROJECT 

NAEB HEADQUARTERS 

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY 
AUG 2U 1361 MISSOULA, MONTANA 

** p* 

*?i ?l ?|I0(11|12| 112| B| 4 } Sj6 

August 21, 1961 

VERY IMPORTANT MEMO 


TOg Montana ETV Committee members and others interested in the 
development of ETV in Montana 

FROMg Erling So Jorgensen, Director, Montana ETV Project 


I have just learned that Ho R* 132 (The Roberts Bill), 
providing for matching federal aid to construction of educational 
television transmission facilities, has been favorably reported 
out of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee by 
a 21 to 3 vote* The major amendment was to restore the provision 
allowing 25 per cent credit for previous ETV expenditures toward 
matching funds 0 

H<, Ro 132 differs from S° 205 (The Magnusen-Metcalf Bill), 
passed earlier by the Senate* ’While the Senate bill provides for 
outright grants of up to one million dollars for each state for 
the construction of physical transmission facilities for educa¬ 
tional television. Ho R* 132 provides matching funds up to one 
million dollars, per state on a fifty-fifty basis and grants up 
to ten thousand dollars to each state also on a matching basis 
for the purpose of making a survey in the development of a pro- 
gram, for ETV in each state* 

The Montana ETV Committee is oh record in favor of Senate 
Bill 205 and its companion bill H* R* 965* ^he House'Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce Committee now having passed H* R„ 132, it 
behooves each of us to support passage of H* R* 132 and then exert 
our influence to see that revisions are made in conference com¬ 
mittee between the Senate and the House* 

H* R* 132 must now be passed by the House Rules Committee 
before it can be placed on the House calendar. The members 
are listed on the reverse side* r hope you will write to any 
members of that committee or its chairman, Howard W* Smith, ex¬ 
pressing your view that this bill should be passed by the Rules 
Committee for consideration by the entire House* It would be wise 
to send a carbon copy of your letter to our representatives, 

Arnold Olsen and James Battin* 







Members of the House Rules Committee are: 


Democrats* Howard W. Smith, Broad Run, Virginia; William M. 
Colmer, Pascogoula, Mississippi; Ray J. Madden, Gary, India¬ 
na; James J, Delaney, Long Island City, New York; James W. 
Trimble, Beriyville, Arkansas; Homer Thornberiy, Austin, 
Texas; Richard Bolling, Kansas City, Missouri; Thomas P, 
O'Neill, Jr., Cambridge, Massachusetts; Carl Elliott, Jasper, 
Alabama; and B. F. Sisk, Fresno, California. 

Republicans: Clarence J. Brown, Blanchester, Ohio; Katherine 
St., George, Tuxedo Park, New York; H, Allen Smith, Glendale, 
California; Elner J. Hoffman, Wheaton, Illinois; and 
William H. Avery, Wakefield, Kansas. 






COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

BOX 911. HARRISBURG 


August 21, 1961 


Dr. William G. Harley 
National Association of 
Educational Broadcasters 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N. W., 
Washington, 6, D. C. 


RECh. 

1 J \z 

NAErs D 

r p 

AUG 2 4 

1961 

ft M 


7i?i^io,n,i2i 

1 1 


( 


Dear Dr. Harley: 


Thank you for your August 17 MEMO regarding 
the Roberts bill (HR 132) providing for Federal aid to 
educational television. 

As you know, we are very much interested in 
every aspect of educational television, and support leg¬ 
islation with respect to Federal aid in this regard. 

Our State Superintendent, Dr. Charles H. Boehm, 
testified in Washington on the Magnuson bill and his tes¬ 
timony was well received. 

We shall be happy to be in touch with the House 
Members on educational television. Dr. Boehm shares 
these feelings. 

With best wishes - 


Sincerely 

Mv dO 

Neal V. Musmanno 
Deputy Superintendent 


UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 


r 


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
DEPARTMENT OF RADIO-TV-FILMS 


August 23, 1961 


Mr. Harold E. Hill, 
Administrative Vice President 
Dupont Circle Office Building 
1346 Connecticut Avenue, N 0 W 0 
Washington 6, D 0 C. 


RECEIVED 

NAE8 HEADQUARTERS 

AUG 2 8 '961 
»« ra 

.7|8,9|10,11,12,1|2,8|4|5|? 


Dear Harold: 


t 


My pleasure. Please let me know if I should send more. 

Best to all, 

/ 

Len 


P.S. I am wondering whether the approach to the Rules Com¬ 
mittee is different from the previous committees which 
have dealt with ETV. Your note seemed less anxious. 


While waiting to hear whether you advise we go all out 
and in what particular way, I have asked the Governor's 
office and the University President's office to write 
to Howard Smith and this is being done this week. Would 
it help to do more and what? 


Best, 


OLP 


OLP:rb 









MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY east lansing 


COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION ARTS • DIVISION OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS 
DEPARTMENT OF TELEVISION AND RADIO 




A/ear Uai* 

Is there anything you can do to stimulate 
the House Mules committee to approve n* iu 
l.$2t the cohorts nillj, providing aid for 
construction of educational television 
stations? line senate has long been in 
favor of this type of legislation and. the 
House interstate and -foreign uoramerce com¬ 
mittee has reported out this hill. It 
seems such a tragedy that the will of Cong¬ 
ress and a substantial oody of public opin¬ 
ion throughout the country should be frus¬ 
trated by a few reactionaries who seem to 
be more interested in building roads \ good 
as this is),than in helping build communi¬ 
cation facilities and or ages of under¬ 
standing* As whip in the House, I hope 
you may be able to use your influence to 
get the bill out so Congress will,at least, 
have a chance to vote on it* 

Clad to report that my book is having a 
good sale, the attachment may be of inheres 
to you* X was in Oklahoma this summer* hm 
many of our mutual friends* was interviewee 
over WXY-fV and KVOO-TV about ray book and 
did some consulting work at Oklahoma state 
University* it was pleasant to get back to 
my old stomping ground. Civ© my regards to 
Mike, John, hob and other Oklahoma Congress¬ 
men when you see them* saw you on tv not 
long ago* fou did very well* more appear¬ 
ances by you on tv would be in order* 

sincerely, 

xhe Honorable Carl Albert 

House Office building waiter israery 

Cm 



Mr. 0. Leonard Press 
Department of R&dio-TV-PLlms 
University of Kentucky 
Lexington, Kentucky * 



Dear Len: 


I did not mean to imply that there w not urgent need to express 
points of view to the House Rules Committee. 3his ComLttee now holds 
the key to whether or not federal aid to m legislation will ccaae out 
of this session of Congress, therefore, it seems to us that it is vi¬ 
tally important that all those interested in this legislation should 
make their views known, post haste, to any members of the Committee, 
with whom they have any contact* 


As of this time, the chances appear to he sli^rtly less than 50-50 
that the bill will get out of the Rules Committee. 


Cordially, 


Harold E. Hill 

Administrative Vice President 


W^^xalm 





AUG 2 8 1961 




From: William L. Bowden 

Date: August 23, 1961 { 

Subject: FEDERAL EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION BILL, H.R.132 

On August 17, H.R.132 (the Roberts Bill), providing for Federal aid to construct¬ 
ion of educational television station, was favorably reported out of the House 
Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee by a large affirmative 21-3 vote. 

The principal provisions of the bill, as they now stand, are as follows: 

1. That $10,000 matching funds per state be appropriated for state 
ETV surveys. 

2. That $25,000,000 matching funds be appropriated for the construction 
of ETV stations in the nation over a four-year period of time. 

3. That provisions be made for state plans to be developed cooperatively 
by two or more states if so desired. 

k. That grants be made on a project-by-project basis rather than on a 
state-by-state basis, (intrastate and interstate cooperation between 
educational agencies likely will be viewed with favor.) 

5. That credit will be given for previous capital expenditures for ETV. 

(This feature was restored by the Committee last week.) 

6. That no federal grants be contemplated for closed circuit transmission 
within a single school or a single site. 

The bill must now be passed by the House Rules Committee before it can be 
placed on the House calendar. Your views regarding this bill are important 
at this particular point in time. 

The Southern members of the House Rules Committee, House of Representatives, United 
States Congress, are listed below in the event you wish to make your views known 
to any of them. 


The Honorable Howard W. Smith, Broad Run, Virginia (Chairman) 
The Honorable William M. Colmer, Pascagoula, Mississippi 
The Honorable James W. Trimble, Berryville, Arkansas 
The Honorable Homer Thornberry, Austin, Texas 
The Honorable Carl Elliott, Jasper, Alabama 



William L. Bowden 
Associate Director 


WLB:gh 






















National Educational Television and Radio Center 
Washington Office 
1619 Massachuset ts A ven ue, NJ. 


November 13, 1961 


cc: James Robertson 
John White 
Arthur Griffin 
Paul Owen 

Subject: ETV Legislation 

I am sending along major excerpts from a news item which appeared 
in The Washi ngton Pos t on November 9, 1961, "The Road Show” is another 
opportunity for expressing our views concerning the early favorable 
action on ETV legislation (H,R,132) now before the House Rules Committee. 

I am also sending this information to the Washington Headquarters of the 
NAEB with the request that they too may alert their membership of this 
further opportunity to express opinions on ETV legislation before Congress 
reconvenes in January. 

*Kennedy Road Show' Leaves Chicago, 

Moves to Nashville 


’’Chicago, NovoB - President Kennedy’s latest Washington road show, 
’The White House regional conference,* moved on to Nashville tonight 
after opening a whole new avenue for direct White House contacts with 
the people during a two-day stand in Chicago, 

For the second straight day, Federal, state and local officials 
exchanged banter and ideas with representative local citizens in a 
quest for solution of such common problems as rehabilitation of our 
cities and medical care for the aged. 

Postcards Solicited 

to'avoid any KIIcH~in two-way communications, big blue postcards, 
addressed to ’the President, the White House, Washington 25, D„C.»’ 
were made available here to every regional participant to write 
Mr. Kennedy directly. 

Large posters, displaying the picture of the President, extended 
this invitation: ’The President wants to know your views--write to him 
today. Cards are available here. r 

The cards appeared for the first time in the east room of the 
Sheraton Chicago Hotel, where the regional panels on ’Opportunities for 
Living in Later Years, headed by Assistant HHFA Administrator Sidney 
Spector, and 'Opportunity for Health and Welfare,/ chaired by Under 
Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Ivan Nestigan, were lunching. 

8 We just want to be sure that anybody who has any question to 
ask or suggestions to make and who didn’t get a chance to do it here can 
send it directly to Washington,’ said Nestigan 


MEMORANDUM 

TO: All ETV Station Managers 

From: David C. Stewart 

Director, Washington Office 







- 2 - 



"Keyno ted by Weaver 

In keynoting today’s closing Chicago area session* Administrator 
Weaver told his Federal-state local audience; 

know the directions in which we are trying to move, Now we 
want to find out if you think these are the right directions, and where 
you think we should go from here,* 

Reminding them Congress will be back in two months, he prompted: 

»We will report to the President what you have told us in these 
conferences, and we will start working on next year’s legislative 
program„' 

In the question-and-answer follow-up, Weaver was asked the 
inevitable question of whether Federal aid in health community facilities 
urban development and other areas would not lead to Federal control <> 

Weaver said he ran into that charge everywhere, and he called it a 
bugaboo—-’an attempt to prevent the Federal Government from assuming 
responsibilities it ought to assume/ He said the Morrill Act* 
setting up the land grant colleges, had long since demonstrated Federal 
money could not buy Federal control„" 


DoC.S 


DCS:db 

cc: William Harley, NAEB 



Harold Hill, NAEB 
JCEB Members 



NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION and RADIO CENTER 

1619 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, N. W. ■ WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 


COPY 

Sent for the information of 

William Harley 


7 


December 8, 1961 


Mr. William J. lewis 
Director, Ford Foundation ETV 

Project in Vermont 
The University of Vermont 
Pomeroy Hall 
Burlington, Vermont 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

I have received a copy of your letter concerning 
JSTV legislation written to Bill Harley, dated December 6, 

1961. Without wishing to put my oar into this correspondence 
I do, nevertheless, want to tell you how important we regard 
your thoughts and actions on this matter of ETV legislation. 

I am happy to learn that you have taken the matter up 
with Senator Aiken. This is very helpful. We hesitated last 
session to make too much of a concentrated effort on the 
Catholic element in the Hules Committee on the basis of the 
thought that this action might bestir an unfavorable reaction. 
But the last legislative session was a pretty awful snarl 
and perhaps things have simmered down somewhat since Congress 
adjourned. With respect to your third point, those persons 
on the Hules Committee who might be opposed, or at least 
doubtful, would include (in my own view): 

Howard Smith, D., Va. 

William Colmer, D.,Miss. 

James J. Delaney, D., N.Y. 

Thomas P. O'Neill,Jr., D.,Mass. 

Clarence J. Brown, R., Ohio 

We believe it would be a great advantage to us if the Rules 
Committee would consider the legislation early in this next 
session—before we get bogged down once again in the mire of 
religious and federal aid controversy. 


Katherine St.George, R.,H.Y. 
H. Allen Smith, R.,Calif. 
Elmer J. Hoffman, R.,Ill. 
William H. Avery, R.,Kansas 


I am enclosing a dozen copies of a document entitled "A 
Report on ETV Legislation ,f recently published by the Joint Council 
on Educational Broadcasting. We have some additional copies of 
this as does Bill Harley. 


RECEIVED 

NAEB HEADQUARTERS 


Enclosure: 

DCS:db 

cc: William Harle 
Jack McBride 


DEC 111961 


incerely, 



DavicPCTstewart, Director 
Washington Office 


t 





THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
BURLINGTON, VERMONT 


DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 



Mr* William G. Harley 
Suite 1119 

DuPont Circle Building 

131;6 Connecticut Avenue, N. W. 

Washington 6, D. C. 

Dear Mr* Harleys 


December 6, 1961 

RECEIVED 

NAEB HEADQUARTERS 
DEC 8 1961 

AM pm 

■?l?l ?|1,0|11|12| J|2|8|4|6|(5 

t 


Last week I had a conversation with Jack McBride, station manager of KUON-TV, 
relative to the Roberts Bill* I gave him three suggestions on how I thought we 
might be more likely to succeed with our campaign, and he recommended I pass 
them on to you* They are as follows: 

1. I have contacted Senator George Aiken of our state and have filled 
him in as to Vermont's need for federal ETV money* He has promised 
to contact the members of the Rules Committee urging them to pass 
this legislation. It seems to me it would be desirable if each 
Senator would contact the Rules Committee on behalf of his own state* 

2. We are going to get the leaders of the Catholic organizations in 
Vermont to write to those members of the Rules Committee who are 
Catholics urging them to vote for this legislation because ETV 
obviously transcends all religious boundaries* We think this 
would be a good idea for other states to pursue. 

3. If your office could let us know who the doubtful or opposed 
members of the Rules Committee are, we could concentrate our 
campaign on them instead of spreading it over those who are 
already favorable. Would it be possible for you to send me the 
names of those who are known to be opposed or neutral to the 
Roberts Bill? 

I hope these suggestions will be helpful to you and to the cause of educational 
television in general. 


Sincerely, 


William J. Lewis, Director 

Ford Foundation ETV Project in Vermont 


WJLsMD 


cc Jack McBride 
David Stewart 


Mr. William J. Lewis 
Director 

Ford Foundation ETV Project in Vermont 
Pomeroy Hall 
University of Vermont 
Burlington, Vermont 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

Returning from a trip abroad I found your letter together 
with a carbon of a reply from Dave Stewart. Mr. Stewart has 
covered the waterfront so well I feel there is not much % can 
add in response to your questions. All of your suggestions 
are excellent and I trust that you will follow through as you 
have indicated. I \ 

I feel very strongly that this is the critical time for 
this legislation. I doubt if there will ever be as good a 
chance again; and likelihood of success is, in large measure, 
going to depend upon whether there is early consideration by 
the Rules Committee of this legislation so that the House will\ 
have a chance to consider it. Unless he can get action ve 



early in the session, there is not much likelihood of obtaining 
any action on ETV during this Congress. 

I agree with Mr. Stewart f s estimation of the members oi 
the Rules Committee who are likely to be opposed or, at least, 
doubtful. X suspect not much can be done with Mr. Avery or 
Mr. Brown, but it doesn't hurt to try. 

Obviously, initial attention must be given to the Rules 
Committee, since action by this group is a prerequisite to 
any further action. However, there will not be time to make 
a proper contact with members of the House after the Rules 
Committee acts, so it is important to contact your Represent¬ 
atives now so that they can be alerted and, hopefully, in a 
receptive mood if and when the bill gets to the Bouse. 

We appreciate your suggestions and will be pleased to 
receive any other ideas which may occur to you for advancing 
this legislation. 


Sincerely yours, 


mm *i 


William G. Harley 



0appy y e a r 


INDUSTRY 

INFORMATION 



HEARINGS MAY CHANGE 
RADIO’S DIRECTION 

Attorney Kenneth A. Cox, when explaining the 
FCC Broadcast Bureau of which he is chief, be¬ 
gins by telling broadcasters that his aim is to dis¬ 
pel the image of a 
“cold-blooded agency 
bent on the destruction 
of the broadcaster.” 

Originally called to 
Washington as general 
counsel to the FCC 
when Newton Minow 
was appointed chair¬ 
man, Cox became head 
of the Broadcast Bureau in April 1961. 

In a recent talk to the Oregon Association of 
Broadcasters (a talk similar to those he gives to 
other states’ broadcasters), Cox said that the Com¬ 
mission has spent so much time on television that 
it may have lost some of its “expertese” on radio. 
Plans have now been made to conduct informal 
hearings on radio and there may be some changes 
in radio rules as a result. 

Some of the questions that will be asked in the 
hearings and that all broadcasters should be ask¬ 
ing themselves, as reported by the bureau chief, 
are: (Continued on Page 2) 



IN COMING ISSUES 

What does the U.S. State Department 
think about attacks made on it and its mem¬ 
bers—particularly those made on the air? 
One of our Washington, D.C., members, Si¬ 
mone Poulain, will answer. 

A new compaign against inflation, with 
emphasis on the broadcasters’ role, will be 
described in an article by Bruce Palmer, 
organizer and first president of the Council 
for Economic Growth and Security, Inc. 
Palmer was chairman last year of the politi¬ 
cal participation committee of the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce and once was named 
one of America’s Ten Outstanding Young 
Men. 


A SENATOR SPEAKS 

By the Honorable WARREN G. MAGNUSON 
United States Senator 

There is no subject closer to my heart than edu¬ 
cational television. For over 7 years I have intro¬ 
duced and urged the enactment of educational TV 
legislation. In the first session of the 87th Con¬ 
gress the Senate acted by passing my bill, S.205, 
by the overwhelming vote of 67 to 13 in essen¬ 
tially the same form as it was approved by the 
85th and 86th Congresses. Hearings have been 
held in the House, the bill has been reported and 
is presently pending before the House Rules Com¬ 
mittee. 

The outlook for congressional action and an 
ultimate program is much more optimistic than 
it has ever been before. This is due, of course, to 
the stamp of approval which has been placed on 
this program by President John F. Kennedy. 
Then, too, for the first 
time words of encour¬ 
agement were uttered 
by the Secretary of the 
Department of Health, 

Education and Welfare, 

Mr. Abraham Ribicoff. 

I am hopeful that all 
those interested in this 
subject will continue to 
communicate with the Congress urging the pas¬ 
sage of this legislation in the next session, so that 
the benefits of the legislation will become avail¬ 
able to all the people as soon as possible. 

_ (Continued on Page 3y 



HOW KNOWLEDGEABLE ARE YOU? 

We respectfully suggest that perusal of 
your AWRT Digest will help keep you in¬ 
formed about the industry. You don’t need 
to be red-faced when the “top brass” talks 
about what’s going on in Washington or 
elsewhere, so far as broadcasting goes. For 
instance, this issue will describe for you the 
FCC Bureau in the words of its own chief, 
Kenneth Cox. 










HEARINGS (Continued from Page 1) 

1. What do you consider your role as a radio 
station? 

2. What is the role of the network in radio? 

3. Is there room in radio for comedy, drama, 
discussion of public affairs? 

4. What sources of programing are available to 
radio stations? Are there both recorded and 
live sources? We need to know more about 
the sources. 

5. Is radio serving the local community? 

6. How does radio make its living? 

7. Are the Commission’s standards as to quali¬ 
fications realistic or should they be tight¬ 
ened up? 

8. Does a specialized radio station owe an obli¬ 
gation to offer more than entertainment? 
What about the old-time radio operator who 
is faced with competition from a newcomer 
who avoids expense and trouble (to reach a 
specialized audience), and thus gets the old 
timer in trouble rating-wise? Sometimes the 
newcomer cuts rates and accepts advertis¬ 
ing that the old timer wouldn’t accept, Cox 
said, and thus forces the old timer to do 
likewise. This is why the Commission needs 
to know the sources of radio revenue in vari¬ 
ous communities, he explained. 

“There are clear limits as to how far the Com¬ 
mission can go in investigating sources of reve¬ 
nue,” Cox reported, “but there is a growing con¬ 
cern over stations that are losing money.” 

Cox believes there will be changes in the inter¬ 
ruption rule. “In defining interruption,” he told 
the OAB, “we are inclined to shift to requiring 
you to report the total amount of time spent in 
commercials. The chances are very great that the 
present section asking for a great deal of detail 
on ‘interruption’ will be eliminated.” 

Cox believes there is a good chance he will be 
able to persuade the Commission to go into many 
of the above questions and problems on radio. 

On television the bureau chief has this to say: 
“The Commission would not like to see television 
duplicate the problems of AM radio to get expan¬ 
sion to too many stations. It has been easy and 
inexpensive to get into AM on credit and with a 
small staff. We do need more TV competition in 
some places but I’m afraid we might get program 
degradation if we had too many TV stations. It 
is therefore inherent that there would be limits if 
we went to UHF. For once a station is on the air, 
it is hard to get it off even though nothing in its 
program appeals to everyone.” 

Explaining the work of his own bureau, lawyer 
Cox pointed out that most broadcasters’ dealings 
are with the bureau. Applications for renewal, 
complaints about operations, many other matters 
go to the bureau. It has subdivisions such as the 


ONE OF OUR BOYS 

Robert D. Swezey, a board member of the 
AWRT Education Foundation, is the new direc¬ 
tor of the NAB Code Authority. 

Urbane, charming 
Bob Swezey, 54, was a 
pioneer broadcaster 
who joined NBC in 
1939. He was general 
counsel for the Blue 
Network when it split 
off from NBC in 1942. 
He helped write an 
earlier version of the 
radio code and the TV code. Further, he was 
chairman of the NAB committees which drafted 
the two codes, the radio code at Atlantic City in 
1947 and the TV code in Washington in 1952. 

Swezey has been away from broadcasting for a 
time, having served as a special assistant to Sec¬ 
retary of Labor James P. Mitchell during the last 
year of the Eisenhower administration. 

The code staff numbers seven with its members 
in Washington, D.C., New York City and Los 
Angeles. 

Swezey has said his primary attitude in the new 
position will be to try to make the code authority 
an affirmative structure — not just “against 
things.” 

His contract is for two years. He will report di¬ 
rectly to Governor Collins. He assumed the office 
October 15. 

One of Swezey’s early decisions was authoriza¬ 
tion for release of a letter to advertising agencies. 
Written by Stockton Helffrich, director of the 
New York code office, the letter asked advertis¬ 
ing agencies producing toy commercials to send 
along demonstration toys for the code to check 
against their copy. 

Economics Division with which financial state¬ 
ments are filed and published. It has a network 
subdivision to which broadcasters’ problems with 
the networks go—and so on. 

In a hearing it is the bureau that appears be¬ 
fore the examiner and before the Commission. 

Cox told the OAB that when the program form 
change was criticized by the industry, the bureau 
tried to work out the difficulties. “We did tests 
with the NAB and are now prepared to make 
substantial changes in the logging rules,” he said. 

One final point of advice for all broadcasters by 
Cox: “If substantial changes are made by you in 
the three-year period between renewals, you ought 
to tell the Commission and say why you made 
the changes. Keep yourselves in a current status 
with us,” he warned. 






Critiques by Audiences Urged 

Editor’s Note: Gilbert Seldes, author, critic 
teacher and broadcast commentator, is the author 
of the best seller, “The 
Public Arts.” Now, ex¬ 
clusively for the Infor¬ 
mation Digest, Mr. 

Seldes has brought us 
up to date on an idea 
he’s long cherished. 

Why don’t you 
broadcasters let your 
own communities, on your own air, tell what they 
think of you? Gilbert Seldes began asking that 
question of broadcasters some six years ago. He 
succeeded in persuading a few of them to do just 
that. 

Now the Dean of the Annenberg School of 
Communications at the University of Pennsylva¬ 
nia, Seldes still asks the question whenever he 
meets a broadcaster. 

Seldes believes that panels of local persons, 
telling honestly what they think of programing in 
their own areas, would benefit broadcasting and 
broadcasters. 

Recently we asked the Pennsylvania Dean 
what success his idea was having. The very next 
week he had lunch with Newton Minow who de¬ 
scribed correspondence with a station owner in 
Dallas, Texas. The owner wrote Minow that his 
station had aired a program devoted to the read¬ 
ing of critical letters from the public and to the 
station’s answers to them. “The significant fact,” 
Gilbert Seldes wrote, “was that the program was 
fiendishly popular and kept growing in ratings. 
It had a 23 one night in comparison with a 37 
for a top-ranking series.” 

Instead of a program devoted to the reading of 
letters from the public about a station’s program¬ 
ing, Seldes wants people on the air. “I think the 
program should be done before an audience and 
to get out of the rut, I suggest that one week it 
be lawyers, another pediatricians and another 
Iowans in Seattle, etc,” he says. “Ideally there 
should be time for questions.” 

Some broadcasters have fielded Seldes’ sugges¬ 
tion with this reply: “Why should we invite criti¬ 
cism when there’s so much of it going around 
anyhow?” 

To them he says that station WCAU tried his 
panel critique suggestion. On one program, after 
some conventional criticism, one panelist said, 
“You did have a good program on your air and 
you threw it off. Why was that?” 

The WCAU-TV moderator replied, “Took it 
off, did we?” Then he went into the history of 
the program—a one-shot which found some favor, 


was put on every other week and was indeed off 
for the summer—the time when the question was 
asked. “But,” says Seldes, “the moderator then 
told the panelist the program would be coming 
back every week in the fall.” 

“In one blow,” says Seldes, “two things had 
been accomplished. It became clear that a lot of 
criticism of TV was ill-informed and it also be¬ 
came clear that the station was alert to what the 
public wanted.” 

Here, however, is Seldes’ argument, unanswer¬ 
able, he calls it, for putting a panel of local TV 
critics on one’s own air. “In one way or another 
station owners will be subjected to public hear¬ 
ings when they apply for renewal of license. How 
splendid it will be for a station to say: ‘We have 
held public hearings once a week (or fortnight) 
ever since such and such a date. We have heard 
what the public wanted and we have discussed 
its wants. We have justified ourselves all along 
the line. Now bring on any critics you want. We’re 
bound to have the answers on our tapes.”—E.W.E. 

MAGNUSON (Continued from Page 1) 

I firmly believe that an educational television 
network, equal to and surpassing the commercial 
networks, will become a fact if this legislation is 
enacted. Then, with the startling and almost un¬ 
believable developments taking place in space 
communications, we will see in the very near fu¬ 
ture exchanges in program and ideas, not alone 
between the various schools and professional 
groups within the United States, but between 
the United States and such far-off countries as 
those in Asia, Europe and Africa. The potential 
is unlimited, but more important is the need for 
expanding this facility to meet the unprecedented 
need for the future, where we know that in 1970 
there will be more than 6,400,000 students en¬ 
rolled in our colleges and universities, as compared 
to the 3,800,000 students presently enrolled. It 
does not take a great deal of imagination to see 
the possibilties of educational television in the 
higher educational field. 

I could go on endlessly giving examples of the 
use, as well as the need, for expanding this me¬ 
dium in the educational field. 

I am pleasantly surprised at the attitude of the 
networks and commercial broadcasters to my bill. 
I hadn’t expected their opposition to it, but I had 
no idea they would so vigorously be for it. Acti£ 
ally it is the kind of competition they want and 
they envision a fourth network for education. 

Proof of the success of the education stations is 
this: when one gets started, it never does get 
taken off the air, with almost no exception. 

This article was written especially for The Di¬ 
gest by Senator Magnuson. The ideas are his. 



The Industry Information Digest is a 
service of 

American Women in Radio and Television 

75 East 55th St., New York City 
Editor, Elizabeth Wright Evans, Seattle 
Editorial Committee: Marianne Campbell, 
Gallipolis, Ohio; Doris B. Brown, North 
Wilkesboro, N. C.; Virginia F. Pate, Havre 
de Grace, Maryland; Jane Angel, Margaret 
Strickland Parks and Gertrude Broderick, 
Washington, D. C. 


NAB CONFERENCES 



By VIRGINIA F. PATE 

President and 

General Manager 
Chesapeake 

Broadcasting Co. 

(WASA AM-FM) 

The keynote of the 
NAB fall conferences 
has been in the descrip¬ 
tion of a series of serv¬ 
ices promised for the 
very near future in the 

fields of public relations, labor relations, vocation¬ 
al training, engineering, and management tech¬ 
nique. To call this proposed series of service 
“new” would be to give them a misnomer; in real¬ 
ity, they are an extension of services previously 
offered but with a new emphasis on practicality 
and a recognition of station services as a definite 
and continuing need. It is a down-to-earth drive 
to make a tangible product better by offering 
more attractive services to the radio and televi¬ 
sion members of NAB. 

First of all, in order to give coordination and 
continuity to this program, the Station Services 
Division was created by grouping certain service 
departments under one operating head. NAB has 
long been known for providing both valuable and 
individualized service on labor problems, wage 
hour matters, financial problems, traffic, editori¬ 
alizing, engineering matters, and the like. An in¬ 
tense effort is being made now in the collection 
and dissemination of useful information pertinent 
to all these subjects in order to bring them com¬ 
pletely up-to-date. More time is being devoted to 
the educational side of broadcasting with the 
preparation of booklets on “Careers in Radio” 
and “Careers in Television,” to be published by 
the end of the year. Already three Executive train¬ 
ing seminars have been held at Harvard Univer¬ 
sity for owners and managers. Plans to hold simi¬ 
lar seminars on various other aspects of station 
management are in the making. 


An announcers’ training manual is in prelimi¬ 
nary stages; this is one that will enable members 
of NAB to train good announcers to be better 
and also give announcers an opportunity to train 
themselves. The revised wage-hour guide has just 
gone to press. There are plans for a technicians’ 
training manual and still others as needs may in¬ 
dicate. Complete information, with pictures, on a 
revolutionary logging system pioneered at WMAL 
in Washington and now in use by some sixty sta¬ 
tions will soon be available. Its very adaptable 
use for the program, sales, and billing departments 
holds great promise for both time and economic 
savings to broadcasting stations. A survey of em¬ 
ployees made sometime ago will soon be in the 
hands of management. Twenty-three hundred 
completed questionnaires from managers on down 
provide a wealth of information on educational 
background, training, positions held, attitudes, 
likes and dislikes, etc. 

The Engineering Department of NAB is in the 
process of field testing operations in a number of 
selected television stations. At the conclusion of 
the tests, based on findings, the FCC will be re¬ 
quested to approve an amendment authorizing 
remote control of television transmitters. This 
would provide a considerable savings for 385 tele¬ 
vision stations which, at the present time, cannot 
have unattended operation. Manuals on automa¬ 
tion and stereophonic operation of FM stations, 
Conelrad alerting, and the latest techniques in 
the engineering field are contemplated. 

The Public Relations Department is engaged in 
a never-ending effort to persuade radio and tele¬ 
vision to do a better job of informing the people 
of the service rendered by broadcasting. NAB 
proposes to provide broadcasters with hard-hit¬ 
ting speeches to refute charges raised and spread 
by competitors in other media who capitalize on 
this industry’s occasional misfortunes. Such in¬ 
formation could also be employed for individual 
on-the-air editorials. Initial steps have been taken 
toward preparing a Public Relations Manual for 
Broadcasters, one that will enable stations to be¬ 
come more forceful influences in their communi¬ 
ties. Such a manual has never been published be¬ 
fore and may be two to three years in prepara¬ 
tion. There is a proposal to establish an annual 
public service clinic in Washington for 60 top 
staff members of national service and philanthro¬ 
pic groups which use radio and television to assist 
them. 

All of this adds up to practical and intelligent 
information that should promote maximum effi¬ 
ciency with cost-saving ideas and simplified busi¬ 
ness approaches to enable each station to occupy 
a strong and competitive position in its commu¬ 
nity—another example of NAB’s ready cognizance 
of broadcasting needs and constant vigilance to 
provide the services management wants.